1950panhead

Antique cars, this year and beyond, what will happen ?

Recommended Posts


Benefits of AACA Membership.

Posted (edited)
On 4/17/2020 at 11:36 AM, gossjh said:

I taught you to respect old cars, and you learned the joy of eating on a running board. I taught them that Grampa could be as much of a pushover as Gramma.


 

695B046E-73F3-48E6-8E67-E17D0E3F373F.jpeg

Edited by gossp (see edit history)
  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of those dishes belongs to the in between generation that is doing the finger pointing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only thing fer sure is that every year more cars will become antiques. (1990 in Florida now).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the immortal words of Homer Simpson "Crisitunity"

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why fuss over the money, someone else is going to get it in the end anyway. 

Less worrying and more driving. There's a lot more room on that car for bug splats so get rolling and have fun. 

 

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Fossil said:

Less worrying and more driving. There's a lot more room on that car for bug splats ...

Yeah, you got that right.

These are mostly from last couple of Sundays...

A7D9BC44-FBC6-4D9E-A990-D6DCB70277C0.jpeg

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every car is just a driver..........nothing special about any of them..........

222CDC6B-C4D2-416C-8E80-E274CDF769C6.jpeg

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really don’t understand expecting ordinary old cars to be an investment.  Supercars, collector cars, or rarities, I get it, but expecting anything else to leave you a handsome payout must be a generational thing, and one that probably died off a generation ago.

 

Aside from my unusual love of mass transit history, the reason I have a half-operable 30’ bus parked in my small yard is, I wanted to learn more technical skills.  I don’t need them for my job, and I’m really uninterested in learning on a modern car.  I think that is a great reason for a teenager or young adult to get a restoration project.  You can learn great life and career skills, whether it’s one Ford Model T or a collection of mainline railroad cars (yes, there are several young folks who fit that unusual description!).

 

When I found my modern daily driver totally unresponsive today, I didn’t worry for a moment.  I grabbed my tools from working on the bus, tools I wouldn’t own otherwise, and got to work diagnosing automotive electrical 101.  It was just a dome light that got bumped to “on” while unloading, but thanks to just 2 years of very off-and-on wrenching on a vehicle, this whole thing was no sweat.

 

So, this hobby can have a very useful future, and we can help achieve it by dropping the notion that our vehicles require the white glove treatment.  Show folks what they can learn, how it matters, and how much fun you have along the way.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
46 minutes ago, Brill_C-37M_Bus said:

have a half-operable 30’ bus parked in my small yard is, I wanted to learn more technical skills.  I don’t need them for my job, and I’m really uninterested in learning on a modern car.  I think that is a great reason for a teenager or young adult to get a restoration project.  You can learn great life and career skills, whether it’s one Ford Model T or a collection of mainline railroad cars.

 

Touche! Mind my French....That's a large part of where I am too. Loving the wrenching. Loving the rewards and satisfaction. My skills and understanding grow with every repair. Skills and confidence that do indeed transfer over to other things in my life. My old car has opened up tons of development opportunities for me...Still can't believe I rebuilt a manual 3 speed tranny. And it works!

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, keithb7 said:

 

Touche! Mind my French....That's a large part of where I am too. Loving the wrenching. Loving the rewards and satisfaction. My skills and understanding grow with every repair. Skills and confidence that do indeed transfer over to other things in my life. My old car has opened up tons of development opportunities for me...Still can't believe I rebuilt a manual 3 speed tranny. And it works!

Spinning wrenches and maintaining a vehicle is only half of it.

 

The other half is shaping metal, fitting, and welding.

 

Crig

 

IMG_3244.JPG

IMG_3246.JPG

IMG_3254.JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To steal a line from a friend..........

 

 

”Art is to hang on walls, cars are for roads!”

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love it. Keep up the good work😀

 

A7D9BC44-FBC6-4D9E-A990-D6DCB70277C0.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple years ago I went to a cars and coffee at a local guys garage. He was kind enough to to do it occasionally. He has a number of prewar  restored cars including a Cadillac, a Rolls, a Bentley, a Cord and A few more plus about a dozen other post war beauties. He saw me pull up in the 38 and came over and just went on about how great it must be to drive it as a daily driver. I asked him why he didn’t drive any of his except on and off a trailer. His response was they are valuable and he didn’t want that to change by road rash. I responded I’m in my 70’s as he is, my 38 is older than me and is most likely going to out last me. I can’t take it with me so I might as well get all the enjoyment and value out off it I can, you should think about doing the same. He passed about two months later and his kids sold all the cars and the garage. He never put 100 miles on all of the cars combined. Oh yeah he didn’t take them with him either. 
Have fun, drive the wheels off of all the cars you have. 
dave s 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/17/2020 at 10:27 AM, Buick35 said:

Padgett, We have a lot in common. I live in Florida(Brevard county),lived in the same house since 84,retired in 2016,have one cat on fancy feast although she's pretty old and probably won't be around much longer. However I do have two kids(grown and on their own) a wife and a dog. My son has the old car bug but my wife and daughter not so much.He has a 66 Mustang,a 69 Ghia and bought his wife a 63 bug.I have a 35 Buick and a 74 MGB. Just trying to keep them maintained.Wouldn't mind trading the MG for a different old car. As you know it gets too hot to drive it in the summer. Greg. Stay healthy and what old cars do you have?

Buick 35, you can't be too far away, and likewise, we have a lot in common.  I also live in Brevard Co (Cocoa Beach), in the same house since 1991, and retired in 2018.  I prefer birds to cats.  Kids all grown.  One (unmarried) son shares my interest in cars, but at 35 years old, is still in school.  He has two 97 TransAms, an incomplete 1925 T-bucket (which has been on my patio for 18 years), and my 2002 Eldorado.  He has expressed the desire to inherit most of my cars, at the expense of his 2 sisters who have no interest in them other than for an immediate sale.  All of my cars need work...notwithstanding the issues of having to deal with mega-rust 3 blocks from the ocean.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi George,My son who's married who turned 31 has a 69 Karmen Ghia that runs but needs mechanical work( has a back fire issue) and a nice 66 Mustang coupe that he'd like to trade for an old truck and bought his wife a 62 VW bug.His sister is 37 and engaged but I don't think she's into cars. As for me I have a 35 Buick and a 74 mgb. I hope we don't get any hurricanes this year and that things will get back to normal again, stay healthy.Greg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, there is a lot of opinions here on this subject. I don't think many if any of us on here obtained any of our cars, trucks, or whatever we are into thinking it was going to be our "golden ticket" in retirement. My  plan is to give my sons my cars whenever  they want them. Don't really care what the value is. I once heard a classic was only worth what someone was willing to pay for it and I for one believe it will always be that way. I do wish more people were into this hobby though. We have a local drive in restaurant that still holds weekly car shows. although, there aren't as many cars as used to be. Thanks for listening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Morgansdad said:

Wow, there is a lot of opinions here on this subject. I don't think many if any of us on here obtained any of our cars, trucks, or whatever we are into thinking it was going to be our "golden ticket" in retirement. My  plan is to give my sons my cars whenever  they want them. Don't really care what the value is. I once heard a classic was only worth what someone was willing to pay for it and I for one believe it will always be that way. I do wish more people were into this hobby though. We have a local drive in restaurant that still holds weekly car shows. although, there aren't as many cars as used to be. Thanks for listening.

 

I think most people come into this hobby for the right reasons--they love the cars. I don't believe anyone sincerely thinks it's a profit center when they buy an old car.


But many, many people end up there somehow after they've had the car for a while. They add up what they've spent to buy and maintain the car, or the extra work they've done to improve its condition and assume it's more valuable because of it. Then at sale time they start thinking about how much money went into that project and worry that it's just gone, poof! That's when they start thinking they should get their money back. And I think the next step in that thought process is, "Well, if I'm asking for all my repairs to be repaid, why not see if I can get a little extra? Let's see what the market will bear and maybe there's someone out there who will be dying to buy it." An inflated number starts to sound reasonable to them and if they dig deep enough, they'll find a few cars that are similar with big prices and figure maybe they're not out of line. It's very easy for people to talk themselves into an over-inflated sense of value in their car. It's natural--nobody wants to lose or admit they made a mistake, right? They don't think about the cost of the fun they had with the car, they just think of the expenses related to owning it.

 

Everyone here is susceptible to that kind of thinking and I bet many of you know how much you have "invested" in your cars (I tell my clients it is ALWAYS a mistake to add up the receipts or--God forbid--keep a spreadsheet). While you're enjoying them and embrace the idea that it's a hobby and not a profit center, and that the fun you're having has a cost. I bet you also know about how much your car is worth (or how much you think it's worth), and that it changes every time you see one bring big money somewhere or when you do something to upgrade the car. It isn't a different mindset, just an evolution of the mindset we all share. 

 

Totally normal, not a problem, and it's very common. It isn't a different group of "outsiders" in the hobby doing this, it's everyone.


Again, I'm not saying anyone is thinking, "I'm gonna get rich by selling my cars," but rather, "I'd like to get all my money back." Ultimately, it kind of ends up being the same thing in terms of unrealistic expectations.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. I just think of all as big toys that require responsibility in how they are used. My credo is not to spend more than have (IRS and Medicare make retirement planning "interesting".)

 

I do keep spreadsheets, mainly RPM vs MPH in gears vs tire size (for me 1900 rpm at 70 mph is the sweet spot) and length-width vs how to fit in stalls (need to rearrange a few things for himmicane season) but is part of the reason I live 80 miles from the coast.

 

Bet my cats would just love your birds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
25 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

I think most people come into this hobby for the right reasons--they love the cars. I don't believe anyone sincerely thinks it's a profit center when they buy an old car.


But many, many people end up there somehow after they've had the car for a while. They add up what they've spent to buy and maintain the car, or the extra work they've done to improve its condition and assume it's more valuable because of it. Then at sale time they start thinking about how much money went into that project and worry that it's just gone, poof! That's when they start thinking they should get their money back. And I think the next step in that thought process is, "Well, if I'm asking for all my repairs to be repaid, why not see if I can get a little extra? Let's see what the market will bear and maybe there's someone out there who will be dying to buy it." An inflated number starts to sound reasonable to them and if they dig deep enough, they'll find a few cars that are similar with big prices and figure maybe they're not out of line. It's very easy for people to talk themselves into an over-inflated sense of value in their car. It's natural--nobody wants to lose or admit they made a mistake, right? They don't think about the cost of the fun they had with the car, they just thing of the expenses related to owning it.

 

Everyone here is susceptible to that kind of thinking and I bet many of you know how much you have "invested" in your cars (I tell my clients it is ALWAYS a mistake to add up the receipts or--God forbid--keep a spreadsheet). While you're enjoying them and embrace the idea that it's a hobby and not a profit center, and that the fun you're having has a cost. I bet you also know about how much your car is worth (or how much you think it's worth), and that it changes every time you see one bring big money somewhere or when you do something to upgrade the car. It isn't a different mindset, just an evolution of the mindset we all share. 

 

Totally normal, not a problem, and it's very common. It isn't a different group of "outsiders" in the hobby doing this, it's everyone.


Again, I'm not saying anyone is thinking, "I'm gonna get rich by selling my cars," but rather, "I'd like to get all my money back." Ultimately, it kind of ends up being the same thing in terms of unrealistic expectations.

I would also add the heirs of someone's collection also fall into this trap. 

 

Either they totally reasurred their spouse and their kids before he passed that its 'an investment', or 'worth a fortune' to appease her constant complaining about it being a money pit while he restored it, or even though its still in pieces in the garage and in the house under restoration.  Unfortunately, the reality only sets in after he passes and she finds out what its REALLY worth on the market, especially an uncompleted project in many pieces.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point and why I try to keep mine is "go to LALA land tomorrow" condition. SLK230 still needs a fuel system flush &  fuel pump so a day or two but is not in the way but reast about a 1/2 hour away. Try to fire all and run to temp at least monthly. Park pointing exhaust at door.

 

Is sad when have to explain to a widow that their "nest egg" is a rusty parts car with a disassembled engine but when 1,000 miles away can't do much more. Also trying to explain to someone that a car with an inherited Texas title is worth $500 less in Florida (last time I tried, it took a year and a lawyer).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Again, I'm not saying anyone is thinking, "I'm gonna get rich by selling my cars," but rather, "I'd like to get all my money back." Ultimately, it kind of ends up being the same thing in terms of unrealistic expectations.

Matt don't get me wrong,  I respect what you have to say and it's well written.  I have been telling family members the same thing. "The car isn't worth what your all thinking it is"  It's just the irony of it coming from a guy who buys and sells cars hoping to make a profit.  🙂

Looking forward to your posts in the future. 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The reality is that some of us can afford an expensive hobby, that is the car expenses can be considered money just spent. And some of us need to recover at least part of what others will call  " spent money ". We are very interested in vintage gars but not nearly wealthy enough

to just write those expenses off as part of the cost of the hobby. 

It makes the need for adopting the right car from the outset crucial. Fall in love with and enjoy a car with long term demand, and therefore a reasonable chance of better than average cost recovery when it is time for it to leave your life. Not in most cases a profit, just a minimized loss.

Hard for a new guy entering the hobby unless he has grown up in a old car family, but something someone after the first decade of involvement or so should have a good idea about. As long as you are one of the people who can only marginally afford old cars.

 Nearly all my cars ; projects or runners, were rarish cars with a strong at least cult following. And what I would call " well bought ".  There are one or two { Ford's } that will be a loss situation, but the others should ; even in a down market , come close to a break even situation.

 The worst case situation is a person who has a somewhat run of the mill car worked on in a professional shop .Definitely " spent money "

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites



I think most people come into this hobby for the right reasons--they love the cars. I don't believe anyone sincerely thinks it's a profit center when they buy an old car.


But many, many people end up there somehow after they've had the car for a while. They add up what they've spent to buy and maintain the car, or the extra work they've done to improve its condition and assume it's more valuable because of it. Then at sale time they start thinking about how much money went into that project and worry that it's just gone, poof! That's when they start thinking they should get their money back. And I think the next step in that thought process is, "Well, if I'm asking for all my repairs to be repaid, why not see if I can get a little extra? Let's see what the market will bear and maybe there's someone out there who will be dying to buy it." An inflated number starts to sound reasonable to them and if they dig deep enough, they'll find a few cars that are similar with big prices and figure maybe they're not out of line. It's very easy for people to talk themselves into an over-inflated sense of value in their car. It's natural--nobody wants to lose or admit they made a mistake, right? They don't think about the cost of the fun they had with the car, they just think of the expenses related to owning it.

 

Everyone here is susceptible to that kind of thinking and I bet many of you know how much you have "invested" in your cars (I tell my clients it is ALWAYS a mistake to add up the receipts or--God forbid--keep a spreadsheet). While you're enjoying them and embrace the idea that it's a hobby and not a profit center, and that the fun you're having has a cost. I bet you also know about how much your car is worth (or how much you think it's worth), and that it changes every time you see one bring big money somewhere or when you do something to upgrade the car. It isn't a different mindset, just an evolution of the mindset we all share. 

 

Totally normal, not a problem, and it's very common. It isn't a different group of "outsiders" in the hobby doing this, it's everyone.


Again, I'm not saying anyone is thinking, "I'm gonna get rich by selling my cars," but rather, "I'd like to get all my money back." Ultimately, it kind of ends up being the same thing in terms of unrealistic expectations.

Matt,

Thanks for posting, I enjoy reading your posts.

Amazed at current prices of old cars and stock market, nothing wrong at all, pay no attention to 150k dead.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now