Taylormade

The Ressurection of Daphne - a 1932 DL

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I installed my newly relined brake shoes and discovered, using my newly purchased Ammco 1750 tool, that they were not quite round when I spun the tool around the linings.  Using some advice I found on ply33's website, I trued the linings using the following method.

 

First I got a roll of 80 grit self-stick sandpaper at my local NAPA dealer.  Twenty yards for 19 bucks - enough to do forty cars or more.

 

I cut off a piece and stuck it inside the drum.  Then I marked the surface of the lining with a marker as a guide.

 

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I simply held the shoe flat against the paper and moved the shoe back and forth against the paper.

 

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After only a few swipes, about half the guide markings were sanded off.  Cover the bearings as even a light sanding produces lots of dust.

 

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Another 20 to 30 seconds of sanding had all the guide marks off, and when I installed the shoes, they were perfectly round according to the Ammco tool.

 

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Not exactly rocket science, but it worked great for this amateur restorer.

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I'm looking for a source of bumper bolts for my 32 Dodge Brothers DL sedan.  These are the long bolts at the end of the two piece bumper that holds the bumper pieces to the mounts. They are basically a carriage bolt without the square beneath the round head.  Many cars of the period have this type of construction so I assume someone out there sells them.   But, then, assuming anything in this hobby can be dangerous.  I guess I could grind down the square on a carriage bolt and clean up the markings on the head, but I'm curious to see if anyone sells them chromed or polished.

 

Thanks for any help.

 

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I think you may find the original bolts for these applications had rounded (bullnosed) edges on the top, ideal for chroming and giving a nice gleam, as opposed to carriage type bolts that have a sharp edge, a problem as chrome can be easily scratched or scuffed off, even just tightening them. For my '31 Chev, I purchased Stainless Steel carriage bolts and rounded and polished the edges as well as filing off the square shank, not chrome but look fine on a driver.

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I have my motor cleaned and ready for paint.  A backbreaking job, but it's finally done.  There are more cracks, crevasses and impossible corners in this engine block than I ever imagined.  One ten hour day to get it and the bellhousing clean.

 

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That's not rust on the back of the block, it's reflections from the brass spacers on the engine stand.

 

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Before I cleaned it off I took a shot of the factory paint run on the bellhousing.  Both the engine, bellhousing and transmission were painted at the same time at the factory.

 

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I really like the way the Dodge Brothers engineers designed the oil pan.  These external metal pieces guarantee that the edge of the oil pan stays flat.

 

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One quick question - I assume I must mask off the areas where the manifolds attach to the engine block.  I don't think a layer of paint would hold up between the block and the exhaust manifold.  I was going to put down the masking tape slightly oversize, then put on the gasket and trace around it.  Then I'll cut the tape with a sharp E-Xacto to final size.  Does this make sense?  I want to keep paint on the flat part around the manifolds.

 

Here is a shot of the gaskets in place.  I'll only mask the area they cover.

 

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Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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I would go about the painting around the manifold holes the same way that you have suggested. Have you checked with Jay Astheimer on the bumper bolts?

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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I really love this thread, glad to see things are coming along,your pics of your front fenders are really helpful. My '33 Chrysler CT front pass side

 

fender has a tear along the wheel well, and I have been scratching my head trying to figure out how about going about fixing it. Good Luck, Benny  

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Early in this thread there are many photos of my front fenders being repaired. Ed Thomas, my body guy did a fantastic job on my mangled fronts and rears. This was way beyond my pay scale. I've tried to do as much as possible myself, but some of this stuff is out of my skill set.

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General Motors installed both manifolds before engine assembly was painted. Paint on intake mani lasted a reasonably long time, but on exhaust mani it was likely off in first few hundred miles. Are we sure Chrysler/Dodge did not follow same practice? I cannot imagine them going through the "taping effort" proposed for thousands of blocks. Afterall, parts like valve train side covers and manifolds would not likely never be off car in first several thousand miles.

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DC8Dave told me the 1930 DC engine was painted as one unit, including head, block, valve covers, water pump, thermostat housing, oil pan, bell housing and transmission. I suspect you are right about the manifolds too. All the nuts, bolts and screws were silver cadmium plated. So the nuts and bolts holding all these parts on would be painted over the plating.

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I have a old manifold , I just temp bolt with a couple bolts and paint,

My good one to install , I have painted with high temp stainless steel , or the power coaster did exhaust with a very high temp paint inside and out on my other truck and it still holding up,

Jesse

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I agree that the manifolds were painted with the engine and other assorted parts. Not original, but I'd like to keep my manifolds looking good - so they will be coated.

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A perfect day for painting today, seventy-three degrees and low humidity.  I cleaned the block with wax and grease remover, then washed it with hot soapy water.  Blew everything dry with my air hose and primed the motor this morning.  No wind and no bugs! 

 

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About an hour later I shot the gray final coats.  Came out to a very close match to what I found on the lower bellhousing cover.  It looks a bit shinier than in the photos, with a slightly more greenish tint, but still looks like an originally painted engine and not a glazed donut.  This is as close as I can get to what came out of the factory.  Can't wait to drop it into the frame.

 

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Edited by Taylormade (see edit history)

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The other side, now baking in the sun.  I'm really glad to have this done, as the frame is now virtually complete.  Another month and I should be able to start her up and take a test drive around the block - sitting on an apple crate, of course.

 

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Got everything painted today except the transmission.  I still have to do a few minor repairs before I paint it.  I hooked it up to the bellhousing so it would mask the areas where I didn't want paint.

 

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The front motor mount cradle and the valve covers.

 

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The lower bellhousing cover.

 

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And the transmission mount.

 

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A long day, but for a change I feel like I've managed to accomplish something

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You have definitely accomplished something! That stuff is looking really good.

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Thanks, keiser31, I think the cooler weather got my heart started. It's been so hot here in Central Illinois that I was only good for a few hours in the garage before things ceased being fun. I've managed about ten hours a day since Friday and this week's forecast looks great.

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It's been really smokey from all of the forest fires here. Same thing. Can't do much outside that way.

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Looks superb......unfortunately, the guy who did my engine painted it. Never mind.

Keep the pics coming, really enjoying your thread.

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Help!

 

Well, just as things seemed to be going swimmingly, disaster has reared its ugly head.  I thought I'd checked out my transmission and everything was just fine, then I took a closer look - my main shaft gear has a big old chip out of it.  How I missed this before now totally escapes me, but I went back and looked at some old pics when I took the top cover off and it shows up in those, too.  Mother of Mercy, is this the end of Rico?

 

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So, looks like I need a new mainshaft.  Funny, they didn't have one down at the local NAPA.  Go figure!

 

I figured since I have to take out the mainshaft, I might as well check out the rest of the tranny and see if any other problems are lurking below the surface.  After pulling the freewheeling unit off the back I tried to preserve the ultra thin gasket that the instruction books says is absolutely vital and must be the correct thickness or I may "experience problems negotiating hills when the free wheeling unit is locked out."  Naturally, it disintegrated, so that's another problem to deal with down the line.

 

Then, to get the main shaft off I did the following (this may be old hat to most of you guys, but this a a first time deal for me and maybe someone out there can benefit from my woes.)

 

There are two main shafts running the length of the transmission.  The mainshaft up front, and the transmission shaft at the rear, the front of which fits into a bushing at the rear of the mainshaft.  Both are supported by roller bearings held from going into the case by an outer snap ring and to the shaft by an inner snap ring.  I removed the inner ring from the rear transmission shaft so it could slide inside the bearing.  Then I tapped the rear of the shaft with a rubber mallet and after a few blows it moved toward the front and drove the mainshaft and its bearing forward and out of the housing.  It came out pretty easily.

 

Now the mainshaft was free.  This is what I need, minus the bearing which is still attached by the inner snap ring.  You can also see the outer snap ring on the outer diameter of the bearing.   I don't have a Master Parts Book, so if anyone could tell me what other years will fit it would be most helpful.

 

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My next problem was getting the transmission shaft out of the casing.  I put the snap ring back on and drove it out the back of the case, removed the snap ring and slid the bearing off the shaft.  Again, the bearing came out of the case fairly easy and also slid off the shaft easily once the ring was off.

 

Now I encountered my next, still unsolved problem.  The mainshaft was still in the case with all its gears in place and there was no way to get it out of the darn thing.  I slid off the transmission shaft pilot bearing and the gearshift fork and they fit through the bearing hole in the front.  This left me with what you see below.

 

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I assume I must remove the front gear that is attached to the shaft.  I moves slightly, so I know its not cast in place.  I think once I figure out how to get this off, I can slide off the next gear, which rotates on the shaft and move the shaft forward enough to slide the large gear at the rear off and then remove the shaft.  Does anyone know how this front gear comes off - if it indeed does?

 

I'm thinking the the slotted thingy in this shot probably unscrews, but I don't want to force anything.  I assume there is some sort of a tool to get this off and I assume they are impossible to find.  Of course, I may be totally wrong about the whole thing.

 

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So, I need technical advice and a mainshaft.  Any help will be greatly appreciated!

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What is the part number for the main cluster gear you need? I know that on the Plymouth side there was a huge redesign between '32 and '33 but your '32 Dodge transmission looks remarkably similar to my '33 Plymouth so there is a slight chance the part numbers match up. And if so, there is a chance there is a used one in my spare transmission parts stash.

 

Unfortunately my '33 Plymouth parts book is packed away, so I'd also need someone to look up the equivalent number on the Plymouth side.

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