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The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL


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  • 3 weeks later...

I rolled out the nearly completed frame today.  First time she's been in the sunlight in a long time.  I've posted some shots taken August 24, 2013 to show the progress over the last two years.  A move to a new house and the construction of a new garage put quite a dent in the process.  I figure about six to seven months were lost, but things are back on track now and I hope to have the car assembled mid-summer of next year.  I found some appropriate rubber mat for the front floor and the running boards at Hershey.  The pattern is slightly larger than the original, but it looks just about the same.  Short of having some made, this is as close as I can get and the price was reasonable.  Polishing the new running board trim and putting the mat and the trim on my new;y made running boards will make for a nice winter project.

 

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Here is a shot of the mat I bought.  This is obviously a sample - I didn't want to unroll the whole thing until I'm ready to deal with it.  I bought it from restoration Specialties and Suppy, Inc. in Windbar PA.

 

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It's slightly larger in pattern than the original, seen here in my friend Phil's 32 DL. floor mat.  Same wide rib and tiny rib sections, but the mat I bought is about one hundred percent larger in scale overall.

 

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This shot of Phil's floor mat shows the actual size.  My wide ribs are about 1/4 inch rather than the correct 1/8 inch.

 

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This is the a shot of the material I bought used on a Chrysler I saw at the national meet in Springfield.

 

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Taylor.

Check this out. On Facebook.

 
 

This is a 1932 Dodge DK8 that was owned by my mother in the late 1950's and early 1960's. It was a powerful car with it's 8 cylinder engine. I've never seen another 1932 DK8 Dodge, but I suppose some still do exist. The picture was taken in the mid to late 1960's just before we sold the car. Should not have done that.
 

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Edited by countrytravler (see edit history)
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Taylor.

Check this out. On Facebook.

 
 

This is a 1932 Dodge DK8 that was owned by my mother in the late 1950's and early 1960's. It was a powerful car with it's 8 cylinder engine. I've never seen another 1932 DK8 Dodge, but I suppose some still do exist. The picture was taken in the mid to late 1960's just before we sold the car. Should not have done that.

 

 

Here is Bill's 1932 DK8 at the DB meet in Michigan....

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Here is a shot of the mat I bought.  This is obviously a sample - I didn't want to unroll the whole thing until I'm ready to deal with it.  I bought it from restoration Specialties and Suppy, Inc. in Windbar PA.

 

It's slightly larger in pattern than the original, seen here in my friend Phil's 32 DL. floor mat.  Same wide rib and tiny rib sections, but the mat I bought is about one hundred percent larger in scale overall.

 

This shot of Phil's floor mat shows the actual size.  My wide ribs are about 1/4 inch rather than the correct 1/8 inch.

 

This is the a shot of the material I bought used on a Chrysler I saw at the national meet in Springfield.

Thank you for the photos. It looks like a bit better match than the stuff I bought at http://www.rubbercal.com/industrial-rubber/heavy-duty-rubber/corrugated-composite-rib-rubber-runner-mats.html

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This is close to the pattern used in earlier years, e.g. 1930 DC on which the wide ribs are depressed. Unfortunately there are 6 fine ribs on my mat rather than 5.

 

What are the dimensions of the ribs on the rubbercal mats?

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Those don't look too bad, either. Do the wide ribs stick up or are they recessed?

 

 

I enlarged the image and it appears that the solid ribs are recessed

 

 

This is close to the pattern used in earlier years, e.g. 1930 DC on which the wide ribs are depressed. Unfortunately there are 6 fine ribs on my mat rather than 5.

 

What are the dimensions of the ribs on the rubbercal mats?

 

 

The wide rib is the same height as the fine ribs. Unfortunately I am about 900 miles from my car and won't be able to visit it for a few weeks so I can't answer you questions about the dimensions.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I'm going through a particularly difficult period in the restoration - nothing but frustration over the last few weeks.  It started out when I made inquires into having my manifold coated for protection.  The local (well, 50 miles from here) powder-coaters do this all the time and their work looks very good.  Just one problem - the manifold on my 32 is a two piece unit held together by four studs and bolts.  To sandblast and coat the manifold, I had to separate the two parts as the gasket in between would be destroyed by the heat of the process.  Simple - right?  I soon discovered this wasn't going to be simple at all.  I wire brushed the stud ends and bolts, then soaked the bolt heads for a week, applying solvent every few hours.  Then I applied heat to the bolts and tried to loosen them.  Every stud broke off - and broke with very little pressure.  Why am I not surprised?

 

Even though the bolts and the ends of the studs were off, the intake manifold was rusted solid to the studs.  No amount of soaking, heat and cursing would loosen it in any way, shape or form.  Finally, I was forced to drill the studs out - no easy job since they are two inches long and I had to go in straight so as not to damage the part.  Once most of the stud was gone, I could pry the two parts apart, and after eighty three years they were separated for the fist time.  All good except the bases of the studs were basically welded into the exhaust manifold.  No way was i going to get them out.  I was finally forced to take it to a machinist and he got two of them out and put two inserts into the other two holes (not Helicoils, but actual steel inserts.) as the threads were too far gone.   I found a new set of four studs of the correct length and now I'm taking the two manifold parts to the coaters Monday.

 

I have a couple of questions.  Does anyone have a source for the gasket the goes between the two manifold parts?  I bought some gasket material at NAPA that is designed for exhaust manifolds - a steel core with gasket material on both sides, designed for high heat.  It's hard to tell, but it looks a little thinner than what was in there originally.  This may just be my imagination, as there was nothing left of the original gasket once I got things apart.  I do know that the manifold to block gaskets are thicker and have a raised rib around the orifice to help prevent leaks.  I suspect the original gasket may have been formed like this, but I don't know for sure.  If anyone has a NOS gasket, let me know.  If it's not for sale, at least send me a photo so I can see what it looks like.  It's a simple square with four holes, one in each corner.

 

Second, I'm sure there is no gasket sealer or compound used on these exhaust gaskets, but if I'm wrong, let me know.

 

Third, do you recommend using brass nuts on the exhaust studs?  Any idea of the correct foot-pound settings?

 

Thanks for any help or advice anyone can offer.

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I believe that the gasket would have been constructed of copper /asbestos like the early head gaskets  If the two mating surface's are good I cant see using gasket cement is going to be beneficial There is enough "crush" in the gasket to counter any small imperfections  My 2249 Senior has brass  manifold nuts and I torqued them to 24 ft/lbs  Now that you have separated the 2 manifolds you will have to make sure that the mounting surface block side is nice and flat  when you reassemble the manifold  Hope I have been helpful Ron 

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I would use brass nuts.

I use them on manifolds all of the time. That way I know that I probably wont have to take it apart again.

As for torque you will have to use a good feel. Just buy a couple of extra nuts.

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Richard,

Went to the Motorclassica the other weekend and I had a good look at a 1932DL.

Thought you might be interested to see it and read what they had on the plaque next to it.

 

Cheers

Ian

Ian,

It appears to be a duplicate of my good friend Phil Kennedy's DL. (I bought my car back from Phil.)  Hard to tell from the photos, but I think it's painted Mercedes Drab, a rather unfortunate choice in Dodge Brothers color naming.  A very nice and original car.  Thanks for the photos.

RT

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this is the one i got

i know yours is reversed ehaust out back

but i think the way manifold go together is the same dimension

this one is made of gasket material

got it in kit from tom at early vintage dodge

jesse

Jesse,

Very close but no cigar.  Mine doesn't have the little extra square extension.  Mine is just a plain square with bolt holes 3-1/8" on center.  As you can see on yours, there are slight raised ridges on the surface around the inside opening that help seal the gasket.  I will be missing this if I make it out of a flat piece of gasket material.  I sure wish yours would work, and I appreciate the offer.  If you get a chance, could you measure the thickness?

Thanks,

Richard

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Richard, the black one is 5/64 and doesn't have ridge,

The copper one on eBay is 1/8 with a ridge,

I measured the one for 35 KC it is only 215/16 on center, and flat also,

I f I haven't got one, I would have no problem cutting one from gasket material, with no sealant, if surface is flat.

good luck

Jesse

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Why did they use the 12 volt system on the exports with ours being 6 volt in the U.S? Also why the smaller engines?

 

Ours are 6 V (New Zealand). I wonder if the 12 V systems went to UK; most of their cars were 12 V. Also, UK had a "Tax horsepower" based on the cylinder bore squared. This is what Wikipedia says about the British RAC horsepower:

"The so-called RAC horse-power formula was concocted in 1910 by the RAC at the invitation of the British government.[1] The British RAC horsepower rating was calculated from total piston surface area (i.e. "bore" only). To minimise tax ratings British designers developed engines of a given swept volume (capacity) with very long stroke and low piston surface area. Another effect was the multiplicity of models: Sevens, Eights, Nines, Tens, Elevens, Twelves, Fourteens, Sixteens etc. each to fit with a taxation class.[2] Larger more lightly stressed engines may have been equally economical to run yet, in less variety, produced much more economically."

 

There may have been other taxes or import duties based on engine size, hence a smaller engine was used for some countries. Other countries in Europe also had horsepower tax rules.

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I believe that Dodge went to 12 volt electrics in 1956 on there Australian models 

My parts book and the book on Export have 12 volt on the speck sheets. The book is from AU from the 20s to 38 Mopar. They also specked the 37-38 Dodge and Ply with OD.

Edited by countrytravler (see edit history)
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Well that is a new one on me  All CPDD products that I can remember as a lad all were 6 volt My uncles 3 of them were very faithful Chrysler buyers and they had Dodges Plymouths and De sotos and all were 6 volt My dad purchased a 1957 Plymouth ute and that was 12 volt

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Richard, the black one is 5/64 and doesn't have ridge,

The copper one on eBay is 1/8 with a ridge,

I measured the one for 35 KC it is only 215/16 on center, and flat also,

I f I haven't got one, I would have no problem cutting one from gasket material, with no sealant, if surface is flat.

good luck

Jesse

The stuff I bought at NAPA is thinner than that and that has me concerned.  If it's too thin there may be alignment problems with the intake portion of the manifold sitting too low.  There is no rush as it will take a week or two to get the manifolds coated, and that will give me time to hunt around for a gasket.  Thanks for the help.

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Richard I just had to go down to the work shop and check in the gasket set that I purchased from Tom and Cindy last year at the centennial meet Unfortuneatly the 2249 senior one measures 2 7/8"X 3 1/2" If it was the right size it would be on its way in the Sorry cobber I really wanted to help you 

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Okay, this is what happens when you get old.  I got to thinking about the manifold gasket I'm looking for and then it struck me - I bought a complete gasket set when I rebuilt the engine.  All the block to manifold gaskets are in there as I used them to determine patterns for masking the block when I painted it.  I go out in the garage and check my gasket set box.  Right there in front of me are two manifold gaskets of slightly different sizes, one of which fits my manifolds perfectly.  Another Duh! moment, but one with a pleasing result for a change.  An entire page in this thread on this and it's all for nothing.  Thanks for all the kind replies and I'm sorry to have wasted your time.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm working through some of the wood parts in the body.  Luckily, most of the important parts (the top bows and top structure) are in good shape and will need no replacement.  The floorboards are a different matter - they are plywood and all of them have delaminated over the years.  I will replace them with marine plywood.  One of the problems I've run into concerns the wood supports that fit under the edges of the floorboards and also surround the tool box in the floor.  These wood pieces are 1-15/16 of an inch tall so I've had to laminate several pieces of oak together and then plane the assembly down to the correct thickness.

 

This small piece by the tool box was in good shape once I sanded off all the gooey undercoating that had been sprayed all over the underside of the car.  I gave it a coat of sealer and then black paint as original and it looked brand new.

 

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These pieces are isolated from the frame and the floorboards by strips of black felt material tacked to the wood.  I happened to have a roll left over from my 48 Plymouth restoration that is an exact match to the original material.  Sometimes you get lucky.

 

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The longer piece was too far gone to save.  One end had split badly and I had to make a new piece.

 

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The replacement is made from oak, laminated and then planed down to the correct width and thickness.  The recesses (to clear frame supports) were routed out.

 

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Sealed, painted and ready for the felt and final installation.

 

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The slot these two pieces forms is for the battery cable to pass through the opening and then through the hole in the back of the tool box where it connects to the battery.  It's one long battery cable!

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