1937hd45

Model K Ford Question

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Maybe my eyes are going but every Model K Ford photo I look at has bent or mismatched front frame hornes.

 

Bob

 

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I've worked on a couple of these and have actually repaired one of those spring perches before.  The reason they look like that is an optical illusion when the photo is taken from a 3/4 view.  They curve out as much as they do down.  When you can see them dead-on from the front they are symmetrical.    

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Posted (edited)

Same car. 

 

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Edited by gossp
Fixing being a moron and calling two different cars the same car. (see edit history)

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Are you sure they're the same car?  The front fenders of the upper one appear to curve down in front; those of the lower car appear tp be straight.  The upper car has a varnished wooden dashboard; I don't see one on the lower car.

 

Gil Fitzhugh the Elder

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You are right!  I pulled the images based on location of display.  Essentially, when I found a pic looking at a K straight on I Googled the next image with the museum name added. I jumped too soon. 

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The car being pulled from the elevator is also a roadster rather than a touring.  It is one of the Porter Trust Collection cars when it was being moved into the Piquette Avenue Plant.

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1 hour ago, W_Higgins said:

I've worked on a couple of these and have actually repaired one of those spring perches before. The reason they look like that is an optical illusion when the photo is taken from a 3/4 view. They curve out as much as they do down. When you can see them dead-on from the front they are symmetrical.    

 

And here's photographic proof of this info. Two photos of the same Model K taken at the same time in the same location, one from the right side and one from the left.

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This was during the 2018 New London to New Brighton run BTW. At the time, I was told that there were five roadworthy Model Ks (with a couple under restoration) and four of them were on the tour!

This is the one that made me weak in the knees...

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This all started while looking at this photo of the Elmer Bemius Model K on the Anglo American tour in 1954. Figured that left front horn was bent after the run in with something. Also figured it was a way to ID the car today in the Fountainhead collection.

 

Bob 

 

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It took me some time to see it also, they curve out and down symmetrically.  Would love to own any brass car someday... 

 

We were out driving my 1928 Graham-Paige today wonderful car.

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1906 Ford Model K

Load Out In Oregon April 2018

 

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Drop Off In Iowa April 2018

 

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New London To New Brighton Finish Line 2018 

 

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Jim

 

 

 

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This is a 1920s photo of the only Ford K that was ever imported to NZ. The dumb iron issue doesn't appear here. The car was turned into this speedster circa the WW1 era and was supposed to compete in a race at Muriwai beach in 1921 or 1922 but broke its crank on the way. The engine survived into the 1960s when it was on display at a local Auto Parts store but seems to have disappeared.

 

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5 hours ago, gwells said:

This was during the 2018 New London to New Brighton run BTW. At the time, I was told that there were five roadworthy Model Ks (with a couple under restoration) and four of them were on the tour!

 

The fifth running and tourable model K is the 1906 serial number 2 which has been in Australia for quite a few years. The Australian K was the first one put onto regular veteran touring some years back. Then Timothy Kelly (RIP) restored his onto the antique automobile tours. Those two encouraged others and research has found the Model K was NOT the loser car historians labeled it in the '40s and '50s. There is hope that as many as six may be able to be at the OCF in another year or two.

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What a weird optical illusion!  Its because as the frame horns turn down they also turn outward, making the one nearest the view appear more bent than the other. 

 

Its the same visual anomaly seen on the 1958-1960 Lincolns:  The forward fender-line is dead straight, no gentle arch downward as is normal practice,  At the same time, it angles outward making the front fenders appear as if they're rising in height from the cowl forward. 

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3 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Its the same visual anomaly seen on the 1958-1960 Lincolns:  The forward fender-line is dead straight, no gentle arch downward as is normal practice,  At the same time, it angles outward making the front fenders appear as if they're rising in height from the cowl forward. 

 

A very astute observation!  Easiest illustrated on a '60 Premiere because of the side trim -- from the trim to the top of the fender line front-to-back is a consistent seven inches, but to accommodate the canted headlamps the front of the fender bulges out and the surface area of the sheet metal increases by 1/2" over that same distance.  

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Walter!  I discovered that drawing variations of the 1958-1960 Lincolns designs.  The gentle slope of the hood as it curves inward also re-enforces the visual anomaly of a rising fender-line.  Its just one of the styling features that makes these Lincolns so unique and unforgettable.

 

Sorry to divert from the original topic regarding Ford Model K, now back to the program in progress...

Edited by 58L-Y8
Sorry to divert topic momentarily (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

The fifth running and tourable model K is the 1906 serial number 2 which has been in Australia for quite a few years. The Australian K was the first one put onto regular veteran touring some years back. Then Timothy Kelly (RIP) restored his onto the antique automobile tours. Those two encouraged others and research has found the Model K was NOT the loser car historians labeled it in the '40s and '50s. There is hope that as many as six may be able to be at the OCF in another year or two.

 

Wayne, The Tim Kelly Model K was restored when it was part of the Bill Harrah collection, before that it was the Elmer Bemis K, (he had the Roadster & this Touring). It may have belonged to Henry Austin Clark at one time or on display in his collection. My 1912 T was the first car in the Bemis collection, and still has its 1950 restoration. I think it is special since it got his collection started, and was the very first old car I ever got a ride in. Bob 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

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2 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

...My 1912 T was the first car in the Bemis collection, and still has its 1950 restoration. I think it is special since it got his collection started, and was the very first old car I ever got a ride in. Bob 


Bob, I find really old restorations very charming — I have an early restoration that is 15 years older than the car was at the time. 
 

You’ve  mentioned that T a number of times, but I’ve never seen it — could you post a couple  photos?

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Bob (1937HD45), I wasn't sure of where Tm K had gotten his model K, but thought I had heard it went through Harrah's collection. That is why I made my comment a bit vague. I got to know Tim K a bit through the mtfca forum. I never had a chance to meet him in person, but on the forum he was always helpful and encouraging to others. He and Rob H have done a lot to correct the history of the model K and show that they are every bit as good a tour car as most cars of their era, and actually better than many of the others.

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Help out an old guy please. Where was the recent article about Model Ks that refuted the long-held view that they were not very good cars? Was it in the Antique Automobile or somewhere else?

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Posted (edited)

I believe that article was in the HCCA Gazette. I remember reading an article along those lines.

 

Not only do the horns appear to bend at different angles, they also appear to be of different construction. One appears to be a conventional frame horn while the other appears to be a casting. Very strange indeed.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)

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