Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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I started cleaning the motor today, getting ready for painting.  A few weeks ago I received my build sheet from Chrysler historical (lucky me, since I hear they are now not accepting requests until November) and it revealed a few interesting facts.  By the way, the charge for these early, prewar cars is only 25 bucks as they don't "translate" the information codes as they do on the later cars.

 

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I always knew my car was an early DL, but not this early!  The DL was introduced on January 1, 1932.  From July to The end of December the earlier DH models were officially sold as 1932 Dodge Brothers cars.  My car was built on December 18, 1931, thirteen days before the DL model was even officially announced.  The first DL carried a serial number of 3558101.  I'm not sure of the actual build sequence, but if you go by serial numbers alone, it appears that my car (3559282) was the 1181th built.

The car was delivered to Rockville, Maryland, and the gentleman I purchased the car from in 1965 was from Maryland.  The L.H. SEDAN WIRE103 is pretty obvious since I have a left hand drive four door sedan with wire wheels, but the 103 - I have no idea what that means.

The motor number matches the motor in the car - another very early number.  The body number is also correct.  Under WHEELS it lists 2 WELLS, which is correct as I have a dual sidemount setup.  The PAINT AND TRIM CODE lists 20004BFC.  No idea here.  I know my car was originally and still is black. The factory chalk marks inside the body verify this.  I wonder what the BFC means?  I believe my car came with yellow wheels, a light straw color, and perhaps it refers to that.

Under REMARKS it reads PLATE, and I can only surmise that refers to plate, rather than laminated, glass.  My car did not come with laminated glass.  If anyone knows more about some of these codes, let me know.

 

The motor is cleaning up rather easily since it was hot tanked during the rebuild.  Mostly surface rust that wire brushes off with little effort.  I'm going to give it a rigorous wire brushing, followed by a good scrubbing with Dawn dish washing soap, forced air dry,  and a good washing with wax and grease remover before I apply the epoxy primer.

 

This is about ten minutes work.

 

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The motor number is nice and clear.

 

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I also noticed these four stampings at the same height as the motor number along the block.  The are stamped, not cast.

 

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They read, from front to rear, P C C B (or maybe P, this stamp is a bit low).  No idea what they mean, but they must be there for a reason and appear to be factory stamped.

 

Finally, the casting marks.  I'm not sure if the 12-3 refers to the date of casting or if all blocks had that on them.

 

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Just some interesting information on the car.  It's really nice to know she's almost totally original.

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Came in from the garage and discovered a package containing my resleeved brake and master cylinders sitting on the front porch.  I had Hagen's do them and they look good. 

 

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I was trying to find some NOS replacements, but these things are really tough to find.  The front cylinders are an unusual 1-3/8 inch bore with closely spaced bolt holes.  No luck anywhere trying to find those.  The rears are the more common 1-1/4 inch bore, but almost everyone sells a stepped version of this cylinder.  I finally caved and had them resleeved in stainless.  Took a little over a week door to door and they look great.  65 bucks each including the rebuild kit.

 

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The master cylinder is still available, but I just had mine resleeved.  I don't know if the MC is original, but it's been on the car since at least 1965.  Hagen's put it together for me.  My brake shoes are in the mail, the brake lines are done, so the brakes should be finished this week.

 

 

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My guess is the BFC on your paint & trim might be for Bedford cord which was typically a slightly higher priced interior option than mohair in that era.

 

I think those other stamped letters on your block are inspection stamps giving some information about the original cylinder bore sizes/tolerances.

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My guess is the BFC on your paint & trim might be for Bedford cord which was typically a slightly higher priced interior option than mohair in that era.

 

I think those other stamped letters on your block are inspection stamps giving some information about the original cylinder bore sizes/tolerances.

 

Good catch.  My car does have a Bedford Cord interior.  That was also my guess on the stamped letters, but I'm surprised there are only four, not six.

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Good catch.  My car does have a Bedford Cord interior.  That was also my guess on the stamped letters, but I'm surprised there are only four, not six.

There are also stamped letters on little bosses on either side of the engine number, does that bring the total up to six?

Edited by ply33 (see edit history)

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I have found the information David Hochhalter sent me about the DC. At the engine number, a suffix A= 0.020" oversize cylinder; B=0.010" undersize crankshaft and connecting rod bearings. AB = both of the above. These should not be confused with the letter size of each cylinder bore stamped adjacent to the engine number and in line with.

 

So are you sure they are P and not B? The wee bosses are probably stamped with cylinder bore sizes.

 

The next question is obvious: what does each letter size denote? The info. from David H. was from a service bulletin.

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I have found the information David Hochhalter sent me about the DC. At the engine number, a suffix A= 0.020" oversize cylinder; B=0.010" undersize crankshaft and connecting rod bearings. AB = both of the above. These should not be confused with the letter size of each cylinder bore stamped adjacent to the engine number and in line with.

 

So are you sure they are P and not B? The wee bosses are probably stamped with cylinder bore sizes.

 

The next question is obvious: what does each letter size denote? The info. from David H. was from a service bulletin.

The engine group of the '28-'33 Plymouth master parts list has some information about the under/over size bearings/cylinders based on letters on those bosses. Might be the same as for Dodge as they used the same engineering and production teams. You might want to check the parts book for your car to see if they are described there.

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The engine group of the '28-'33 Plymouth master parts list has some information about the under/over size bearings/cylinders based on letters on those bosses. Might be the same as for Dodge as they used the same engineering and production teams. You might want to check the parts book for your car to see if they are described there.

I can't see them with a quick scan through the Dodge Brothers master parts list for all models up to 1934. What section are they in the Plymouth parts book?

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I can't see them with a quick scan through the Dodge Brothers master parts list for all models up to 1934. What section are they in the Plymouth parts book?

Beginning of Group 9 (Engine) after the pages of cut away pictures of various year engines, before the actual start of part number listing, on a page titled "Identification of Engine Numbers". It is basically there so you can figure out what replacement parts (standard/under/over size) you will need to order for your engine.

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So are you sure they are P and not B? The wee bosses are probably stamped with cylinder bore sizes.

 

 

Upon a closer look, I believe you are correct - they do appear to be the letter B.  The bottoms of both letters are faint, but you can see the beginning curve of the B.

 

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Your crown wheel is held on the carrier by the same system as the 1930 DC. Were all the lock tabs up and the bolts tight when you looked at them?

 

One of the bolts broke in my DC. Luckily the broken-off head fell down and was pushed through the back cover (hence the oil drained out) rather than going through the pinion gear. Every tab was in correct position and every bolt was loose, not even finger tight. No wonder one broke. The cover had been repaired after a previous similar failure, as had one of my spares. My thinking was it was a systemic failure so I used Unbrako bolts, drilled, torqued and then tied in pairs. Luckily it broke going over a speed hump at 5 mph in a car park.

 

I am enjoying your restoration, not least because the car and its systems are so similar to the DC.

 

Spinneyhill, I took a look at my crown wheel in preparation of buttoning up the rear axle.  I don't doubt your problems, but I'm darned if I can figure out what happened in your case.  I checked each bolt on my crown gear carefully.  None had broken or seemed the least bit loose and all the tabs were bent up tight against the bolts. 

 

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Were your tabs also bent up against the bolts after the breakage?  I don't see how any bolt could be loose if the tabs were up unless someone bent the tabs down, loosened the bolts and then bent the tabs back up.  I can certainly see how a bolt head might break off, but fail to see how any bolt could  loosen up.  Or did I misread your original comment?  That's been known the happen on my part quite often! :)

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No, you are completely right. I have thought about it a lot and cannot understand how it happened. The hard part to understand is that the cover damage indicates it has happened before. All of the lock tabs were hard up against their bolt head. My conclusion is that they are not torqued up enough and thermal changes many times have had an effect somehow.

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Yeah, I saw that. I don't think it is complete, which is probably why the bidding is so low. Can you tell what's missing?

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Yeah, I saw that. I don't think it is complete, which is probably why the bidding is so low. Can you tell what's missing?

Looks like it is missing the "extension pin" and "spacer", photo attached. I had to go look at mine to be sure as I don't need those two pieces to adjust the brakes on my Plymouth.

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Edited by ply33 (see edit history)

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I didn't need extension adapter on 30 DA, easy part to make on a lathe, with your talent!

If you decide to get the that AMMCO 1750 (the price seems reasonable at the moment) and you need either of those two pieces I could "mike" mine and send the dimensions. Like 30dodge35 writes, should be easy parts to make on a lathe.

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Well, I bit the bullet and bought the EBay item 30dodge35 kindly pointed out.  I ended up paying just north of $190, which is more than I wanted to pay, but seeing the ridiculous prices these things are bringing, I guess it was somewhat of a bargain.  Someone bid $189.00 with seconds to go, but I idiotically bid quite a bit higher than that with 2 minutes to go and he didn't go high enough.  For a while I thought it was mine at $137, which would have been a bargain.  Thanks for the generous offers of site members countrytravler and 30dodge35, who offered to loan me theirs.

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Well

You got a bargain at that price

I paid $300 for my set and it is worth that in the time and accurate adjustment of eccentrics on brakes I you see you need extension send a pm

And I will send the you can make one from it

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If you want your money back anytime soon, let me know. Zeke

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I'm unclear (from the 1750 instructions I found online) what the extension pin does.  It was mentioned above by several members that I probably don't need it, and I couldn't find it in the instructions.  From what I can see in the pictures of the unit I bought, I have the parts to measure the diameter of the drum and what I need to adjust the shoes.  Am I missing something - mentally and/or needed parts?

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