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The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL


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I am definitely not tired of your posts. I want to know details of everything you run across, good and bad. I will be a good guide for me when I get back on my original '31 coupe. I had better get on it....

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All your posts are super helpful to those like me just starting out on our restoration projects. I do know I appreciate all the information you are capturing here for my own 1932 Dodge DL coupe. So, I thank you for keeping up this topic. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

After taking the freewheeling unit off, carefully cleaning all gasket residue, making a new gasket, sealing everything with Permatex Aviation Gasket and reassembling - I still have a leak in the same spot.  I don't think it's coming from the shafts, but I have no choice - disassembly of the trans and seal the shafts.  It feels like I'm taking two steps back for every one forward, but I want to get it right.  This is becoming a major pain.

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19 hours ago, Taylormade said:

I sealed them with thread lock, but that was the area that seemed to be leaking.  I don't know what else to try to seal the threads.

 

That black tarry stuff, I think its called Indian Head.

Don't know about your application, but I do know on later engines bolts will go to oil and water passages.

I have built a few early Hemis in the not so distant past and I use the Indian Head on those bolts.

I would also seal the shafts ends with the same sealer or a Permatex sealer of some kind.

 

By the way, I enjoy watching your build.

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Very, very cool, Dick!

 

Looks like we have more than one car in common. Way back in high school I won a blue ribbon in the Scholastic Art Awards for a pen & ink drawing of a Miller racer!

 

You'll have to do one of these of Daphne after she's finished!

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I took off the freewheeling unit and discovered no oil had entered the unit.  I think this relates to the owners manual instructions to run the motor after refilling the transmission to get the oil into the freewheeling case.  This did make it easier to locate the leak, however.  I filled the trans with the freewheeling unit off.  Now the only leaks could be coming from the lower studs or the shafts.  After a day the leak was back.  I couldn't find any evidence of a leak around the studs, so the culprit must be the shaft or the screw hole that serves to locate and tighten the plate between the shafts.  I don't think (I hope) the leak is in the left (reverse gear) shaft as it is so tight in the hole I can't remove it without disassembling the transmission.  I suspect the right shaft, as it is loose enough to move back and forth with a bit of tapping.  You can access the other end from the front of the case, while the reverse gear shaft  end is buried inside the trans case.

 

IMG_7111.JPGIMG_7114.JPG

 

So, the plan is to put some shaft sealant on the right shaft, put it back into place, put some thread sealant on the bolt that holds the plate and also put some silicon sealant on the back of the plate.  Then a new gasket and Permatex aviation gasket sealant to button everything up.  Maybe I'll get lucky this time!

 

 

 

 

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That's the closest I could find, too, but I don't see "Quik Metal" anywhere on the package.  It looks  more like a filler rather than a shaft sealer - but I'm no expert as the past leaky month has illustrated.

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Loctite make a range of sealers, some with gap filling properties, which is probably what you need. The painful bit is that the parts being sealed must be clean, dry and oil etc. free for it to stick. I think they are usually cyanoacrylates now.

 

There is 290 "after lock thread locking compound", which is designed for post assembly application, e.g. for adjusting screws. It probably has strong surface tension to provide a "wicking" action into small spaces. Designed for threads, however.

 

There is 609 "shaft fit retaining compound", which fills gaps to 0.25 mm (0.008").

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Maybe it's no longer available but it was called Quick- metal and it was used for setting bearings and shafts that had a bit of free play. That other material may work but doesn't seem to be the same. A lot of products have been dropped over the years due to declining sales as automotive technology has changed a lot in the last 20-30 years.A good epoxy might help seal up the shafts also.

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I think Quick Metal is for filling holes before machining. You want a wicking sealer with minor gap filling. Presumably the shaft is in good condition with no nicks or marks, as is the housing. The hole is just a tad too big for the shaft.

 

Another wild thing you could do it put an O-ring on the shaft near the end. This will involve a trip to the machine shop, however. If you do this, keep a record of the size O-ring.

 

From this side of the fence, it looks like whatever you do, it will require the shaft to come out and the case and shaft to be degreased prior to installation with the sealer. Been there, I feel your pain!

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Got my distributor back from Jason at Advanced Electrical Rebuilders.  It's going to be a slight delay in starting the engine since I have the transmission out at the moment, but it's coming soon.

 

IMG_7119.JPGIMG_7120.JPG

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That shore is purty!

 

That bolt going through the distributor body carries the juice from the coil to the points. It's insulated where it goes through the body wall by a collar of some sort of non-conducting material...which deteriorates over time (what doesn't!) and can short out the circuit. That will stop you dead in your tracks, and it can be a head scratcher until the problem is realized. Just something to file away in your gray matter.

 

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1 hour ago, Phil 32DL6 said:

That shore is purty!

 

That bolt going through the distributor body carries the juice from the coil to the points. It's insulated where it goes through the body wall by a collar of some sort of non-conducting material...which deteriorates over time (what doesn't!) and can short out the circuit. That will stop you dead in your tracks, and it can be a head scratcher until the problem is realized. Just something to file away in your gray matter.

 

My old 1957 MGA roadster had that same feature and it took me FOREVER to figure out that it needed that fiber washer.

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What I did to make absolutely sure the bolt could never touch the distributor body as it passed through the hole was to strip off the plastic insulation from one of those crimp-on electrical spade connectors, cut the length down to the thickness of the distributor body wall, then slip that onto the bolt between the inside & outside washers.

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I talked to Jason about that problem.  He runs the rebuilt distributor on his machine to make sure everything is working properly.  It's a good tip if you have an old unit where the insulation may have worn out.

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  • 5 weeks later...

For those few wondering if I have given up on my restoration - fear not, I will be here to annoy you for many months to come.  A promised DIY bathroom renovation has taken up the last month of my free time.  Building the Pyramids was probably less labor intensive.  I just have to put up the glass shower door and I'm finished and hope to be back in the shop by the end of the week.  I'll be working on my leaking transmission and spark plug wiring, then I hope to start the motor for the first time.  My wife has been most patient about the time I spend out in the garage and I really owed her one concerning the bathroom.

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I know what its like to have other jobs that get in the way.

My daughter is turning 21 this year and she wants a 1920's theme.

Like a true Dodge owner I'm going as a gangster and I'm making myself a Tommy Gun !

If you want to follow me making it I'm going to start a thread under "Our Projects".

( my wife said i'll get arrested when I showed her my design ).

I'm still working on my car but only slowly at the moment ( end of financial year puts a stop to that )

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  • 3 weeks later...

Back to work on Daphne.  I hope my latest attempt to fix the leaking transmission proves to be successful.  It's very difficult to tell just where the leak is coming from as the oil follows the rules of gravity and flows from the top down.  The problem is, it gathers around the shafts and the actual leak is almost impossible to spot.  I suspected it was coming from the shaft on the right, but it could be coming from the joint between the transmission case and the freewheeling case and dripping down around the shaft.  I figured the only solution was to take everything apart and start over,

 

trans leak 1.jpg

 

I took the transmission out and removed the freewheeling unit from the back.  Then I extended the two shafts, cleaned everything up and used Loctite 660 to seal the shafts and put them back in.

 

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I cleaned up all the mating surfaces to make sure everything was smooth and spotless.

 

IMG_7163.jpg

 

Then I cut a new gasket, applied sealer and buttoned everything back up.  As a final measure, I applied a very thin coating of Permatex Ultra-Grey, their most oil resistant sealer, around the shafts.  I was hot and tired at this point and forgot to take shots of the finished product before I installed the Floating Power rubber mount, but you can kind of see the end result in this shot.  Not the neatest application, but the best I could do.

 

IMG_7167.jpg.

 

IMG_7171.jpg

 

I'm hoping the combination of the shaft sealer, new gasket and silicon will end the leaking problem.  I have to wait 24 hours before I can fill the transmission and get the good/bad news.  If it's still leaking at this point, I plan to buy a large metal pan to put under the car and just give ithe back of the transmission a good wipe before I drive it.

 

IMG_7164.JPG

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After taking the transmission out, I discovered my throwout bearing sounds a bit rough, so I'm searching for a new one.  There is a guy on EBay selling what are supposed to be the correct bearing, but I have reservations.  The bearing I have is a New Departure and the only number I can find on it is C.T.30  There is also the letter U stamped between New Departure and Made in the U.S.A.

 

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IMG_7176.jpg

 

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Does anyone know the correct factory number for this part for a 1932 Dodge Brothers DL?  Has anyone taken one of these apart off the mount and installed the new bearing?  I assume they are a press fit, but how hard are they to get off and how do you do it?

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Sure looks similar to mine.  The retainer seems to be the same, but the bearing configuration looks a bit different.  It probably doesn't make all that much difference if the inner and outer diameter are correct.

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Info for the DL (after engine no. DD-37886, without auto clutch) from the Master Parts List:

Clutch release bearing assembly: 314381

I don't find just the bearing listed, so that whole assembly probably includes much more than what you're looking for. But maybe it will help the search.

 

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