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Jon37

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  1. Is that rust on the roof, or is it the original Texas Tan showing through the Honey Cream?
  2. If someone has space on a trailer that's headed north from Charlotte (either Rte. 81 or 95), and has extra room, I have a NOS bumper that could use a "lift"! It's lightweight (1985 era, so plastic) but oversized (5-1/2 ft. x 2 ft. not counting the carton). Needs to be picked up at National Parts Depot just outside Charlotte. I could arrange to meet you anywhere between the Washington Beltway and Winchester. No particular time frame involved, but I'd like to get the item before the end of the year. I'm told that the bumper is too large for UPS or FedEx shipping, so I'm trying
  3. A delightful day with an impressive turnout of antique cars, trucks and motorcycles! The AACA officials who organized this show are to be congratulated, as well as all those who labored to bring it off!
  4. You may want to consider joining the Hudson club for technical and parts support: https://www.hetclub.org/ . They maintain two online forums and a Facebook page where you can quick help. Because this Hudson was built by the newly-formed American Motors Corporation, you may find you can obtain certain parts through AMC and Nash parts vendors, as well as through Hudson parts vendors.
  5. Each car uses a specific battery "group", which stands for a particular voltage and physical size. The most commonly available six volt battery groups nowadays are Group 1 or Group 2 but if you search around you can find a few less-common ones being reproduced, like 2L. Here's a short article about battery Groups, from an old Hemmings Motor News: https://www.hemmings.com/stories/article/6-volt-batteries I don't know which group you would use in a 1938 Dodge. You will have to research that. Probably either Group 1 or Group 2. Hear are the physical sizes of Group 1 and Group 2
  6. I am not sure what your question is. You have no engine, so you can't learn the engine number. How about the body serial number -- have you found that yet? (I believe that it may be stamped into the rear spring bracket on the right side (the passenger side, at least in the U.S.!)
  7. If you simply need to verify the car exists (and you don't need someone to do a complicated inspection), you might try the local AACA region. Contact the president and ask if anyone in the local club might do you a favor and check out the car. Here is the website of the Gateway City Region, which is centered in the St. Louis area, I believe: https://gharris7.wixsite.com/gateway Another thought would be to contact the local chapter of whatever car club represents the make of car you're hoping to buy. Possibly the members would be happy to take a look at the car that a fellow ent
  8. Yeah -- let's just get some confirmation of this, from the lips of an AACA official, before we make assumptions.
  9. Thanks, I'll assume it's just someone's misunderstanding unless informed otherwise!
  10. A friend who's registered his car at the AACA car show on the 10th, said that he'd heard that only show car owners are allowed to attend. I cannot believe that's true. I assume it's an unfounded rumor. Everyone's welcome to attend the show....right?
  11. A friend who's registered his car at the AACA car show on the 10th, said that he'd heard that only show car owners are allowed to attend. I cannot believe that's true. I assume it's an unfounded rumor. Everyone's welcome to attend the show....right?
  12. Parting out 600 vehicles, all-Mopar. Open by appointment only. Open Tuesday - Friday 9am-5pm Satuday 10am-4pm Pacific Time Sunday - Monday Closed. 46827 SE Wildcat Mt. Dr., Sandy, OR., 97055 503-668-7786 Video: https://youtu.be/JgLCGnyepdc
  13. 3077 Memory Lane / I-35 North Denton Tx 76207-4919 Webpage: http://www.ctcautoranch.com Phone: (940) 482-3007 E-mail address: ctcautoranch@ctcautoranch.com Advertises 3,000 American cars, 1940's to 1980's. See website.
  14. Wayfarer, I'm not sure there IS a fuse block on cars as early as yours. Generally, fuse holders were wired into the individual circuits feeding radio, heater, etc. Some manufacturers put circuit breakers or glass fuses on the switch itself (Hudson did this on their headlight switch, for example, in the 30's, 40's and early 50's). As to turn signal flashers, try looking up under the dashboard. To avoid contortions, use a small mirror and flashlight so you can sit in the front seat and see the reflected underside of the dash.
  15. You ARE disconnecting the ground strap from the battery whenever you're not working on the car. Right?
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