Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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There also use to be a hotdog names "maple leaf franks".............

but not "maple leafS franks". Wow......from a restoration to hotdogs....how far have we fallen? LOL.

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but not "maple leafS franks". Wow......from a restoration to hotdogs....how far have we fallen? LOL.
At least we're only at hotdogs...not hotrods. ;)
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anyone looking?? for 1 of these, I have all the original to put it back, front end rear end all shocks and mounts steering

ect....http://www.ebay.com/itm/151241449143?forcerRptr=true&item=151241449143&viewitem=#ht_896wt_1200

Not to whine, but....this post is not really associated with this thread....although the "leafs' thing was steering it away.....sort of.

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Have the complete drive line, wheels, etc. to put it back stock.

hijack.gif

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A three hour drive to Columbia, Missouri<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate> to pickup my engine. Rebuilt and ready to go - after I wirebrush the surface rust and give it a coat of paint.

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I got lucky. Apparently, the motor had been rebuilt sometime recently before I bought the car in 1965 and Phil and I didn't drive it all that much afterwards.
Work done:
block cleaned and checked
Rebore
New pistons and rings
New bronze valve guides
new valve springs
new camshaft bearings
Crank polished
valve job (the car had hardened inserts installed at some time (maybe at the factory) and they were in great shape. Just needed the valves cleaned up and the seats ground
New timing chain
all new gaskets and seals
new thermostat

The oil pump, babbitt bearings (main and rod) were in excellent shape and didn't need to be replaced. The crank and camshaft were also in excellent shape.

I also had the flywheel resurfaced.

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I spent one of the most physically trying days of my life Wednesday taking the old tires off the rims. Forty-five years of sitting had bonded the rubber to the metal at the molecular level.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate> Breaking the bead was a new exercise in futility. After spending five hours getting the tires off two wheels and breaking the front bead on a third - the rear bead would not break even after I ran over it with my car! - I took the remaining tires to the shop less than a mile from my house and, with their machine, they had the tires off in ten minutes. Live and learn.

When I had the car, the three yellow wheels were on one side and the three black on the other. This matched the front upholstery, with vinyl on one door and the original cloth on the other. They will all be sandblasted and powdercoated the original yellow - or as close as I can get to it.

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I also have the springs back together and ready for clamp bolts and a last touch-up coat of paint.

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Now if it will just warm up enough so I can paint the engine!<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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What did the engine work cost and what would it have cost had it needed new bearings ect?

Nice to hear of a shop that appears to have treated you honestly, who did the work?

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If you don't mind me asking, who in Columbia, Mo did your machine work. I live just south of there. Sounds like we could be fairly close to each other. Maybe we should plan a get together sometime. Mark

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The work was done by Loop 70 Motor Parts in Columbia on -guess what - the 70 Loop. Ask for Elson, he's a good guy to work with. Every time I'm there the place is filled with car guys, talking old cars and hot rods. Three guys showed up while my wife and I were there this morning and they all helped Elson and I get the motor into my SUV. Boy did I need a pickup! Thanks guys, we couldn't have done it without you! I paid $1600 parts and labor. If the babbitt was bad we would have had to send the bronze-backed bearings out and the cost would have been in the $2500 range for the total rebuild. Elson kept me informed of the prices of the items he was buying. This is a one year engine - the head gasket, for instance, is only used in 1932 - so parts are more expensive than more common engines. The gasket set alone was $250! Parts for a 1935 Dodge engine would have cost half as much.

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I have been enjoying your story as you rebuild a nice car. It is good to see good writing and photographs.

About powder coating wheels. I had my 1930 DC wheels powder coated in the mid-'90s. It has been a disaster. They didn't cover well and I was impatient and ignorant enough to accept them. I touched them up with the appropriate spray cans. But that is only part of the problem.

Wire wheels always "work" or move around on the road. The result is that you will get brown coming around the spoke ends in the hub. Once rust gets under the coat, you can't see it and it just has a party. I have recently stripped two (paint stripper by hand and a light sand blast) and had them powder coated again, with a zinc undercoat this time. But the dumb #$$^%@#$%s didn't paint the rim inside the tire! Grrrr. Surface rust was extensive under the powder, especially on the outside of the rim under the tire. That may be partly due to me: I tried a little detergent and water one time when putting the tires on, and next time I took them off the water was still in there! Another hard-won lesson: do it dry!

So I suggest you think "belt and braces" and get something put on under the powder to catch any chips or movement wear.

I love wire wheels but they are better on other people's cars coz they are a PITA to keep clean. :rolleyes:

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I keep hearing good, then bad things about powder coating wire wheels. I asked about it on another thread and got a bunch of differing opinions. Anybody else have any horror stories? I think some problems are caused by poor prep and application.

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I keep hearing good, then bad things about powder coating wire wheels. I asked about it on another thread and got a bunch of differing opinions. Anybody else have any horror stories? I think some problems are caused by poor prep and application.

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I had a fairly crappy experience with the powder coated wire wheels on my '31 DH. The previous owner had powder coated the wheels. I kept on getting flat tires and could not for the life of me figure out why. No nails in the tires or anything that would puncture the tube. One day, while fixing another flat, I happened to remove the rubber band around the rim. THERE was the culprit!! When the previous owner of the car hung the wheels with a wire hanger (or whatever they use to hang the wheel from) to coat them, the coating bonded the wire hanger to the inside of the rim where the spokes came though. When the wire was removed, it left a very sharp, jagged edge of powder coating in that whole area. I had to remove each tire and rubber band and file those jagged edges down on each rim. Much better now. The main problem I have to cope with is rust seeping out around some of the spokes., but my car is an everyday driver (when roadworthy) and I drive it rain or shine. Water gets in and the spokes rub and you get rust dust. The powder coating on the areas of the wheels that don't touch the spokes is very durable.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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Tackled the steering arm today. Still snow on the ground, but it was in the forties and felt really pleasant with the sun out.

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The first job was to get rid of the massive accumulation of dried grease and dirt on the arm. A grinder and a wire brush took care of that in quick order. You can see how thick this stuff was...

Before:

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After:

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A shot showing the thickness of this gunk. Sticky, filthy and just all around unpleasant. More than a quarter of an inch. It probably kept rust from forming on the parts, so I'm kind of glad it was there for the forty odd years it sat in Phil's garage.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

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Once I had everything clean, I took a look at how the arm was put together. This may be old hat to a lot of you folks, but for those who have never dealt with this, here is how they come apart.

Once you take out the grease fitting, you'll find a plug that screws into the end of the arm. There was a ton of grease in there, but from the holes around the outside of the arm, I could tell some sort of pin was holding it in. I forgot to take a picture before I removed it. The slot in the plug actually lines up with the holes in the arm. There are multiple holes so you can adjust the tension in the arm.

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It turned out not to be a pin, but this little U-shaped device that spans the slot in the plug.

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It snapped out easily. What holds it in is the grease fitting. When you put the U-clip back in, you rotate it so it lies flat against the inside recess of the plug. When the grease fitting is screwed back in, it centers the clip and prevents it from popping out.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Now I had to figure out how to unscrew the plug. I don't have a screwdriver that big. Going through a pile of old tools my dad gave me, I discovered this (I think) tire iron. It fit perfectly and it and set set of vice grips made for the ideal tool.

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The plug came out very easily. All that lubrication had kept the threads clean and smooth.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

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With tension off the inner assembly, the pitman arm popped out and a pulled everything out of the arm housing. You have from right to left a spring plug, the spring, a cup, the pitman arm ball, another cup, the plug, the U-clip and the grease fitting. The pitman arm ball rides between the two cups and the spring absorbs bumps and shocks and allows the arm some movement.

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I was hoping the ball end of the pitman arm would be okay, but no such luck It was still fairly round, although not perfect...

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But the bigger problem was the deep slot cut into the arm below the ball end. This was caused by the edge of the opening in the arm rubbing against it.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

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More on that later.

The front of the arm was disassembled the same way.

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And the same problems surfaced with the ball stud that hooks up to the steering. Note the slot cut in the metal.

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The good news is that I ordered a rebuilding kit for the arm from Tom Hannaford at Then and Now Auto. All new parts - cups, springs, studs and plug . It's due to arrive in a day or so. I also ordered a new ball end for the Pitman arm. I'm not sure what I'm going to get. Tom says it's designed to be brazed on in place of the old ball. I'll post photos when it arrives. It seems to me that some sort of pinion or pin will be needed for extra support. I forgot to ask Tom if the new ball comes with a pin or extension. Since my wife and I are going to risk our lives on this repair, I want to make sure it's done right!

The other problem is the wear to the slot in the arm. As you can see from these shots, the slot and the circular opening in both ends of the arm have been badly worn. They should be symmetrical and the slot should be narrower.

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Tom says a machine shop can weld this up and grind the correct shape back in. Has anybody done this? It's way above my pay grade.

I got very lucky the other day. As you may remember, I huge slab of ice fell on Daphne when Phil owned her. One of the things that was badly broken was the trim piece in the center of the cowl. It is made of pot metal and didn't fare well against mother nature. I had always assumed I'd have to make one from scratch as they are no longer available from NAPA. :)

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I was browsing the site and noticed an ad from Hammer_31_Dodge with some 32 Dodge parts for sale. There it was! A cowl piece for 35 bucks. I couldn't believe it.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate> I contacted Shawn and we made the deal. It arrived in two days. Thanks Shawn!

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More on the steering arm when my rebuild kit arrives.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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I don't see it listed on their site, but Rare Parts in Stockton, California might have a new drag link for you. And if they don't their policy is to duplicate the original you send them and then add it to their catalog so others can buy it.

The drag link for my '33 Plymouth has ends very similar to yours but the body is different. It suffered from the same wear on the slots as yours. The new manufacture one from Rare Parts looks identical to the original but was made of a little thicker material. Seems to be holding up very well but it only has 10K or 20K miles on it while the original had about 100K.

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I have repaired quite a few of these by welding the slot in the arm as was mentioned to you by someone else, I have also welded the slots in the ball and then thrown the assy in a lathe to turn back down.

I would not in any way shape or form attempt to weld a new ball onto whatever shaft you have left after cutting the old ball off pinned or un-pinned but of course you can do what you want.

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Is the drag link supposed to have the bend in it and it also appears to me that the ends are not in line with the shaft. Could it be that this arm was bent at one point causing the excessive wear due to misalignment? Actually, to me the balls don't look that bad and even the ball on my "36 pitman arm is ground flat on the outer edge! The gouges could be welded and ground smooth and with new inner parts should work well. The slots in the ends should probably be brazed and reground for a better fit unless you could find better drag link. I'm not familiar with that year or the correct contour of the link.

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As far as I know that is the correct curve to the steering arm. There appears to be no damage or kinks to the arm. Without the bend, it wouldn't fit correctly between the pitman arm and the front steering post. I'm getting a new front ball with the rebuild kit, so that is not an issue. The pitman arm repair will be interesting once I see the replacement ball from Then and Now. I agree with Jason - the thought of welding a new ball to the existing shaft worries me.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Welding steering parts sounds like fun! The supplier should provide the proper type of welding method for the welder to follow. I would have a certified welder do the weld and get them to provide the paperwork to go with the work.

Steve

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I got my "Floating Power" motor mounts back for Now And Then Auto. They did a nice job. All parts had the old rubber taken off, the metal cleaned and painted and new rubber vulcanized to the metal in a mold that exactly duplicates the original. Take a look at the before and after pictures.

front motor mount

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The "steady rest" that supports the engine under the rear seal area. The redone part is the lower piece in the before pic.

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The transmission cradle. This had a chunk of the metal broken off. They cut and welded on a new piece for me.

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The spring damper. The small traverse spring that extends from the frame to the motor attaches to this.

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The spring bumpers

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I'm very happy with the results. Total for all the mounts was around $360. I don't know how else I could have fixed these parts. I did some 29 Plymouth spring bumpers years ago with urethane rubber and they came out okay, but I don't think I'd want to trust my limited skills to a motor mount. Now I can feel safe the engine won't fall out of the frame on some road trip!

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Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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AWESOME!

Hurry up and get Daphne put back together so I can take her for a spin and find out what Floating Power should REALLY feel like!

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I'm working on it, Phil, believe me! :)

I'm taking the front axle apart and have come to a screeching halt trying to remove the old kingpins. Which way does the tapered pin that holds the kingpin in go out? ? don't want to start banging on the axle, trying to drive it out the wrong way.
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Does it drive out from this side...

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Or from this side...

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Some help from the experts out there, please.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Last night I went over to the powdercoater's to film the process on my frame.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate> First Brandon washed the sandblasted frame with water and then sprayed it with a rust inhibiting solution.

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Then it was dried for half an hour in the oven at 400 degrees F.

Once dry, an electrode was attached to the metal frame supporting the car frame and the power "spraying" device was ready to go.

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The Lava Black powder was then applied as a heavy mist. It sticks to the metal thanks to the static charge provided by the electrode.

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Here you can see some of the powder already applied. When baked, it will harden to a semi-gloss black finish.

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Brandon spent a lot of time making sure the powder reached every nook and cranny.

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Then it was put into the oven to bake for an hour at 400 degrees F.

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It was late in the night by then and we put the timer on the oven and left for home. I'll have pics of the frame when it's delivered.<quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate><quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Getting back to the ball on the steering arm, some time ago I had one repaired for the DA. The engineering company made a hardened steel ball then turned down the arm so that the ball slid over the taper they had turned, then SILVER SOLDERED it onto the arm. Have not had the car on the road yet (can't rush these things!!!) so cannot vouch for reliability, but they had apparently done a lot that way. I believe they used silver solder so that it was not necessary to get the arm and particularly the hardened ball as hot as would be required for welding or brazing.

John

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