JV Puleo

My 1910 Mitchell "parts car" project

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Posted (edited)

I made the test vanes today and it occurred to me that I never illustrated this step because I'd left the camera in the office. The vanes are made from  5/16 x 5/8 flat stock. The first step was to make 4 vanes exactly the same length. I did this two pieces at a time with a 5/8 square collet.

 

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After one end is finished square, I used this collet stop to set the depth and a stop on the bed of the lathe to set the tool.

 

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The result is 4 pieces of identical length.

 

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Then, because they are too thick, I milled them down to within about .015 of the finished thickness. This was necessary because to get the fit I want the finished size is .258 - slightly more than a 1/4"

 

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Then the finished thickness was arrived at with the surface grinder.

 

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Here is the finished piece in the holding fixture. There is still more to do but I'm getting close.

 

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I used soft point set screws to hold the vane and not mar the finish. The springs arrived today but I'm still waiting on a couple of 1/8" end mills to get the flat bottom hole but may do an experiment tomorrow with an end mill I have to see if my measurements work.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)

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I tested the fixture this morning and it worked perfectly.

 

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But...the drill press doesn't run out as much as I'd thought so the 1/8" diameter springs are tight in the 1/8" holes. Since I can't easily make the holes only a few thousandths larger, I've ordered some .120 diameter springs. I'll do another test when they arrive but I am now confident this is going to work.

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LOL, when you need a little runout you don't get it and you're not sure if you should be disappointed or proud.  Maybe you could buy a new drill press from your local big box store... you'd be SURE to get some runout... like a lot of runout. ;)

 

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You are pretty darn handy and with good results.

Al

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2 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

LOL, when you need a little runout you don't get it and you're not sure if you should be disappointed or proud.  Maybe you could buy a new drill press from your local big box store... you'd be SURE to get some runout... like a lot of runout. ;)

 

 

It is funny...if I remember correctly, I rebushed the spindle. Perhaps I should revisit my repairs on this machine. I did them years ago when I was nowhere near as well equipped - or had as much experience as I do now. It is a nice size for fussy work. I'll have to think of a way to get variable speeds - can you put something like a rheostat on a 110 motor? (My knowledge of electricity, aside from wiring 3-phase machines, is almost totally lacking.)

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9 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

 

It is funny...if I remember correctly, I rebushed the spindle. Perhaps I should revisit my repairs on this machine. I did them years ago when I was nowhere near as well equipped - or had as much experience as I do now. It is a nice size for fussy work. I'll have to think of a way to get variable speeds - can you put something like a rheostat on a 110 motor? (My knowledge of electricity, aside from wiring 3-phase machines, is almost totally lacking.)

 

I think a rheostat will hurt the motor if it does run.  There are, however, single phase VFD (variable frequency drives).  I'm looking to get one for my mill and possibly the lathe as well. 

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7 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

 

I think a rheostat will hurt the motor if it does run.  There are, however, single phase VFD (variable frequency drives).  I'm looking to get one for my mill and possibly the lathe as well. 

Yes, VFD is the way  to control an AC motor. Not cheap but the best way. Had a Bridgeport brand vertical miller offered to me with “some” tooling. I didn’t need it,  but couldn’t pass it up for $700. Turns out it’s a variable speed with power feed on the x axis. The tooling included all kind of Starrett instruments, boring heads, fly cutters, expandable reamer sets, right and left hand dies/taps, two vices, etc., etc.. The tooling included was everything they had in two 7’ tall, 36” wide metal cabinets! Told my neighbor he could have it before I even saw it so he agreed to take it. Looking at the value of used tools and accessories, he got over $7,500 worth of stuff for $700. Best thing is I can borrow any of it I need! 

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What about if the rheostat was in parallel with the motor, so the motor still had the same voltage. It would just reduce the current to the motor and thus slow it.

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Posted (edited)

The new springs only arrived at the end of the day so I found myself looking for a reasonably short job to do while waiting. I decided to modify the aluminum fan I bought from a fellow forum member. It is too big to go in my lathe so I set it up in the rotary table to mill off the flat belt pulley.

 

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It went quite well. This old cast aluminum is full of blowholes but it machines quite easily.

 

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I only took off about half of the pulley because I wanted to use it to hold the fan while boring the center out. I made a plug that fit the original hole in the center as a centering fixture. Since this is a casting, only the machined surfaces are reliable.

 

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With it centered, I lowered the table and set up the boring head. All this stuff just fit with very little room to spare.

 

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Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)

I bored the fan out to slightly more than 2-1/2". I will make another piece to press into this that will include ball bearings to rotate on and the new fan pulley.

 

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I would have finished this today but as I was making the last cut my neighbor, from the foundry next door, came in. They have a machine down I took a look at and offered to make the parts needed to get it back in operation. I did set the fan back up in the rotary table. Tomorrow I'll remove the remainder of the flat belt pulley.

 

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Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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I finished machining the old fan this morning, taking off the piece of the old pulley that I left to hold it with.

 

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I'll now make a piece to press into this that will hold a pair of ball bearings and include the new V belt pulley. Tomorrow I'll revisit the oil pump vanes. The new springs came in last night and fit the holes perfectly so I just need to adjust how deep the holes will be and I can finish the vanes and test the pump again.

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Joe, you may be pleased to hear that I am using the Archdale milling machine a lot more now, thanks to your help with your tips and your excellent posts. I am machining up the clamping parts for the mechanical Wicksteed saw that I purchased. They had been abused and butchered over the years. I am getting more confidence every time I use the mill. The old big lathe is also being used more and seems a lot easier and nicer to use than the Myford I have been using for the last 10 to 15 years. Thanks again for all your help and encouragement.

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That sounds good to me. I think you'll find those big machines almost relaxing to use compared to the small ones...you quickly get accustomed to the fact that they are so much more capable.

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Posted (edited)

For some reason, these photos are out of focus. Perhaps I got too close to the piece. My cheap "point & shoot" shop camera is pretty limited and designed for outside snapshots. Nevertheless, here is the test vane with the spring in place.

 

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The vanes were center drilled, then drilled with a #31 (.120) drill then finished with a .125 end mill to give them a flat bottom. I've no idea if that is important but it wasn't much extra work to do.

 

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I then reassembled the pump with the springs in place. These are the lightest springs I could find. The pump worked as I expected it would but when I started it up I got what looked like a very fine bronze residue in the oil. I took it apart again but could find nothing that looked threatening although the rotation of the vanes is putting a high polish on the bronze liner. Very likely it is just polishing the interface between the liner and the vanes. Even though I honed it and polished the vanes they were not as smooth as they would be after running it. It does seem to run smoother this time but the only reliable test will be to run it for hours or even days.

 

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It is actually running in the photo above... the camera has such a fast shutter speed that it stops the action. One encouraging feature is that I can suck oil up and pump it by simply turning the pump by hand, suggesting that it works at a very low RPM. This time there are no gaskets in the pump. I'm relying on the lapped surfaces to provide the seal and that seems to be justified. The nearest thing to a leak is at the back but I have not inserted the brass cap that goes there - not wanting to have to take it out if I have to do anything to the bushing.

 

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Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Needing only hand rotation to pick-up and pump is very good.  Probably an example of what precision machining does to a simple and robust design. 

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I may put a one-way valve in the oil input line so that once primed it will stay. The drawback is that in draining the oil, I won't be draining it out of the pump but I don't see myself letting the oil ever get so dirty that that will make a difference.

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I have experimented with an external oil pump on a brass era car that originally had drip feed total loss oiling.  The system required non return valves and they continually clogged with dirty oil.   I reverted to the original set up because of this problem.

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I don't see dirty oil as a problem. By the time this engine is completed everything inside will be just about antiseptically clean. I probably will have a bit of leakage but that is to be expected. What sort of valve did you use? This pump is drawing the oil up in 10 revolutions or less. It may be more when on the engine because it may have to draw it a little higher but I hardly know of a conventional gear pump that is much better. I am considering a separate hand pump to prime the system when it is cold and perhaps that is a better alternative.

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The non return valve was a simple ball and spring type

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Posted (edited)

I can see where that could be a problem and I appreciate the warning. I was planning to use a "swing check valve" ...In any case, I will test it before using it.

(Edit): As far as I can tell, the swing valves have a much larger opening and require less suction to work. I haven't bought one yet so I won't be able to judge until I do but I was very leery of the "ball & spring" valves for this purpose. I think it would be safer to have no valve at all rather than run the risk of it sticking.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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I've not run the pump for 7-1/2 hours with no noticeable change in its performance. I will probably keep this up all week just to be certain it is ok. I then have to take it apart and do a final lap on the pieces and insert the dowel pins that will make it easier to position the pump body. While it was running I started on the pressure relief valve and connection to the oil filler. This is a piece of 1" brass bar, drilled and reamed to 5/8".

 

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Then threaded. The unthreaded part will be soldered into the oil manifold.

 

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These strangely out of focus pictures don't do it any favors but you can just make out the threaded part.

 

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And this is how it goes together. The banjo fitting will be connected to a copper line that will return excess oil to the sump.

 

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I still have to make a cap for the end and the internal parts.

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I ran the pump for another 5 hours today...so far so good.

And kept working on the oiling system. First I drilled the oil passages that go inside the banjo fitting.

 

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It doesn't show well here but I also pressed a 3/8 x 5/8 bushing into one end of the relief valve. This is intended to keep the plunger from sliding into the oil manifold.

 

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I couldn't resist the opportunity to do a rough assembly and see if everything fits. First is the oil filter housing...

 

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Then the entire oil manifold...

 

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and the relief valve...

 

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Everything fit so I started on the cap for the end of the relief valve.

 

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bored out to .950 - the hole size for a 1" x 20 thread.

 

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