Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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Love the shock disassembly tutorial!

Makes me wish I'd not chickened out of doing mine and send them to a professional.

Thanks for sharing!

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Nice documentation of the disassembly, it will come in handy for anyone looking to attempt to tackle their own. Is there going to be a "Part II" for the assembly process showing the end result? BTW, you're doing a real nice job on the overall restoration. Scott...

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One small correction - on page two I state that "all four shocks are the same." This is not technically correct. All four shocks are the same internally, but there is a left and a right casting for the main body of the shock. They are not interchangeable from side to side. I've revised the page to indicate this.

And, yes, Scotts_DG8, there will be a part two soon.

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Nice job Mr Taylor- because of you, I'm going to attempt to do a set on a 55 Buick. Thanks for the detailed info. We use the same shaft repair kit on Semi rear axle seals. Works real good.

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A thoroughly enjoyable tutorial, Taylormade. This standard of presentation elevates the DB forum to a new level.

Thank you for posting it.

Ray.

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Excellent work and presentation. I too, used the Speedi-Seal shaft repair on the torque convertor hub shaft on the Dynaflow transmission off of my '56 Buick. The shocks on the rear of my '41 Buick are still original, and this gives me some courage to attempt to do them myself.

Thanks.

Keith

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Pictures like this keep me moving ahead on the restoration. Photos previous owner (and Dodge Brothers Club Magazine Editor) Phil Kennedy sent me awhile ago. This is how I remember her - minus the sealed beams and the missing sidemounted spare. :)

Daphne_zpsre5xun8q.jpg

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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This is how I remember her - minus the sealed beams... :)
I slapped in those sealed beams after getting stopped for having too dim headlights. Daphne needed to have her reflectors re-silvered. Me being still in school and my wife supporting us (on a $3800/year salary) who could afford that!? One did what they could back in the good old days (1968).

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I realized today that it was fifty years ago that I first bought Daphne. Now I'm more determined than ever to get her on the road this year as an anniversary present to myself. Here she is on the front lawn of the Delt House in 1965. For some reason I had temporarily taken the front bumper off - I have no recollection why.

front%20view_zpsqhkhifmv.jpg

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Ain't that just like a Delt to take the bumper off a car for no reason! Zeke (old KA)

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Wow, fancy graphics and pictures on an already excellent thread...this restoration process just keeps getting better!

No doubt. I'm speechless (which is rare for my loud mouth).....

Excellent thread and work Taylormade

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The sixties - I lost a lot of perfectly good brain cells during that decade!

I think I may have as well, don't remember.

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For some reason I had temporarily taken the front bumper off - I have no recollection why.

HAH! I, too, took her bumper off at one point. But I still retain the neural connections that remind me why.

It was November 1967 and I was getting hitched the next month so I stored her away for the winter in a friend's barn...that was just too short for her to fit in with her bumper on.

Look at the built-up crud underneath that protected all those parts for you!

post-61720-143142973488_thumb.jpg

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On another thread in this forum they are discussing a Dodge Brothers commercial currently running - the one with the two Dodge brothers quitting working for Ford and going out on their own to produce the Dodge Brothers automobile. This brought back memories of one of "the" stories in my family's history.

My great-grandfather, Charles Carolin, was a self-made man who came to Detroit from Windsor, Canada in the late nineteenth century. He became a prominent and very successful businessman in the then burgeoning Motor City, and owned one of the largest foundry and metal working plants in the city. He's the rather imposing gentleman in the center of this family portrait taken around 1908. That's my grandmother in the lower left, his favorite whom he always called Baby.

Scan_zpsg1kikyyj.jpg

Charles was a rich, stubborn, no nonsense guy. I'm sure he'd be an avid watcher of Bill O'Reilly if he was alive today. He was most upset when local ordinances forced him to give up his horses, and he absolutely refused to buy one of the newfangled automobiles, preferring to walk to work. One day a gentleman arrived at the foundry with a proposition: if my great-grandfather would mass produce certain parts for his new enterprise, he would offer Charles ten percent of his company. My great-grandfather viewed this offer with much skepticism - this skinny entrepreneur was making his third or forth try at starting a (gasp) automobile company; he had no money, thus the ten percent offer; his credit was not just bad - it was terrible, and it's said that Charles Carolin did not particularly care for the looks of this eager young man. Charles turned down the offer - cash only was the only way he would deal.

Thus the young man, whom I'm sure you've guessed by now was Henry Ford, eventually went to the Dodge Brothers for his parts and my great-grandfather gave up what would have been a massive family fortune. True story, but since the Dodge brothers designed many of Ford's parts and loaned him money to get things rolling, I doubt that any relationship between Charles and Henry would have been productive. In fact, I believe it would have led to another failure for Ford and much satisfaction for Charles Carolin.

Later, Charles - who was also a ardent pacifist - refused to manufacture munitions for the government during World War One. There went another couple of hundred-millions. It's the reason I'm trying to figure out how I'm going to afford the chrome plating on Daphne rather than bidding on a Duesenberg at the latest Scottsdale auction. Thanks Grandpa Carolin!

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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