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Dynaflash8

Is there a market for near new radial tires?

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When I was restoring my 1941 Buick Roadmaster I decided to put radial tires on the car.  I don't like the look of them, as they squat, nor do I like the feel of them when parking in the garage. They steer too hard.  Then I had open her surgery and now it looks like maybe six months before I can drive it again because of the hard steering. I'd rather fight the grooves in the roads down here in Florida. I paid $1600+ for five tires and they have about 100 miles on them.  I took the car on a local tour and then drove it two times around town.  I'd like to switch back to original 7.00x15 witewalls when I can raise another $1500 for five of them.  But, it's hard to digest throwing those new radials away.  I worked with Coker on the phone and 820R-15 measured the same width and height as 7.00x15 bias.  So, I have five 820R-15 virtually new tires.  If I made the move to go back to bias tires, does anybody think somebody would be interested in these radials and pay for the shipping?  I don't, but what do I know?  It would be awhile.  I only got permission to drive my new car locally as of yesterday.  I go back to the Cardiologist on the 27th.  Coker will come around with another free shipping deal on bias tires in the next couple of months I'm almost sure.

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Earl, 

 

Whenever you are ready to buy the Coker Bia Ply tires, you can order them through Summit Racing for the same price as direct from Coker but Summit always offers free shipping.

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If you inflate a radial to 40-45 psi it will feel like a bias tire.

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Yes, try high inflation first to ease steering effort.

 

I have to say do not run them higher than the maximum pressure on the sidewall. Eventhough I always put 40 psi in the rear tires (35 psi max) on the rear of my F-150.....

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2 hours ago, padgett said:

If you inflate a radial to 40-45 psi it will feel like a bias tire.

 

Yeah, but putting too much pressure in them means they'll ride like bricks. I know Earl did a lot of research to make sure he got the right-sized tires, but the moment he told me what he bought I knew they would be much too fat. There was a lot of discussion and many options were presented before the purchase, but somehow the wrong tires still got on the car. Coker should know better with their fitment guides and even though diameters and tread width are the same, section width is what makes radials look like radials and why his tires look too fat. There are narrower WWW radials that look right even though on paper they may seem too small. Not that any of that is useful now.

 

I think you should be able to recover maybe 60-70% of the cost to the right people. Those tires are best suited to large post-war cars; they're too fat for anything pre-war. Put them out there and see what happens or maybe a guy with an early '50s Buick or Cadillac might want them. Used tires can be scary for some folks which is what keeps prices down, but people will always leap at a bargain. Make them impossible to refuse.

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Six years ago the surgeon had to open me twice within 8 hours ("We do it nice 'cause we do it twice"). Even if you don't sell the tires you should be swinging on the wheel ahead of the projected date.

 

Ask the cardiologist about alligator breathing exercises. The exercise will keep your rib cage flexible at the cartilage joints, give strength , and help you breathe. Ever notice older people with their necks nearly horizontal. That can be caused by the ribcage joints stiffening up, might help you heal faster as well. Just don't go nuts with it.

 

New York State invented the tar strip two feet in from the shoulder. Pitman arm, tie rod ends, and steering box worm and sector all affect the handling on those surfaces. Really check them thoroughly. And look for pits in the worm gear surface. That is a sign of the hardness wearing off and overlooked at times.

 

Good luck with the healing. I feel better now that I did before I felt bad.

Bernie

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"they'll ride like bricks" - just like a bias tire.

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820R15

 

I don't even understand that size designation, but here it is :

 

http://www.speedwaymotors.com/Coker-Tire-820R15-American-Classic-Bias-Look-Radial-3-25-Whitewall-Tire,104690.html

 

Coker Tire 820R15 American Classic Bias-Look Radial 3.25 Whitewall Tire

 

Position:    Universal
Tire Type:    Passenger Car
Tire Construction:    Radial
Tire Sidewall:    Whitewall
Wheel Diameter:    15 Inch
Tire Size:    820R-15
Tire Diameter Range:    29.00 - 29.99"
Tire Diameter:    29.91"
Rim Width Range:    6.00 - 7.00"
Section Width:    7.62"
Tread Width:    5.6"
Maximum PSI:    35 lbs
Load Capacity:    1920 lbs.
Load Index:    102
Speed Rating:    S
Tubeless Tire:    Yes
MFG. Part #:    700306
Sold in Quantity:    Each
GTIN Code:    00842199100808
Info
These American Classic radials from Coker Tires are made in the USA and are tested to ensure quality as well as durability. True whitewall construction, along with the "pie crust" shoulder and vintage-style tread pattern give this tire the original look, while the radial internals make it the perfect choice for a car that will see plenty of miles. This is a tubeless tire, but keep in mind that tubes are required on some OEM and reproduction wire wheels. You can trust that these tires are ready to hit the road!

Tread Width: 5.60"
Section Width: 7.62"
Overall Diameter: 29.91"
Max Load Capacity: 1920@35PSI
Tubeless
Speed Rating: S 

 

Lucas has the same one for the same price, as well as some other that size.

 

http://www.lucasclassictires.com/820-15_c190.htm

 

820R15 American Classic 3-1/4" Whitewall Radial

 

820R15 American Classic 3-1/4" Whitewall Radial

Bias Ply Radial tire. Great replacement for Cadillac, Lincolns and Packards. 

Construction    Tubeless Poly/Steel
Load Capacity    1920 @ 35 psi
Overall Diameter    29.91"
Tread Width    5.3"
Suggested Rim Width    6-6.5"
 

Manufacturer: American Classic

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)

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I remember when dad's pickup had 7.00-15 tires on it. Those were some tall narrow tires. Truck tires, LT. As far as the aspect ratio, it seemed it must have been taller (higher) than 80-series.

 

Then the pickup got car type radial tires, 215R80-15 and those seemed to have a smaller overall diameter, wider tread. I think I have Bridgestone 235R80-15 on it now.

 

 

Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)

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Its pretty safe to assume 90 on the old sizes that are pre-1965, and specify the rim size rather than the outer diameter. Truck tires may be a bit taller than expected due to the extra plies.

 

These tires on the other hand are a bit weird. They work out to about 7.60-15 with a 95 aspect ratio.

 

The first number is the section width , so something that has a section width of 7.62 isn't an 8.20 no matter how you cut it.

 

They are the correct outer diameter for an 8.20 though, just slightly narrower. Keep in mind that tires take a little liberty even today with the actual size, and 50 years ago they were all over the map. Maybe they made them just a little bit tall/narrow to increase the bias ply illusion. It would also make them more likely to fit in a spare tire well or a sidemount cover.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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(29.91-15)/2 = 7.46 sidewall height

 

7.62 cross section width times 0.95 aspect ratio = 7.24 sidewall height.

 

 

 

 

Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)
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Well, I was going for something they might have actually shot for at design. Yeah, in reality it is closer to 100.....

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16 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Yeah, but putting too much pressure in them means they'll ride like bricks. I know Earl did a lot of research to make sure he got the right-sized tires, but the moment he told me what he bought I knew they would be much too fat. There was a lot of discussion and many options were presented before the purchase, but somehow the wrong tires still got on the car. Coker should know better with their fitment guides and even though diameters and tread width are the same, section width is what makes radials look like radials and why his tires look too fat. There are narrower WWW radials that look right even though on paper they may seem too small. Not that any of that is useful now.

 

I think you should be able to recover maybe 60-70% of the cost to the right people. Those tires are best suited to large post-war cars; they're too fat for anything pre-war. Put them out there and see what happens or maybe a guy with an early '50s Buick or Cadillac might want them. Used tires can be scary for some folks which is what keeps prices down, but people will always leap at a bargain. Make them impossible to refuse.

What size do you recommend then in a radial to replace 7.00x15?  The tires don't look too fat, but they squat and that, plus the hard steering into and out of the garage is what I object to.  I hate the look of the squat.

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15 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

Six years ago the surgeon had to open me twice within 8 hours ("We do it nice 'cause we do it twice"). Even if you don't sell the tires you should be swinging on the wheel ahead of the projected date.

 

Ask the cardiologist about alligator breathing exercises. The exercise will keep your rib cage flexible at the cartilage joints, give strength , and help you breathe. Ever notice older people with their necks nearly horizontal. That can be caused by the ribcage joints stiffening up, might help you heal faster as well. Just don't go nuts with it.

 

New York State invented the tar strip two feet in from the shoulder. Pitman arm, tie rod ends, and steering box worm and sector all affect the handling on those surfaces. Really check them thoroughly. And look for pits in the worm gear surface. That is a sign of the hardness wearing off and overlooked at times.

 

Good luck with the healing. I feel better now that I did before I felt bad.

Bernie

I have almost everything to rebuild the front end.  New springs are paid for and should arrive from Kansas maybe today.  I still need to get a pair of front shocks rebuilt (I have a good set of used ones) by Apple in NY.  But they are too heavy for me to pack and ship yet.  Matt Harwood (above) might have a point.  The car had modern radials on it when I bought it and it did not steer as hard or have that much squat, but that might be because they were narrow whitewalls and it wasn't so obvious.  I still think I want to go back to 7.00x15 bias tires.  I'm also afraid of a ply separation on the rear causing one to blow and ruin one of my skirts.  If only you knew how much money I have in making those Hershey-purchase skirts right.  What they've recommended for my chest is body lotion on the cut.  As yet I may still have to have a shock treatment to get my heart in rythem.  I'll know on the 27th.

 

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)

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On any pre war car, I have always thought that radial tires were a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist. While the idea can be appealing, it creates more potential problems than it theoretically solves. Generally speaking, keeping a car “bone stock” is a good idea. Engineering was better than most people realize by 1925. 

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Earl,

Write to  Rev Roc, they guy who started the thread about "tires for a 1960 Buick"  If he has 15" wheels

your tires would look good on that big customized Buick.  

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"solution to a problem that doesn’t exist" for some price is a consideration.

 

Issue is that as time goes by it gets harder/more expensive to buy OEM tires some of which were "not even safe in the driveway" e.g.a 2PR Bias-Belted.

 

Think "low profile" cane in sometime in the 1950's, radial became available in the 1960s but the first US production use was the MK III in 1969 (my '59 150s used RS5 6.00x16s)

 

I remember the Michelin X with the "stop" tread being popular in south Florida where it rains A Lot.

 

60 series tires became available in about '67 or '68 (remember the Z-28 having E70x15s). I ordered my '70 Buick GS with G70-15 dog-bone Dunlop radials. Back then figured 8,000-10,000 miles from a $100 set of tires.

 

First real problem I remember was the BR-70-13s Firestone 500s that came on my '78 Sunbird.

 

Today I have radials on everything (prefer BFGs nowadays) but again it rains A Lot here (this time of the year its daily in the afternoon).

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How much air is in them? I have not had these particular tires, but if you are seeing "squat" they probably don't have near enough air.

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17 hours ago, Lebowski said:

What size are they, how much do you want for them and where are you located?

They are 820R-15 like what I already posted.  I don't have them for sale yet, it'll be a couple of months before I can drive the car I think, after my open heart surgery.

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2 hours ago, Bloo said:

How much air is in them? I have not had these particular tires, but if you are seeing "squat" they probably don't have near enough air.

I  think I have 40 pounds in them.  Radial tires always squat.  It really shows with these wide whitewalls.  I hate like hell to remove the rear fender skirts.  New 7.00x15  bias tires are a little less than $1600 I think.  When I get well, then I'll look into it.  I haven't asked the doctor when I can drive my two pre-war cars.  The '39 has new bias tires and it looks great and drives okay down here.  I think the bias tires do better when new.  The first picture is the car after repaint, skirts, etc.  The second picture is the car with new tires before repaint, the third picture is as the car arrived.  Maybe a couple of tires have lost some pressure sitting in the garage.  You can see the squat in the second picture, but not the other two.

41 Buick finished 2.JPG

Our 1941 Buick 71 CB.JPG

Our 1941 Buick 71 as bought.JPG

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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Hang in there, Earl. You know all of us are real happy to see you recovering. Do not under any circumstances be tempted to exceed doctors limitations. You've got it made, and will be surprised and relieved at how good you will feel eventually.   -   Carl 

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2 hours ago, Dynaflash8 said:

They are 820R-15 like what I already posted. 

 

That doesn't sound like the size of any radial tire that I've ever heard of. Usually it's 225-70R15 or 215-75R16 or something similar to that. What country were they made in? :(

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15 minutes ago, Lebowski said:

 

That doesn't sound like the size of any radial tire that I've ever heard of. Usually it's 225-70R15 or 215-75R16 or something similar to that. What country were they made in? :(

 

Here is the information on that tire size: https://www.cokertire.com/american-classic-820r15-3-1-4-inch-whitewall.html They are Radials designed to replace a 820x15 Bias Ply tire. 

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