Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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No

It states in instruction after measuring drum

step 7

Remove the pin then set adjustment to half size install extension and spacer to take up space ion on axle between nut

But on the dodge you are able to get close to the shoes and it is not needed

I think with larger brakes with larger axle you would be further away from shoes and would need extension to reach and would not need spacer

It will be clearer to you once you get tools in your hand and on brakes

My drums were 60 oversize and I left adjustment as measured and installed drum with a little less clearance

Once you bleed system and depress brakes

Since you have slot then you can recheck for clearance

Edited by 30dodge35 (see edit history)

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For what it is worth, I originally attempted to set the shoes by dialing in the half and the clearance but was not happy with the result. I find it easier to set the radius of the drum on the tool and use a feeler gauge between the tool and the shoe to set the heal and toe clearances.

 

And you won't be successful, at least I wasn't, unless the shoe is arc'd to be pretty close to the same radius/diameter as the drum. Without a lot of fancy tooling, I found I could get that pretty close by getting a roll of sticky back sand paper at my local hardware store. I cut lengths to go inside the drums and then slid the shoes back and forth until the shoe facing was uniformly sanded. (I marked the facing with a magic marker first to be able to see where material was being removed.) That got my shoes to be the drum radius minus the thickness of the sand paper which for the paper I got was a little off what an official machine would have done but seems to be close enough. Each shoe is, of course, sanded to match the drum it will be installed in.

 

Never had a decent pedal until I arc'd the shoes to match. Now it is nice and high and I can lock the wheels if I need to.

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The sanding idea sounds interesting.  I assume you were able to keep the shoes flat enough against the drum to prevent a wedge shape to a cross-section of the lining.  I always seem to have a problem keeping the surface flat against the abrasive when sanding.  Do you remember what grit you used?

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I like the idea of sanding also

With the tool in place you can see the shoes are not perpendicular to the plate and axle

I would like to suggest before sanding

To bleed and activate pedal a couple of time

This will seat all mechanism in place

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I think I misunderstood ply33's post.  Are you sanding the shoes off the backing plate by sliding them back and forth inside the drum, or are you putting the paper on the drum and then putting the drum back over the installed shoes and rotating the drum?  I had assumed the former, but as readers of this thread probably know, I'm usually wrong. :)

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I had the drums off the car. For each drum I cut a length of sticky back sand paper and placed it inside the drum. Then I hand rubbed the shoes for that drum back and forth inside the drum until I had contact the whole length. It was not too hard to keep the shoe flat to the drum so that sanding was even across the face.

 

I guess you could do it by mounting the drum but you would definitely need to trim the sandpaper to the drum width (the paper I got was about 4 1/2" wide and my drums are quite a bit less. Also, you may have to be a bit more accurate in the length so that the paper is very close to the circumference of the drum. And you would end up with a lot of sanding dust inside the brakes that would need to be cleaned out. For the rear wheels it would be a real pain to install and uninstall the drums. And finally, getting the pressure between the shoe and the drum right to that the wheel isn't locked and isn't totally free so the drum can rotate and the paper can cut the shoe might be tricky.

 

I am attaching a photo of the box the sandpaper I used came in. It was scientifically selected (only sticky back roll of sandpaper in the local hardware store). Your local stores may have different choices. This paper is actually a little too thick. If you have choices, take along a micrometer or vernier caliper to check the paper thickness. This paper turned out to be 80 grit which was about right, it did not take long to cut the shoe facing to size and did not leave horrible scratches in the surface.

 

p.s. You may notice a shoe grinding machine in the background of the photo. I acquired that after I sanded my shoes and haven't used it yet. Price was too good to pass up and maybe I'll need new brake shoes fitted sometime in the future.

post-76060-0-46131500-1437840124_thumb.j

Edited by ply33 (see edit history)

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ply33, on another topic, I was reading your description of the repair on your rear brake hubs using a Speedi-Sleeve to repair the contact surface of the brake drum shaft the outer rear axle seal runs against.  It looks like your shaft is a smaller diameter than mine as the Speedi-Sleeve 99189 works on a shaft size of 1.887 to 1.893.  My shaft mikes out to 2.00 at the top and 2.05 at the bottom.  Was the shaft on your drum tapered like this?  It's the taper that has me worried.  I've used the sleeves before, but never on a tapered shaft.  I can find several Speedi-Sleeves that are close, but nothing with the range I need.  99204 seems the closest with a range of 2.040 to 2.047 - too loose on top, too tight on the bottom.  There is also 99199 with a range of 1.097 to 2.003 - just right at the top, way too tight at the bottom.  I can find no listings for a tapered Speedi-Sleeve so I guess I'll just have to take a chance and see what happens.

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I did not check for taper on my hub so I can't say if it varied. A taper of 0.050 over less than an inch sounds odd. Not enough to be anything like a Morse taper but too much to be manufacturing tolerances. Could it be an effect of wear over the years? By the way I am not clear on your "top" and "bottom".

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Here is the culprit, and the measurements I'm talking about.  The guy who turned my drums (a real old-timer) told me they were tapered so the seal would slip on more easily when the drum was pushed on.  The "top" is were the seal first slips on, the "bottom" where the shaft meets the drum.

 

IMG_6369_zpsnveldgt0.jpg

 

IMG_6368_zpsr3nnnoxi.jpg

 

IMG_6370_zpsd30sv6ls.jpg

 

IMG_6371_zpsod3lqlbf.jpg

 

The taper seems normal, not caused by wear and is about the same on both rear drums.

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Interesting about that taper. It could be that the machine shop that did it for me turned it before installing. Or it could be that the slight taper on your '32 Dodge is something they dropped '33 or simply did not do for the lower price range Plymouth.

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I noticed that same taper on my '32 DL when I had it apart last year. At the time I also had the impression that the taper helped slide the drum into the seal.

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Anyone have a source for the correct brake shoe return springs for my DL.  I ordered a set from Roberts and they are incorrect - the springs I received are apparently the correct parts number (T271), but , they are too short by almost an inch.  The diameter of the Roberts supplied spring is 7/16 of an inch, while my spring is 5/8".

My spring length - 6-5/8"

Roberts spring length - 5-1/2"

 

They tell me they don't have the correct springs and gave me a refund, but it would be nice to locate a supplier who can give me the correct stuff or not list it as correct in their catalog.  Anyone tell I'm having a lousy day?

Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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Hey there,

Are these the clips we were talking about for the brake and fuel lines ?

Cheers

Ian

Did you happen to have those or do you know a supplier that carries them?

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I just bought about 15 about 12 years ago and used about 5 of them. I bought them at a swap meet and I think the guy who sold them has retired now.

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Anyone have a source for the correct brake shoe return springs for my DL.  I ordered a set from Roberts and they are incorrect - the springs I received are apparently the correct parts number (T271), but , they are too short by almost an inch.  The diameter of the Roberts supplied spring is 7/16 of an inch, while my spring is 5/8".

My spring length - 6-5/8"

Roberts spring length - 5-1/2"

 

They tell me they don't have the correct springs and gave me a refund, but it would be nice to locate a supplier who can give me the correct stuff or not list it as correct in their catalog.  Anyone tell I'm having a lousy day?

Did you find some brake springs, yet? If not, I will look in my stash of parts for them for you.

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How many do you want ?

Ply33 was kind enough to send me some. I believe I have enough to finish my frame, but L'll let you know if I discover I need a few. Thanks for the offer.

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Did you find some brake springs, yet? If not, I will look in my stash of parts for them for you.

I found some from The Filling Station that are for early Chevrolets and are very close. They are the correct length, but the spring center is slightly longer and a bit smaller in circumference. I need to put my pull scale on them and see if they have the same tension as the originals. If you have any originals I would be interested.

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I checked the new brake return springs i bought from The Filling Station, a store that caters to the Chevrolet crowd.  They are the same length as the originals with a wire diameter slightly less.  The center spring is longer, but not as "fat" as the original.

 

I hung sixty pounds of weight on both springs.  They stretched about 3/4 of an inch to a length of to within less than a 1/16th of an inch of each other, the new springs being the longer stretch of the two.  Although the original springs probably received a bit of a built in stretch over the last eighty years, I think the new ones are close enough to use with no problems.

 

IMG_6444_zpsnfhx7pux.jpg

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Those are the later springs everyone is selling.  I think the ones I just got will probably work.  Thanks for looking.

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