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1934 Dodge Full Body Off Restoration


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It is more noticeable on the passenger side isn't it. The hole where the rear bumper bolt goes through was completely torn open which probably explains why the rear bumper looks a little worse for wear and the bumper irons are bent upwards.

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Ok, so after I finished all the panels I took one load at a time to the sandblaster to get the inside of all panels blasted and etch primed. I didn't take many shots of the panels but have a nice one of the inside of the main body ( before and after ). The blasting did reveal some rusted areas that require repair so when I send it off to the body guy we'll attack each one in turn.

Cheers

Ian

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  • 2 weeks later...

Bit more progress, got the bonnet back from the body shop which had to have a bit of mild work done to it so I temporarily fitted the new hinge that I got on Ebay and even without the paint it came up looking really nice. A this point also I sent off the steering wheel to a company that specialises in them. They put a very faint smoke in it but happy with the result.

Cheers

Ian

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Hey all,

Finally got the Bailey Channel fitted into place.

The steps I used were as follows incase anyone is interested and tackles this.

First using polyeurathane, glue the window to the channel bar making sure the bar and the window are the right way around.

Once dried and using the glass as a template and with both hands, SLOWLY bend the bailey channel to suit. Once this is done you can then insert this in the door and check for the correct length. Remove and set aside.

Remember to put low adheasive masking tape around the painted surface of the door window opening.

Grease the winding mechanism and attach to the inside of the door.

Then wind the winder up so the arm is protruding above the opening in the door.

Next insert the window and glass assembly into the winder arm that is protruding above the opening in the door and gently proceed to wind the window down inside the door while holding and centering it on the way down.

Next insert the Bailey Channel and again gently push evenly down the sides of the glass into the supporting metal channels in the door. Now these will catch at the top of the channels so you will need to tease these into the top of the supporting metal channels. I was able to access this point through the door lock tongue hole in the side of the door. I used a nifty little plastic trim tool from a set I bought on ebay for about $10.

Once the channel has been lowered I again used these tools to gently open up a space between the bailey channel and the door frame so I could put in some dabs of polyeurathane.

Once this is done and pushing the bailey channel so the stainless steel beed aligns up with the door frame I then used 3 quick release clamps to keep one side in place.

This stuff takes approx. a week to reach full strength so you have to wait.

Repeat for the top of the door and then the other side.

After all three have been done and all clamps removed, remove the tape, clean the window and the end result looks pretty good.

It is a long time to wait for each side but I think the end result is worth it.

Also I retapped the holes for the door handle attaching screws as with cleaning, painting etc these were full of muck.

Hope you found this interesting.

Cheers

Ian

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Slight amendment to above. Put the door lock in prior to the bailey channel and after the window otherwise you can't get it around the channel once it's in.....bugger !!!! I learnt the hard way. Had to pull the bottom of the channel out and slip it in that way.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Hey all,

A few more small steps done.

My wife sewed the covers that go over the door lock arms, I guess they were to stop vibration rattles or if they ever touched the glass wouldn't rattle. Also cleaned out the second rear door channel, primed and painted. Its now mounted on the glass with polyeurathane and drying. Did a bit more work on the taillights but still have a long way to go. With the help of my brother we finally got the Bailey Channel in the rear door with the glass in. Now all I have to do if fix it in place then start on the other side.

Cheers

Ian

Hi Ian, sent out your lens, also got around to getting some pictures of aftermarket tail light springs and housing install, its a little involved to do but when complete you have all new springs,

As in pictures, 1 each side 1 at bottom holds lens nice and snug,,, bought the replacement off Countrytraveler" Dave, CA. they are made for different model but I was able to adapt them to fit 34 Dodge,,,,

Alligator clip just to hold in place ran out of small nut/bolts.....

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Hi all,

Steve, thanks for that and let me know what I owe you. The insides of those tail lights look new....as always you do a great job !

I haven't been sitting around....I've actually finished 2 rear door including handles. I must say holding a handle does have a nice feel about it. Both rear door locks are in place as are the windows and winders. I haven't put the striker plates on yet as I'm constantly opening and closing the doors.

Had one slight hiccup. The left side rear wind out window all of a sudden developed a chip in it near the top. Just when I thought I was home and hosed with the wind out windows. Never mind, two steps forward and one step back !

Cheers

Ian

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Hi All,

I shipped all the panels to the body shop now that all the grinding and blasting has been completed. The first job tackled was the banged up area at the rear of the car. The inner panel had to be cut away and repaired and while that was off the banged up area was cut and a new piece made ( well above my pay grade to do this type of work ! ). Ive posted a before and after shot. The was also a hole in the middle of the rear of the car probably used for the rear spare tyre mount and mine had a push in plug. This was removed and steel filled.

Also some of the rust in the rear wheel wells was cut out and repaired. Another interesting thing was the wells for the spare wheels in the front guards. When he lifted the guard up it fell on the ground. We decided to put extra welds on both sides just in case. Imagine driving down the road and the spare tyre in the front guard giving way !

Rust also in the cowl at the front had to be repaired. There were also a few sections in side the car that needed repairing.

I was sort of running a relay at this point where once a panel was repaired I took it to the painter who put a protective coating on it in a two pack primer and then I returned it back to the body shop and it was put into storage until all panels were completed so he could do a temporary trial fitting.

Cheers

Ian

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  • 2 weeks later...
Hi Ian, sent out your lens, also got around to getting some pictures of aftermarket tail light springs and housing install, its a little involved to do but when complete you have all new springs,

As in pictures, 1 each side 1 at bottom holds lens nice and snug,,, bought the replacement off Countrytraveler" Dave, CA. they are made for different model but I was able to adapt them to fit 34 Dodge,,,,

Alligator clip just to hold in place ran out of small nut/bolts.....

3rd photo, completed upgrade to new lens springs, these are from Dave: "countrytraveler" adapted to fit 1934 Dodge, now I just have to find correct lens all 33/34 Plymouth are not correct size must be another 1 year" fit for 34 Dodge, aprox is 3 1/2" if anyone knows let me know who has them,

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Edited by knobless (see edit history)
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Hi Steve,

Nice work..i now have 3 tail lamp internals of which I can make 2 complete ones. That coupled with the two tail lamp bodies I should have 2 good lamps when I'm finished.

....From what I've seen the 34s have a unique tail light lens and neither the 33 or 35s seem to fit.

would it be ok if I sent you some money to pass on to Jack for me ? if ok I'll include the postage for the lens you sent me.

I went to pick up the front door window frames from the electroplated the other day but they still had pitting in them so he's going to redo them but now won't be finished until mid January. Never mind always have something else to work on.

Having the two rear doors finished has really spurred me along again and as I have about a week and a half off I'm going to try and get some more done.

Cheers

Ian

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Hi Steve,

Nice work..i now have 3 tail lamp internals of which I can make 2 complete ones. That coupled with the two tail lamp bodies I should have 2 good lamps when I'm finished.

....From what I've seen the 34s have a unique tail light lens and neither the 33 or 35s seem to fit.

would it be ok if I sent you some money to pass on to Jack for me ? if ok I'll include the postage for the lens you sent me.

I went to pick up the front door window frames from the electroplated the other day but they still had pitting in them so he's going to redo them but now won't be finished until mid January. Never mind always have something else to work on.

Having the two rear doors finished has really spurred me along again and as I have about a week and a half off I'm going to try and get some more done.

Cheers

Ian

Yes thats fine Ian, I know I have his address somewhere or if you have it post it to me,,,, let me know when you send it so I can keep an eye out for it, I too have to touch base with Jack again looking for some other small parts,,,

Steve

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hey all,

A bit more repair work on the rear body bolt holes where rust had eaten away a few small areas.

At this point I brought the chassis over to the body shop and we sat the main body on to get a good idea of the fit. Seemed to fit reasonably well.

Next stage is to get all the panels on for the trial fit. Once done then the main body has to go off and get its two pack undercoat done.

Also received a new accelerator pedal in the post ( my original was very well worn to a point it looked melted ! )

After a long wait my front winged emblem also arrived in the mail which had been completely restored. Done in the traditional Cloisonné method....very happy with that one.

I volunteered to go on a school camp with my daughter to Soverign Hill which is a replica gold mining town and we had to get dressed up in period clothes. We had an absolute blast.

Cheers

Ian

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Dodge Badge.pdf

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Hi David,

A guy names Allan Heywood ( Heywood Enamels ) in Skipton Victoria. Unfortunately he passed away a short time ago. Another excellent tradesman that will be missed. A bit like the guy who did my front windscreen ( Ellis Baron ) all handmade and cannot fault the workmanship.

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Hi Steve.

your dead right. you only get one chance to do things like this and I grab each one.

i guess one reason why I'm restoring my car is that it will outlive me once done and part of me will stay with it.

I suppose I better get on with it.

Ian

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Hi David,

A guy names Allan Heywood ( Heywood Enamels ) in Skipton Victoria. Unfortunately he passed away a short time ago. Another excellent tradesman that will be missed. A bit like the guy who did my front windscreen ( Ellis Baron ) all handmade and cannot fault the workmanship.

Thanks for that Ian. yes it is most unfortunate that many of these master craftsmen are no longer around. I did know about Ellis Baron though. I had a windscreen frame made by him for my fathers 36 Chev roadster many years ago. A superb job.

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Hi Steve.

your dead right. you only get one chance to do things like this and I grab each one.

i guess one reason why I'm restoring my car is that it will outlive me once done and part of me will stay with it.

I suppose I better get on with it.

Ian

I agree with that. Whoever owns it next, hopefully family, will refer to it as Dad's car. As for the outing, you are obviously enjoying it. Did you already own the period dress or did you have to make it?

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Hi Pat,

For school "camps" at Soverign Hill they actually have a full wardrobe area and supply everything. even the pocket watch. I wasn't allowed to wear my normal watch. I also had to interact with the public ( visitors ) and how to all the ladies etc...it was great fun as this is a reproduction full functioning gold mining town. Google Soverign Hill Ballarat and gave a look. While I was there I also gad to make a spoke for a wagon by hand ( needed help with that one ) My daughter had to attend the school there for a few days which nearly killed her because of the strict discipline. ha....I tried it when I got home to no avail !

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  • 4 weeks later...

Back to the Dodge now its cooling off a bit.

Trial fitted the cowl vent, removed the screen and started to put the opening handle in place. Decided to shorten the screws that hold the screen in place.

Did that and made a little pin the hold the opening lever in position. Shortened it and wire brushed the rough edges with the wire brush wheel.

While I was doing that the vibration through the bench vibrated the finished cowl vent along to the edge and you guessed it, it fell onto the concrete. Bugger.

Took it back to the painter and while I was there borrowed next doors sand blaster to clean up my third tail light assembly.

Came up looking good so I made 2 good ones out of the three I have as two of the lens retention clips were broken off ( rusted I guess ).

Cleaned them up and riveted them in place. Gave them a good coat of etch primer and then some black paint.

Happy with the result.

Now the cowl vent has been repainted I can get on with installing it.

Also bought some black radiator overflow tube I'll use for the drain tube for the cowl vent.

Cheers

Ian

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Ok the moment of truth arrived.

A trial fit of the panels to make sure everything looked and sat properly.

All panels were attached to the body and the new running boards did need some minor adjustment but overall everything sat fairly well.

Ah no....not so simple is it !

When the front bonnet sides were attached the gap is uneven between them and the front of the radiator cowl.

One side sits well and the other has an I 1/4" gap. Cannot move the radiator that much to compensate for it.

We put it up on a hoist and found the measurements between certain points on the chassis were out.

Got it down and ran a string line from the centre of the rear window to the centre of the radiator and its out just over an inch.

Somewhere along the line the car has been in an accident and the chassis is bent. Great !

The guy who is doing the body work has a friend with a hydraulic Ram that can bend it back.

So the chassis and engine are sent off and the chassis corrected.

It never occurred to me to check the measurements as I didn't believe the car had been in an accident.

Anyway the guy who bent the chassis back said it was one of the toughest chassis he's bent....so that's good.

Next step once back is to get all the panels back on again and see how we go.

Cheers

Ian

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That's actually a great suggestion. Even though the originals were just a grey metal colour I have some reflective sheeting I could line the inside with which would make the light more efficient. I even had thought of using LED instead of globes but I haven't found anything yet that would be suitable with a brake and park light in one.

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It is amazing how much just a little bit will help brighten those tail lights. Here in the states, Ron Francis and other suppliers have what they call 'bright bulbs' that put out significantly more CP than the originals, even with 6 volts. I originally put tin foil in mine on my 34 PE sedan and then got some of those reflectors that used to be put behind Christmas lights and used them for years. Finally painted the insides with reflective silver paint. Easy to see now. SMB

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In my youth i worked on a few 30's mopars and anytime we measured the chassis it wasn't unusual to find side shorter than the other .But it wasn't from accident damage,it was often a manufacturing fault. 3/4 - 1" was normal .Years later i read in book, (might have been Tex Smiths Mopar hot rod book) that it was indeed quite common to find this. Unless it is actually bent and you can see the wrinkle it is best to alter the panels to fit.

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Hey Ron,

On close examination there did seem to be some sort of repair, very well repaired that even the body guy had to look twice to see it, on the chassis. So we figured that must have been it. All good though as the panel on a quick refit came within the right gaps we'd hoped for.

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I has a brainstorm after reading your posts about reflective insides of the tail light. I was working on my low voltage outdoor lighting and replacing Dichroic Halogen globes with LED and the spotlights have a reflective cone I have to remove to the LED's will fit.

I got this cone and ground the opening with my Dremel tool and it seems to fit well. I may have to shave a bit off the rim when it goes inside the housing but overall looks ok.

Also picked up the front window frames from the electroplater yesterday. I have two roller buffers that seem to align up with the holes in the frame. Can anyone confirm that these attach to the front door window frames ??

Had a little visitor on our deck handrail. The Kookaburra's are looking for food.

Cheers

Ian

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Nice job on the reflectors. I had been thinking about using reflectors out of old bike lights or torches.

Our kotare (kingfisher) is similar to the kookaburra. They sit on top of something - weather station post, windbreak (6 m high), trees by the beach, etc. - and watch for insects, worms, crabs, small fish and so on. They can spot a small worm in the grass from 15 m or so. They must have the most amazing eye sight. The kotare sit very similarly to that kookaburra when watching. To make a nest, the kotare flies flat-tack into a clay bank repeatedly to make a hole about 30-40 mm diameter.

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I has a brainstorm after reading your posts about reflective insides of the tail light. I was working on my low voltage outdoor lighting and replacing Dichroic Halogen globes with LED and the spotlights have a reflective cone I have to remove to the LED's will fit.

I got this cone and ground the opening with my Dremel tool and it seems to fit well. I may have to shave a bit off the rim when it goes inside the housing but overall looks ok.

Also picked up the front window frames from the electroplater yesterday. I have two roller buffers that seem to align up with the holes in the frame. Can anyone confirm that these attach to the front door window frames ??

Had a little visitor on our deck handrail. The Kookaburra's are looking for food.

Cheers

Ian

Looks like those reflectors will work great! Certainly better than my old Christmas lights ones, although those worked pretty well. On the roller, that does not attach to the frames, it attaches to the door itself, outside of the window frame, and serves as a roller against the vertical divider between the vent window and the main window. When I get home tonight I will shoot you a picture of the installation. SMB

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Hi Scott. There is one half way along the front door but I can't remove that. I'll check it out later today.

The outside one seems to be tacked to the door itself the inside one is removable (2 small screws)

I think I posted a picture in these threads with the roller view , I 'll have to check where I posted it.

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ok so there are two rollers. One you can't remove and one you can. the one you can sits up in the air when mounted and covered by the garnish mould or is it mounted inside the opening and all you see is the screw heads and a bit of the roller.

They probably used the vaccum rubber hose in the old days. Great suggestion.

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ok so there are two rollers. One you can't remove and one you can. the one you can sits up in the air when mounted and covered by the garnish mould or is it mounted inside the opening and all you see is the screw heads and a bit of the roller.

They probably used the vaccum rubber hose in the old days. Great suggestion.

Exactly. Roller attaches with sheet metal screws on TOP of the inside door panel, with the roller and shaft hanging down. See attached the one on my 34 PE (with the vacuum hose!).post-89602-143143001472_thumb.jpg

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Not too long ago I acquired a 34 DR 4dr Sedan. I was told at least some of the 33-34 Mopars used wood between the body and frame. Looks like yours had more conventional rubber pads where the body to frame bolts go. Is that correct? Does anyone else know what is correct here, or if coupes or convertibles use wood instead of rubber?

Mine is nearly the same as yours except it has the rear mounted spare instead of side mounts.

Thanks,

Dave

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