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Talk about Price!!!


plymouthcranbrook
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I'm a Chevrolet fanatic, Too. I bought it for the wife to drive. It is the only car I have with an automatic transmission... This is my next project. It need some transmission work.. Now that the Darrin is done.. My son wants it on the road again..

I am not sure if the 395hp. is a good idea to let a 15 year old drive..

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)
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I'm a Chevrolet fanatic, Too. I bought it for the wife to drive. It is the only car I have with an automatic transmission... This is my next project. It need some transmission work.. Now that the Darrin is done.. My son wants it one the road again..

I am not sure if the 395hp. is a good idea to let a 15 year old drive..

Isn't that the 350hp model 300? That is what my book says.

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Is that the 383 or the 440?? It is still a lot hp for my son to drive.. The darrin has 95 hp. He will not drive it.. But it is his car....

This car has the 440...

We all know the 440 big-block is the largest displacement V-8 engine built by Chrysler, and when it comes to a combination of torque, power, and drivability, the 440 ranks as one of the best engines ever built. Instead of utilizing a high compression ratio or aggressive cam grind for its muscle, the 440 relies on sheer size, making great power from an idle with enough torque to get even the heaviest Mopar C-Body moving quickly. And while the Mopar 440 does several things very well, we've always felt that with a few tweaks the engine was capable of well over the 375 horsepower rating it got from the factory.

http://www.moparmusclemagazine.com/techarticles/engine/mopp_1304_440_mopar_engine_back_to_basics/

350 hp or 395 hp still a lot..

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)
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Other than the color that car is identical to the hemi my friend Dave Horne bought from the Port Hope Plymouth dealer. He got it wholesale but had to let the dealer display it in the showroom for a week.

He beat the car to death drag racing and street racing, last time I saw it, was in a junk yard when it was about 8 years old. I almost bought it but shook my head and came to my senses. What would I do with a worn out Plymouth with no motor? Oh well.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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Are those prices really so crazy? We can all remember various cars that were cheap beaters back in the day that are worth a fortune now. I seem to recall hearing about how early AACA members would buy Full Classics not as show cars, but as tow vehicles for their brass cars. I know of at least one Duesenberg J that was being used as a tow truck until the 1980s. Heck, my father bought a 1967 Camaro SS396 convertible with an L78 engine brand new, and promptly drove it into Lake Erie when he went to check on his boat during a storm and the road washed out. They hauled it out, dried it out, and he drove it for another six years, at which point it was so clapped out that I called it "The Clunker." That car probably got a full restoration at some point and could be worth $90,000 today.

HEMI fever has definitely cooled a bit, but they're still at the very top of the muscle car food chain. I think a big part of that is that Chryslers are far better documented than Fords and Chevys and as a result, it's much easier to separate the "investment grade" cars from the garden-variety and clones. Hemis were insanely expensive when they were new, so they were always limited production, again, making them scarce. Is it crazy for someone to pay a quarter-million dollars for a V16 Cadillac sedan when a V8 sedan is worth $40,000?

Don't get me wrong, I'm not particularly enamored with these cars (although I'll admit to having a 1-of-2 1967 Coronet R/T Hemi convertible in my inventory), but I can understand the appreciation for such a car. Documentation, scarcity, performance, and to many, attractive good looks, well, that's what makes a car valuable, no? They're not my thing, but I can certainly understand why they are other people's thing.

Remember when everyone lost their collective minds when Tom Monaghan bought a Bugatti Royale for $1 million back in the early '80s? Not that a Mopar can compete with a Royale, but what I'm saying is that prices are always moving, there are always top-flight cars that deserve a premium price, and there will always be folks who don't understand what other folks see in certain cars or why they'd pay so much. There will always be someone willing to pay a lot of money for a car he loves. I don't particularly like Model Ts, but I don't begrudge other guys for loving them. It's why we're not all driving identical cars!

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One thing about it. ANY old collector item truly is worth EXACTLY what someone will pay for it, at any given moment. It will not bring another dime more.

I've been in the car hobby a LONG time...still have dash plaques from events I attended in the 1950's, as a little boy in the back seat of my parents' Hupmobile. And I clearly recall the sensation, amazement, and exasperation among the adults in our AACA chapter when one of our members was able to sell his restored 1931 Chrysler rumble-seat convertible for 5 grand. (Could you IMAGINE?!?.... That was half the cost of my parents' house!) There were even some angry folks complaining that "rich people" were going to ruin the hobby for the average guy.

Times change. Change is always unexpected, uncomfortable, and difficult to accept. But ANY collectible is worth exactly whatever someone will pay for it. And at auctions, the only way a price can get very high is if at least TWO people think it is worth it. Sometimes they are wrong and overpay, sometimes they are right and re-sell later for profit. And sometimes the market changes completely, making winners and losers (financially speaking) out people by pure luck. (Remember when 55-57 Chevy convertibles were "gold," but 1958-59 Chevy's were undesirable? And how about those "worthless" big finned Mopar convertibles of the late 1950's?) Times do change. 'Twas ever thus!

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The price of a base Plymouth Belvedere 2 door sedan was about $2200 or $2500 in 1966. The Hemi option cost just under one thousand dollars, $995 or something like that. So yes, it was an insanely expensive option but that didn't just get the engine but reinforced body, heavy duty suspension, rear axle, brakes, steering etc.

Out the door the price was about the same as a typical Dodge Monaco, Oldsmobile 88 or Mercury full size car. So, it was not so much the cost, which was that of a medium priced sedan. It wasn't the kind of car anybody wanted except for drag racers.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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Well, I guess this went farther than I had intended. I still cannot believe that they would ask these amounts as a starting price and yes, I do wonder about someone who would pay that amount for any of them. That's me. I know that others view items differently and of course there are many who see $100,000 as I see a hundred. Perhaps my sucker remark was uncalled for but I was just overwhelmed by the asking prices. To each his own of course. I am amazed by most of the prices for Auction Cars and many that I see sell in other arenas.

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I am amazed by most of the prices for Auction Cars and many that I see sell in other arenas.

Auctions are a whole different situation. There, it's more about winning than about the price paid. BJ and the like have waaaay too many people with more money than brains. Unfortunately, this makes every seller think his P.O.S. is worth a million bucks. On the other hand, the increasing value of some of these cars has led to greater availability of repro parts for the rest of us.

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You might as well say why pay millions for a Picasso when you can get a picture of Marilyn Monroe painted on velvet for $49.95.

There were only a few thousand hemi cars made between 1966 and 1972 and not that many survive. If you want an original, it is going to cost you.

The "suckers" who paid $5000 in 1980, $50000 in 1990 or $250000 in the 2000s are going to end up OK.

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If all you want is a hemi car you can buy the hemi engine brand new from Chrysler for $13,999.99 and a real nice 66 - 72 Mopar for $5000 - $25000 depending on model. Throw in $10,000 for incidentals and you can make your own hemi clone for $30,000 - $50,000.

I bought one of those crate Hemis several years ago and it is a POS, I should have gathered parts and built my own.

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Maybe this is another list of possible areas where the wealthy person mentions to his friend(house guest, whatever) "Look what I picked up the other day, stole it for a cool 1/3 million. One of 2 or 4 or? ever made. Pretty neat Huh?"

Part of the American habit of taking everything to insane extremes. Somebody always has to one up the other guy, and somehow the American economy keeps throwing up enough new mega millionaires that there is no limit on the game.

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