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thinxman

1942 Woody value

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Hello, we inherited a 1942 woody that has been sitting in cold storage for 30+ years.  This car is in pieces and needs love and attention.  Im wondering what the as is value roughly is.  Any numbers would help.

 

Thank you

Tommy

woody front 2.JPG

woody front end and clutter.JPG

woody front end.JPG

woody front with bin.JPG

woody nose.JPG

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The value is roughly  between $500 and $50,000 depending on condition. Yours looks more like the $500 job. If it is complete, not rusted out and you have all the missing parts maybe a few thousand.

 

To turn your car into a $50,000 car would take a complete restoration which would cost over $100,000. This is why projects aren't worth very much no matter how old or rare.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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Just to inform....that is NOT a 1942 Plymouth. It is a 1940 Plymouth. Here is the 1942 Plymouth....COMPLETELY different front end....

1942 Plymouth woody.jpg

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More photos would be needed to help with a rough value.

As a parts car it should be worth  more than $500.

If you have the paper work, can find all or most of the trim and the wood is at least good enough to make patters the price goes up.

Let us know when you dig it out and what part of the world you are in.

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A complete re-wood will be somewhere in the $18 to $22k range, is any wood good? Big question is how is the rest of the body? Plymouths are fairly rare and "Woodie" parts are scarce. All the unique brackets, door latches, etc will be very hard to find if they are missing. Even as a parts car it can be valuable. Finished, in show condition, it would be worth somewhere in the $70 to $100K range. I have Ford "Woodies", so that is what I am basing my estimate on, any Plymouth people out there? If you aren't in a rush to get it done, it could be a nice project.

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thinx, are the pieces of wood in the second picture parts of a door? If you do remove the car from storage, take your time and make sure you get all the parts. Where are you located. 

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As a reference we have been trying to sell a 1949 Olds Woodie project car with the famous Rocket 88 engine in running condition  for well over a year and cannot get even 1 offer at our asking price of $4000 or best offer. Best of luck.

 

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Yours looks more like the $500 job 

 

 

 

pay no mind to that estimate. it is silly.....................

 

hardware alone is worth far more then that.

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I did say "roughly". We still don't know how complete, or incomplete the car is. But I guarantee when a car is disassembled that far parts are missing.

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I agree with Rusty. I know how hard it is to find Ford Woodie parts and Plymouths are scarcer. Scarce = money. For example, I have seen original rain gutters for '41 thru '48 Ford wagons for $2500,  wagon only, rear bumper for $750, door handles for $250 each. As I originally stated, if you are missing any of the small interior metal parts that are  unique to the station wagon you may never find them. I can't remember, but that car may have a wood floor also. In one way thats a plus because the wood floor is a lot easier to replace than metal floors. I'm probably crazy, but I would restore the car, but I do all my own woodwork and mechanicals. I'm looking to do another Woodie, but as I said Ford's are my thing. More pictures!!!

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Tommy,

 

sounds like you should just part it out and make "big" money on the parts, because apparently your car has no value.

 

LOL!

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But the parts value is very strange.  I have a 1936 Cord everything for it is expensive,  but try to sell the parts,  and they hardly bring anything unless someone is in a bind.  

There was a very similar year and probably condition,  though it hadn't been disassembled at all Plymouth Woody for sale (pre war) around here last year or the year before.  Needed to be fully restored but was complete,  not rusty and all the wood was intact.  I didn't examine to say if it needed all new wood or only some,  but they started it at 18G.  I think they were closer to 10G when I stopped seeing it advertised for sale,  so I think it sold.  The exact number,  I'm not sure. If it's complete you could shoot for low teens and hope.  It's all in how good everything is and what it needs. 

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You need to take an inventory of what you have and what is missing. If you are missing things like door hinges, door locks, door handles, strikers and all the little metal do dads that hold the interior wood together you might be in trouble. I surf Woodie sites every day, including E-Bay and occasionally you will see a Ford part, but I have never seen door handles or locks for a Plymouth. It's not about the wood as there are several people out there that specialize in Woodie replacement wood. As I asked in post 4, where are you located? 

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The wild card here, is: what's the condition of the wood body?  I think we're all assuming it's rotted, therefore a full restoration ($$$) is needed.  In that case, no one will want to offer you very much for the car, since he already will have a ton of money to spend on it.

 

But what if a substantial portion of the wood is still decent?  Maybe a good woodworker could replace the few rotted pieces, refinish the rest, and someone would have a nice (not trophy-winning) car to drive around, for fun.  In this way the car would be worth more than just a "shell" in which to sink tens of thousands of dollars.

 

Why not clear away some of that junk in front of it, haul it out into the sunlight, and take some good photos of the wooden body?   At the same time you could take an inventory of the hardware and other components that are unique to Plymouths, and -- if nothing else -- will add to the value of the wagon as a "parts car" for restoring another Plymouth woodie. 

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There are some wood pieces laying in front of it that looks alot like parts for it.  If so and they are disassembled that's not a good sign that it's good.  You usually don't disassemble the wood unless you are replacing pieces of it. 

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What the hell cars is cars parts is parts and collectors is nuts. All we have to do is glance at a bad photo and can tell to the penny what a car is worth, then next day Jay Leno will come around with a trailer and a picnic basket full of $100 bills. Isn't that how it works.

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or Rusty, we can tell newbies that their cars are worthless, and get "deals" for ourselves and kill the hobby....

 

is that how it should be?

 

fella came on here asking for an honest answer- not to be lowballed by thievery.

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No response from the OP? This looks like another one of those "one post wonders".

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3 hours ago, mercer09 said:

or Rusty, we can tell newbies that their cars are worthless, and get "deals" for ourselves and kill the hobby....

 

is that how it should be?

 

fella came on here asking for an honest answer- not to be lowballed by thievery.

All the hopeless hope in the world. How are we supposed to figure out what a car is worth from a few bad pictures and almost no information? What is a rough condition parts car worth? I don't see you rushing to buy it, or even offering an opinion on its value.

Would you give more than $500 for what you can see in the pictures and based on the information given? What makes you think the missing parts are even there? What is it worth if it was stripped and the parts sold, discarded or lost 30 years ago? So many questions and so few answers.

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Here are a couple Plymouth Woodies to think about...

 

1950 sold for $18K US (no reserve) at the RM/Sothebys Hershey auction in October 2017.

 

1940 in the Hershey 2017 Car Corral, unsold on the Friday at $80K asking.

 

 

F32 Lot136 50 Plymouth woodie.jpg

G12 Corral 40 Plymouth woodie $80k.jpg

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Are they Pushing the 1950 in the photo?  It almost looks like it.  Even with a blown motor,  that 50 Looks like a good deal at 18, though I can't see the lower body.  Styling wise,  I would have to think a pre war Plymouth woody would be a little more desirable than a post war and especially the 1949or 1950 Versions. 

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They were pushing the '50 off the stage as they did with every lot (except, IIRC, the Yellowstone Bus). Every lot was driven onto the stage except the horse drawns, a Stanley, and an Orient Buckboard.

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Do they push them off to avoid any chance of having something mechanical fail since the car now has a new owner and don't want to be responsible for it?  I seem to remember a while back some car caught on fire after the auction ended when they started it to drive it off the block.  It was probably an argument after that to see who paid for the damages as the new owner wouldn't have insurance on it and since it was officially sold,  the old owner's insurance might not pay for it.  Does anyone know the reason? 

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