JV Puleo

My 1910 Mitchell "parts car" project

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Posted (edited)

While I'm waiting for some pieces of aluminum I assembled the oil manifold. The first step was to solder a threaded bushing into one end.

 

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The bushing was a little long (intentionally) so I then put the entire piece in the lathe to face it off. When doing this it is always a good idea to work from the inside out because you will inevitably create a little burr on the end and it is much easier to take it off the outside than the inside.

 

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I still got a small burr which can be a problem because you can't thread the piece in and it isn't easy to clear it. To do so, I used a big countersink to put a chamfer on the inside edge. I probably should have done this first.

 

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With that done, I soldered the pressure relief valve into the other end. The goop you see here is heat blocking putty.

 

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Then I screwed in the oil tube fittings and soldered them in place.

 

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My friend Mike West made a suggestion that I'm going to incorporate into the system - a separate hand pump to get oil pressure before the engine is started. To mount is, I'm making a little piece that will slide over the pump tube from this piece of Naval bronze prop shaft - something I bought cheaply on ebay because the surface is so corroded. I've had trouble working this stuff before and this piece happens to be a part I gave up on. It just happens to be suitable for this job so I gave it another try,.This time I did much better. My problems with this material were particularly frustrating because I've used this stuff before but could not remember how I worked it.  I made several pieces for the B&S milling machine with it.

 

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After you've removed the corroded layer, it is very nice bronze.

 

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Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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10 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

The bushing was a little long (intentionally) so I then put the entire piece in the lathe to face it off. When doing this it is always a good idea to work from the inside out because you will inevitably create a little burr on the end and it is much easier to take it off the outside than the inside.

 

Thanks for the tip, these sort of tips are very useful to us who are learning machining.

 

Joe, I think you need an edit on "The goop you see here is beat blocking putty."

I was racking my brains trying to work out what it meant, then I twigged 'Heat Blocking Putty' it's just what I need for my soldering on the Humberette radiator. I found it in the UK from Frosts, they call it Cold Front. I remember using it back in the 70's when I was welding with Oxy/Acetylene, I didn't realise it was still available..

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This piece is a threaded collar that will hold the auxiliary hand pump to a bracket mounted on the subframe. This time I thought I'd knurl it first. In this case, I did it on a mandrel held between centers because of the amount of pressure that will have to be exerted to make the knurling wheels cut.

 

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It came out pretty good and because I'm reducing the diameter on one end I didn't have to worry about where the knurl stopped.

 

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I then flipped it around and turned most of the diameter down to 1-1/2" with a relief for the thread - which will be 1-1/2-18 - chosen because I have a tap for that size and, with the thin wall of this piece you want a fine thread.

 

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In order to go on with this, I need three more threading gages. Two for 1-1/4-20 and one in 1-1/2-18. I'm making those out of aluminum which isn't the ideal choice but I have it and these will only be used a few times. If this were a production environment, you'd want to use steel. It's fairly common for me to use these more than once but if I live to be 100 I still won't be able to wear them out.

 

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I finished both the blanks... they still have to be bored out and threaded.

 

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The smaller one was made from another fixture I used for the intake manifold so this is its second incarnation as a tool.

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Posted (edited)

I continued on with the threading gages today. This is going to be the internal gage for the pump caps. I need to make this one of steel because I'll be holding the caps in the lathe to knurl them and I want it as strong as I can make it. The center is reamed to 7/8" - rather than explain why - you'll see when I make the caps. I took a chance and used some "mystery metal" I had 0 probably an old piece of mill shafting. I was concerned it wouldn't thread well but this time I got lucky.

 

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Here's the finished piece, threaded 1-1/4-20. Because the pump tube has a wall thickness of .065 it is critical to use a fine thread.

 

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Then I bored out the larger of the two external gages. This one is threaded 1-1/2-18 so the hole size is 1.450.

 

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To my relief, it tapped quite easily. These big taps can be a PIA - another reason for using aluminum. It's soft enough that it is much easier to tap.

 

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So, two down and one to go. The tubing still hasn't arrived so if I finish the 2nd external gage I'll get on with the caps.

 

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This is a classic example of taking as much time making the tools as it takes to make the part.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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I completely forgot that it takes hours for this old reciprocating saw to cut a 2" bar of bearing bronze. Likely the blade is dull but the very properties that make this bronze good for bearings make it a pain in the neck to saw. Luckily I got called away for another job and just left the saw running.

 

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When I got back, I threaded the collar that will hold the hand pump to the subframe.

 

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The threads fit the gage just fine.

 

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By this time the saw had finished one piece so I put it in the lathe to bore. When that was done, and the saw still running, I decided to thread it.

 

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This fit well as well... and the saw only finished the second piece just as I finished the threading job.

 

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So, I'll use these threaded pieces as my gage and forget about the aluminum one. The tubing arrived this afternoon so I can keep on with this until it's done.

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I finished making the bodies of the end caps this morning...

 

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I'll make the end of the caps now. For one of them, I need a piece of bronze 1-1/2" long so I put it in the saw and let it run.

 

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While it was sawing, I cut off a piece of tubing.

 

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And, because the saw was still running, threaded one end.

 

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The caps screw on fine but I'm having a new problem. For some reason, the cap won't go past the last thread. I'm guessing that relief isn't deep enough but it's tricky working with this tubing. The wall thickness is only .065 and the threads are about .035 deep. I'm thinking I should have used a finer thread but it is too late to change that. If I have to, I'll find some tubing with a thicker wall. That will decrease the volume of the pump a little but this is only to pump up oil pressure before I start the engine so a few extra strokes with it are inconsequential. If this one works out, I'll get about 5 cubic inches of oil per stroke so it shouldn't take too many to fill the oil system.

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Joe, you are one talented guy! I am amazed at not only your machining skills, but your ingenuity in fabricating fixtures to hold the part you are making. The sad part is that once our generation is gone, there is no one to pick up the ball and run with it. I'll bet there aren't a dozen young people in America that can do your quality of work. Most kids today don't know an end mill from a reamer. Please keep posting pictures of your incredible workmanship!!!

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Those old power hacksaws are great for cutting while you go and work on something else, slow but steady! I've got a Marvel 9a myself.

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Posted (edited)

I'm not so sure though that might just be my natural optimism showing. Remember, I'm almost completely self-taught and, for the most part, the shop has only been assembled over the past 6 years. I've hardly ever paid more than scrap price for a machine so the argument that it's too expensive to do doesn't' hold up. It does take time, determination and interest in the subject – and the willingness to read a lot of old books but I suspect there are young  (or younger) guys out there who are doing all that. In fact, I know at least one in my neighborhood and he's a car guy too. I wonder if there were ever many guys doing this sort of thing - there certainly weren't any I knew when I was first involved with antique cars 40 (nearer 50) years ago. Probably 80 or 90% of what you see here is stuff I've never done before.

 

And yes, the beauty of the old reciprocating saw is that you turn it on and it turns itself off when it's done. It's only a problem when you don't anticipate how long it will take.

 

jp

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

I started the day by threading the other end of the brass tube. I had a problem with this threading job... in both cases, the cap would not screw on all the way so the relief for the end of the thread showed. I suspect I did not cut it deep enough but I was very reluctant to cut it any deeper because I was already half-way through the wall of the tube.

 

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So, I decided to counterbore the caps.

 

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This worked just fine. In fact, if I had thought about it, I would have made the caps this way.

 

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I admit I had second thoughts about the use of bronze for the caps and brass for the tube, but I was using what I already had. Then I thought to look at the original hand air pump I have - and discovered it has a brass tube with bronze mountings so I guess I've accidentally done it the right way.

 

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The next step was to make the inner part of the top cap. This one is more complicated than any I've done before because it will incorporate a bushing to guide the rod in the center and have a threaded socket on top so that the pump can be secured when not in use.

 

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It was drilled and reamed to 11/16.

 

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I don't have an expanding arbor in that size so I turned the diameter down to 1-1/4 (the major diameter of the thread) on a mandrel, Then turned one end down to 1-1/8" which allowed me to hold it in a collet so I could face off the other side.

 

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This end was now turned down to just over 13/16. A bushing will eventually be pressed in here while the other end will be threaded 3/4-16.

 

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Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Joe, you want to talk machinery. In my City there were several large factories that went under. All of the equipment was put up for auction. I have a friend who's shop has 3 phase electric. When he went to one of the auctions, nobody was bidding on most of the three phase  equipment. He purchased several machines, for less than $1000. Cost him more to have them moved. I purchased a lot of two Starrett vernier calipers, Starrett, 1", 2", 3" and 4" micrometers and a Starrett beam level all for $100.

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Sounds good to me. I also have 3-phase power which allows me to buy machines that the average hobbyist passes up. I know what it's like to pay more for the moving - I've got machines that were "free" if I took them away.

 

Today I finished up the upper cap for the pump. First, I threaded it ... because the thread comes off both sides I did it on centers and even thought to put the body of the cap on the mandrel with it so I wouldn't have to take it off to check. The advantage to threading on centers is that, unlike using a chuck or a collet, you can take the part off and put it back as long as you put the lathe dog back in the same hole.

 

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This is what the inside of the cap is supposed to look like. The hole in the center will get a bushing for the pump rod.

 

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I then threaded the big end... this will allow me to lock the pump down when not in use.

 

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And chamfered the threaded hole to prevent any damage to the of the thread by over enthusiastic pumping.

 

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Then on to my camp stove to solder the end in.

 

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And back in the lathe to take a fine finish cut and square up the interface between the two parts. I then knurled the body of the cap.

 

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Done... (except for that bushing). I started on the pump shaft also but I'll save that for tomorrow.

 

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10 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

. . . . because the thread comes off both sides I did it on centers and even thought to put the body of the cap on the mandrel with it so I wouldn't have to take it off to check. The advantage to threading on centers is that, unlike using a chuck or a collet, you can take the part off and put it back as long as you put the lathe dog back in the same hole.

 

JP, another very useful tip for us 'learner' machinists.

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I got quite a lot done today. The first item was the pump shaft, threading the end 1/2-20. You could do this with a die but I've never been able to get a perfectly straight thread using one so I'd rather just single point it.

 

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I also made this piece up - it's just a piece of 7/8 brass bar, drilled and tapped to 1/2-20

 

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I then screwed the brass piece on to the rod and turned it down to 3/4". This is the only way you can be sure the OD of the added piece is concentric with the OD of the rod.

 

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This is how it came out...

 

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While the lathe was set up for turning, I also started on the center for the bottom end cap. It has to be drilled 7/16" - the hole size for a 1/4" NPT tap.

 

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I then discovered that I don't have a 7/16 expanding arbor but I do have this fixture I made to make the tops of the lifter caps which happen to have a 7/16" hole in the center. This allowed me to turn the end down to 1-1/4"

 

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And thread it 1-1/4-20

 

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While the machine was set up for threading, I also threaded the brass piece on the end of the pump rod.

 

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While all this was going on, I soldered the center into the end cap and roughed out the brass plunger knob that will go on the end of the rod. Tomorrow I'll finish those up.

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This is what that thread is supposed to do. I had a little trouble fitting it because there was a burr on the thread. I forced a 3/4-16 nut over the burr and then lapped the thread until it was smooth.

 

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I used the nut as a lock nut to hold the piece firmly on the pump shaft, faced it off and turned it round. Nothing was square - probably the result of starting with a small piece and the vagarities of a 3-jaw chuck. I think it was almost .050 out of round.

 

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But by working off the thread on the shaft, everything is straight and square now.

 

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I have to consider how I'm going to finish this... I put it on the camp stove to solder but for some reason, the solder was balling up. I suspect I didn't get it hot enough. In any case, I decided to cheat and use Loctite which has the added advantage of being able to get the piece off if something else goes wrong.

 

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While the piece was cooling, I went on to finish the bottom cap.

 

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Taking a small cut of the surface to true it up and knurling.

 

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then I threaded the hole 1/4 NPT for a flare fitting. I started the thread in the lathe to get it straight but it is really awkward to thread that way so since the 3-jaw from the rotary table is out and clamped to the mill table I finished it there.

 

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That is about it for the body of the pump. I am my own worst critic but even I have to admit this has come pretty good so far. My greatest success comes from the fact that it doesn't look "new" at all.

 

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20 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

My greatest success comes from the fact that it doesn't look "new" at all.

I promise not to let anybody know!

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Thanks, Mike! I actually finished the knob but I don't like it. The crown is too high and the diameter too small. In some other context, I might still use it but this has come out so good that I can't bear to do that so today I'm making it again.

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This morning I started over to make the knob. This time I'm making the entire thing of C360 free machining brass. I'm such a cheapskate that I hesitated to use this stuff- but what in the world am I keeping it for if not this sort of thing. Here I'm making the threaded center again. The good part of doing something over is that you get to fix things you hadn't anticipated the first time around so I don't begrudge the extra time.

 

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One of the by-products of buying most nuts and bolts from McMaster Carr is that you end up buying 25 when you need 2. In this case, it paid off because I just happened to have a bag of 3/4-16 lock nuts. I'd forgotten I had these so didn't use them the first time.

 

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This is my trick for centering a piece that is too thin to get a good surface to indicate. This is not the piece I'll be using, it's the larger piece that will go back on the shelf but it is the same diameter so IU put it in the lathe and indicated it. I then loosen two of the jaws and put the other piece in. If the hole I was going to drill was smaller I'd reverse the jaws but when I did that there wasn't clearance for the drill. This will get you within .005 to .010 - it isn't perfect but since I'm removing a lot of the diameter it makes no difference.

 

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I faced it and turned it down, using the pump shaft with its threaded collar as the mandrel. That way, everything will be concentric.

 

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And this time I decided to put the knurl on first. The last time, because the knob was already smaller than I wanted, I didn't take a light cut to make sure it was perfectly concentric. A big mistake - the knurl did not come out uniform and it's quite hard for me to knurl a narrow surface. Most of this will be removed tomorrow but what is left will be just about perfect.

 

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It was also important to get the center into the end of the pump shaft. The pressure generated by the knurling tool will cause the workpiece to deflect – n ot much but it does make a difference in how it looks when finished.

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This morning I turned the knob down using the rounded tool you see. I wanted a radius on the inside edge.

 

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When I got the thickness to almost where I wanted it I soldered the threaded center portion into the knob. This time it worked perfectly so I've no idea what I did wrong yesterday.

 

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Then set up the radius turning tool to put a radius on the projecting part of the knob. I would really have liked to cut a radius on the entire top of the knob - that would have been more authentic looking but the largest radius this tool will turn is not big enough.

 

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It came out like this...

 

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And screwed into the top of the pump. The kn ob on the right is the one I made two days ago.

 

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With that done, I started on the bracket that will hold the pump to the subframe. When finished it's only about 4" long but I'll cut it down later. The extra length makes it easier to hold securely in the vise.

 

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After drilling a larger enough hole for the boring head, I bored it out to 1.450.

 

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And set it up to thread.

 

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But, I'm tired and I'll take my own advice and stop before I make an error. The bushing for the top of the pump also arrived at the end of the day so I'm plenty to do tomorrow.

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Stopping is one of the best lessons.  The number of times I wished I had stopped probably equals the number of screw-ups ;)

 

You progress is steady and inspiring.  I long to get back in the shop but seeing your journey does take away some of the disappointment of not being in the shop.  I keep thinking I'm close and then something else comes up.   Such is life!  

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It is...

In a week or two I am going to have to slow down on the car and go back to making windows for the house - and then there is the hot water heater to replace and much of the plumbing which has frozen and burst so many times it's now a mass of repairs. I won't stop - primarily because I do the car stuff during the regular work week - but I won't be able to make progress as fast as I have been. I would like to get on to the water pump. that will be next after the oiling and lifters are fully sorted.

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Well, I for one will miss your regular posts and excellent photos of the work, when you go back to working on the house. I too, pack up working in the garage or shed when I become tired. The only problem is that as I get older it's earlier and earlier in the day that I have to pack up!

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The threading went well. I also counterbored the hole to eliminate the problem of the bronze fitting screwing in all the way. Because I never moved the workpiece from the vise, the boring head did a perfect job.

 

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The next problem was to mill a radius on the end of this bracket. For that, I need to be able to center it on the rotary table and I confess I had to really think about how to do that. In the end, I used the unfinished threading gage I'd made a few days ago, threading it on the outside rather than the inside. The hole in the center is a reamed 1" and I have a 1" pilot I made for the rotary table to slip it over. This gave me a lot of trouble. The thread galled, it wouldn't screw in all the way and I was extremely reluctant to fool with the threads in the bracket because the bronze collar fit so well.

 

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I did get it to work but had to run out to buy two 10mm bolts. The rotary table is Japanese and metric and all the bolts I had were either too long or too short.

 

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The milling took half the time the setup did.

 

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Then the end was cut off...

 

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And a flat, 1/4" deep milled on the bottom to fit over the sub frame.

 

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It isn't done yet but this is how the pump will mount on the engine.

 

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I like the way of rounding the ends of the aluminium bar. It certainly beats shaping the ends by eye, on the grinder and linisher! I must 'dig out' my rotary table and attempt to use it. I look forward every morning to reading your posts.

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Posted (edited)

I almost finished the pump today... first I pressed the bushing into the top cap.

 

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Then, because the bushings are intended to be very slightly too small - to allow for fitting, I lapped it with a barrel lap. I really like these - they allow you to get a fit you could never get with a reamer.

 

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With that done I measured the pump shaft and drilled and tapped 1/4-20

 

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for a 5/16 shoulder screw. This will hold the pump leathers in place.

 

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Then I finished the bracket by milling a curved fillet in the edges. This is purely cosmetic but I think give the piece a much more finished look. Note the set screw collar on the end mill. This is a stop because I will have to take the end mill out of the machine to indicate the other edges and I want to put it back exactly where it was. If you don't do this, it's practically impossible to get the depth of cut absolutely identical which will show on the edges where the two cuts overlap.

 

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I located one edge and milled it, then turned the piece around in the vise and milled from the other direction.

 

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I also drilled it for a single 3/8 bolt which will go through the subframe. I'm going to use an acorn nut on this that will match the nuts on the lifters...and besides, I have a box of them.

 

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The next step was to read the collar that holds the pump. This proved more difficult than I'd anticipated - I suspect because the reamer is a little dull. I got it done but in doing so got the collar so tight I had to go out and buy a big pair of channel locks to get it out (wrapped with leather) but I still put a little nick in the knurl.

 

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And last, I drilled a very small hole in the upper end of the tube to let the air out when pumping, Otherwise, you are pumping in both directions. I have an old pump with the hole in the cap but the cap here is so complicated that I dreaded trying to drill a hole in it.

 

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With any luck, tomorrow I'll fit the pump leathers (which, oddly enough came from England) and try it.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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