Chris Bamford

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About Chris Bamford

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  • Location:
    Edmonton, AB Canada

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  1. I would grab some 3/14" or 1/4" flat stock and carefully lay out and drill/cut/file hexagonal holes to snugly fit the flats (once the pipe wrench damage was tidied up with a file). One hole at each end and maybe 18-24" long if you have space to swing it. A worthwhile embellishment (whether or not one makes a custom wrench), is to use the centre spark plug or priming cup hole to secure the wrench... fashion a heavy steel washer larger OD than the wrench OD and use something threaded into the centre hole to run it up tight against the wrench. That way you can carefully clobber the wrench with little danger of it flying off or damaging the flats.
  2. I believe that improved battery technology is the key to greater practicality and market acceptance. Mercedes has an innovative approach for one of their models:
  3. Thanks Jon. That was a very interesting read.
  4. Interesting post on the HCCA Forum from a fellow who installed a driveshaft disc brake on his 1910 Buick. Many photos included. https://hcca.org/BOARDS/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1095&sid=3e0918878629a141b5a775f6c1c2e57e
  5. Interesting photo, 8E45E... I think that may be my Orient Buckboard. Not that I mind, but I'm curious where you might have come across this pic? If it's my car I don't believe that's one of my photos.
  6. Better than I could have done without a roster, but... 1924 (front plate), 1953, 1928, 1956 yes, 1929 yes, 1951, 1951 yes, not sure, I dunno, 1976 1929 yes.
  7. Well, that wasn't too difficult on the first 11 oldies, although I was expecting to see a stab at the years as well as the brands. Mike, the way I count I see only 11 vintage cars — the Subaru was a modern that ended up in the cluster for a while. Car #12 at the end was out with our club for the first time and is not another Ford as Rusty postulated... one doesn't see many of these 1929 Pontiac sedans, particularly as nicely done as this example. Owner believes it is original wood in the body frame except for some repairs in the rear roof area. Despite this, the body is tight. I opened the drivers door wide and pulled up and down gently — zero slop in the hinges and you could sense the body moving slightly on the other side. Very impressive.
  8. Easter Paraders waiting on a stop light this afternoon during our local club's first driving event of the year. I'll entertain guesses on #11 but I reckon it's too far gone to identify. Edit: I discover when I click on the image it links to a higher-res version. That's could be common knowledge to regulars but it's news to me.
  9. Thanks Greg, that's very helpful. I probably picked this up at the Red Deer Swap Meet so it has Canadian origins to me. There's at least one 'teens McL-B owner near Edmonton. I'll check with him to see if there might be a specific need for the carrier within his circle — otherwise I'd be happy to have it go with your project. I probably paid about $75 for this one and that would be fine. It's pretty complete but there is a considerable twist in the LH cage about the 7:30 position.
  10. Is yours the ultra-rare three loop version like mine?
  11. This spare-tire saddle has a very distinctive mounting bracket that may allow positive ID. Thoughts?
  12. I acquired this treasure some 20+ years ago with the thought it could suit one of my cars, but the design tire diameter was too small. This carrier looks ample for 34" diameter and probably OK for 35". It would be great if it could be identified for vehicle make and approximate time frame — I can then try to get it to an appreciative new home. To me, the design is very distinctive (particularly with the long support arms and odd lower brackets on each side, maybe tie in with spring shackle bolts?) and I'm hopeful one of the many experts on-Board can shed some light on its origins...
  13. A bit about the man and his collection: https://www.drivingline.com/articles/the-incredible-car-collection-of-chick-fil-a-founder-truett-cathy/
  14. Welcome to the forum. IMO it's basically worthless unless as a parts car for a particular project. It also looks to be a very long ways from running. What is is your interest in this car, and what do you think you might do to/with it?