JFranklin

Does anybody have a time machine?

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 Why do people always leave the hood's and doors open in a junkyard?😡  Don't they know that car will be worth thousands in the future?

 OOops, I didn't notice the date of the pic.😳 Oh well...

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Collectors have usually focused on the roadsters,

convertibles, phaetons, and other models considered sporty.

Looking at today's car shows, you'd think that those models

were more common than they were.

 

This picture, though, gives a good glimpse back to 1941,

and we can see that almost all the cars visible are

2-door sedans and 4-door sedans.  Thanks for sharing

this window into history!

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Actually proportionately the photos is probably pretty accurate as there were alot  more sedans produced.  I see some open cars if you look close,  they just have the tops up.  Even back then the sportier cars were probably saved at a greater rate. 

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I came here from the future to invest in fresh water futures and his guy offered me such a good deal on my time machine I couldn't resist.

 

Now I'm stuck!

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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Great picture! I'm struck by the fact at there seems to be little body damage on any of the cars. Slower speeds, less traffic and fewer miles driven maybe led to less accidents? I guess contrived obsolescence did survive throughout the Depression.  I also notice that in addition to no open cars, there are no business coupes. I guess that could be expected since they were probably the lowest produced closed body style. Maybe saved for hot rods or for use as stock cars. 

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12 minutes ago, Buffalowed Bill said:

Great picture! I'm struck by the fact at there seems to be little body damage on any of the cars. Slower speeds, less traffic and fewer miles driven maybe led to less accidents? . 

 

Not much (if any) visible rust either.  When did we start salting the roadways during winter?

 

The photo was taken in 1941, and we went to war in December, 1941.  I wonder how many of the cars in this junkyard went to war, repurposed into bombs, guns, tanks etc.?  My guess would be: "Most of them".

 

Great photo, by the way!

 

Cheers,

Grog

Edited by capngrog
add some information (see edit history)
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I don't see the Vicky, but there are 2 Auburns. The obvious and a 34 sedan by  the tree .  2 roadsters in the middle and  upper left .  

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I would like that DeSoto Airflow just to the left of the PLYMOUTH sign, please. Or any of those 1931 and 1932 Chryslers.

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37 minutes ago, Curti said:

 I don't see the Vicky, but there are 2 Auburns. The obvious and a 34 sedan by  the tree .  2 roadsters in the middle and  upper left .  

Right on top of the GRAHAM sigh, note the open trunk that hinged on the bottom. If you look to the left of the Ford row I think there are two 1932 Victorias. Bob

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

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Forget the junkyard, go to town and buy a good car. This is when guys like A K Miller were buying Stutzes off the back row of used car lots and out of classified ads for $50 - $200.

 

Big expensive orphan cars like Stutz, Pierce Arrow, Marmon and Franklin were a drug on the market and could be bought for the same money as a good Model A.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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I'm curious about the big bus lying on its side in the foreground with the rear axle missing. I thought it might be a truck but look at the spare tire peeking out by the back bumper.

 

Front suspension is Dubonnet type as used on some GM cars in 1934 and for a short time thereafter. What is that V grille? Could it be a 34 Pontiac?

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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Lots of cars were repossessed during the Great Depression.  I am guessing the banks sold them off to the highest bidder, but nobody had any money.  It would explain why these mostly under 10 year old cars are in a parts yard.

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Cars had a short life back then, shorter than today. The cars in the junk yard look to be 5 - 10 years old and that would be typical. I have an old MoToR trade magazine from 1937. It has an article on how to sell ring and valve jobs which every car needs at 20,000 - 30,000 miles. There are also lots of ads for special piston rings for worn cylinders, and piston skirt expanders to reduce piston slap. In those days if a car made 100,000 miles it was a miracle.

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1 hour ago, Rusty_OToole said:

I'm curious about the big bus lying on its side in the foreground with the rear axle missing. I thought it might be a truck but look at the spare tire peeking out by the back bumper.

 

Front suspension is Dubonnet type as used on some GM cars in 1934 and for a short time thereafter. What is that V grille? Could it be a 34 Pontiac?

 I think 34 Pontiac is a very good guess !  But I don't see why you think it is a bus.  Looks to be a sedan to me.  

 

I would look at this pix all day long compared to the 70's to 90's car show pix.   

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I came up with atleast 10 coupes.  One looks to be 33 or 34 ford 5 window and a similar 33-34 Mopar.  Looks like a Buick Vicky maybe center toward the left .I only see 4 open cars and all seem to be 2 door roadsters or convertibles.  No tourings or convertible sedans. I didn't see any woodies either.  Looks like maybe a 33 or 34 Desoto coupe not far from the Chryselr Airflow.  

Leads one to wonder what they put in the barn?  

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