gwells

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Everything posted by gwells

  1. Mark, I'm seeing too many differences to be convinced. Rad emblem for one and the front of the fenders. Look at the bottom of the rad shell in both pics. The bumper on the OP's pic is also rather distinctive, although I admit it could an aftermarket item. Thumbs down from me on this ID.
  2. gwells

    Model A value

    LOL... Bob, that's a personal problem, I think. But you are right. A car located in Atlanta will have a different value than if it was located in, say, Nebraska.
  3. Another way to send a message is to hold your cursor (if you're not on a cellphone) over the member's name on the left side of his post. Click 'message' in the lower RH corner of the box that pops up.
  4. gwells

    Model A value

    Add me to the group that would suggest taking a very good set of pictures, describe the car as completely and honestly as you can, and list the car on eBay. As the old saying goes, it's worth exactly what someone will pay for it. Sellers not as steeped in the old car hobby, as many here are, often don't realize that small details have a significant impact on the value of a car like a Model A Ford to the knowledgeable buyer. Just a few Model A-specific examples: does the car have a set of working factory shocks in place? Do they have the correct shock links fitted, rather than later or replacement style? Are the fender beads all unbroken? Are the spoke wheels rust-pitted and if so, how badly? Is the radiator shell dent and crack-free? Does the motor have the correct-for-year carb or is it a Tillotson or similar? Has the car been converted to hydraulic brakes? Have the headlamps been converted to sealed beams? Because of a lack of this level of detail, it is often (IMO) not really possible for "what is my old car worth?" questions posted here to be answered with any degree of accuracy.
  5. As a lot of people here keep saying, there's really insufficient info for anyone to respond to this question, Jack. Is there some problem that prevents you or someone from taking more pictures to post in this thread so we can give you informed opinions as to the car's value?
  6. Jack, not really a rule but rather an unwritten convention on the 'net. It does make more sense to have all the responses in one place, don't you think?
  7. Jack51, You posted the same thing in three different forums here and, by long-standing internet convention, that's kinda frowned upon; it's called 'cross-posting.' I've merged all three threads together and have deleted the duplicate posts to clean up the merged thread, which is here in General Discussion. Just wanted to let you and everyone else know what happened.
  8. Jack51, I'm pretty sure most here are wanting to be helpful, but as many have indicated without a good deal more info, it's going to be really hard to anything other than a stab in the dark in terms of value.
  9. Keep in mind that the car may have been a few years old when the pic was taken. So I would hesitate to date the photo based only on the year of the car.
  10. gwells

    Early-mid '20s car ID needed

    Keiser, after looking around a bit more, I agree with you. 1917 seems to be the sweet spot. Although I haven't been able to search up a touring, the other body styles seem to have the correct cowl shape.
  11. gwells

    Early-mid '20s car ID needed

    I grabbed this one off Facebook, as it annoys me that I cannot tell what it is from the general shape of that radiator script. Not the world's best image, I know... Any ideas?
  12. gwells

    Early-mid '20s car ID needed

    After searching up some more images, I believe he is correct as well. 1920 Stearns-Knight L4 touring seems to be right. Thanks, gentlemen!
  13. gwells

    Early-mid '20s car ID needed

    No clue. The poster said it was the only photo he had of a deceased relative's car and it was a Michigan tag.
  14. gwells

    1920 open drive limo - or taxi cab?

    That step-up reveal is distinctive, but I sure can't find many pics of closed Marmons from this timeframe. The '17 Marmon differs in having a slightly-slanted back windshield and in the OP's pic it's not slanted. You have a picture, keiser?
  15. GregLaR, From my perspective, in the collector car market, like in virtually all collectible arenas, value arises almost exclusively from supply versus demand considerations. High demand combined with low supply results in high value. And conversely, low demand combined with high supply results in low value. The changing values of collector cars over the years come about because of changes in these two factors. For collector cars, it's the demand side that changes the most over time. The supply side is reasonably stable. Claiming a four-door sedan is less desirable is just another way of saying there is less demand for four-door sedans in the marketplace, with no other nuances implied.
  16. gwells

    Make of speedster?

    Allen, Because of the hood to cowl alignment difference between your image a couple of posts above, it can't be the same car shown in post 1. But I think we're getting pretty close here. Thanks for playing along...
  17. Because what I said was this: "It is a four-door sedan, probably the least desirable of all body styles available on this marque that year." And I feel that applies across the board, regardless of marque or year. If you disagree, please give examples where today's market values four-door sedans higher or equal to other body styles.
  18. I agree with what you say, but the physics is that car with a three or four-inch wide tire cannot stop as well as a car with a tire several times wider. This is a very personal opinion, in that I am probably going to sell my Model A simply because here in Atlanta other drivers will fill any decent gap in front of you and then slam on their brakes.
  19. That was a relative comparison. Do you claim that '36-38 Buick sedans are as desirable or more desirable than '36-38 Buick open cars?
  20. From my perspective, this 1925 Caddy sits at the nexus of a number of negative factors. A rather poor overall condition, with a lot of work to be required to restore it to decent and/or authentic condition. With the info we have, it is likely that a lot of hard-to-find parts are missing and the parts availability for this car is not good. From a performance standpoint, mid-'20s cars, even Cadillacs, will do well to cruise at 40 mph, maybe a little bit more but usually a bit less. And even with four-wheel brakes, the braking is extremely poor compared to vehicles just 10-15 years newer. These factors work against younger people desiring to own and operate such cars on modern roads in the traffic most of us have to deal with now. It is a four-door sedan, probably the least desirable of all body styles available on this marque that year. Also, closed cars are almost always a lot more expensive to upholster than open cars. Like it or not, the more common or less spectacular cars of the '20s have not been increasing in value in recent years; rather the opposite in real adjusted money. 'Tis a supply and demand situation: a lot more cars than the demand can take. And, as has been noted, the costs of restoring a car these days, even with a significant amount 'sweat equity' invested, is mind-blowing. The cost of taking a poor car to top condition is usually many times more than just buying that same car already in top condition. So many times, people not steeped in the collector car hobby equate rare and/or old with valuable and that's simply not the case, at least in my experience. De Soto, the negative vibes you might be feeling in this thread are coming from collectors who have 'been there and done that.' Please do not take that as insulting to you or the seller. Everyone here assumes you want honest and informed opinions, I hope. All that being said, I personally would view this as a parts car, not a candidate for restoration (based on the info available). And if someone offered $4,000 for the car, I absolutely would not let them get away. IMHO.
  21. gwells

    Make of speedster?

    Good eye. I admit that the width of the cowl in the OP's pic looks to be greater than the Knox Giantess images. The cowl width does seem very much like the image in Jeff's pic in his post above my last. It also seems that there's not enough room for that oil tank nor for a stack of four tires behind the fuel tank. But too many of the features seem very close if not exact. Perhaps the car was modified with a longer chassis?
  22. gwells

    Make of speedster?

    Bravo, Jeff. I think you've nailed it. Here's what I have found. "In 1911, the Knox factory built her a new Giant, which was christened the ‘Giantess’ in her honour. It was used in demonstrations and record runs, and was also raced by Lou Disbrow.” - http://speedqueens.blogspot.com/2014/05/joan-newton-cuneo.html I see that distinctively large steering wheel (to make for easier steering for her, one would assume), with the T-shaped spokes. Cowl and hood look right. The seat is directly atop the frame. Shifter, handbrake location looks right. Sidelamps, where present, seem to all be the same as in the OP's pic. None of the other photos show that aero oil tank but now the location makes sense because of the chain drive. And maybe that last initial on the side of the seat is actually a 'C.' Pretty clearly the same car. Again, same car. Note Knox on top of hood. Sidelights missing. But same cowl, same wheel. It's obvious from this series of photos that the Knox did undergo some modifications, but the basic form and equipment are there. Best pic I could find of Joan. Hard to be sure, but comparing the OP's pic, the eyebrows and nose look very similar. And in several of these pics, note that Cuneo was obviously very fond of big hats. I'm convinced. Anyone else?
  23. gwells

    Make of speedster?

    Thanks, Mark.
  24. gwells

    Make of speedster?

    Agree 100% with these.
  25. gwells

    Make of speedster?

    OP Mark, Is there any other info you can glean from where that photo was originally posted? Did the poster of the pic indicate where he or she acquired it? And you hinted that the image was not in NZ. Can you explain why you say so? Just scratching for some more clues...