DavidAU

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About DavidAU

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 07/18/1944

Profile Information

  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
  • Interests:
    Vintage and Brass cars, High performance classic cars

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  1. I think if it was for a Bentley it would be a bit wider and triple laced.
  2. Contact gilletman on this forum. I think he is in Holland and seems to have a fair knowledge of those cars. You will find his latest post further down the forum titled "Pre War Rally"
  3. I'm with JFranklin above. Clear sheetmetal type Silicone is the best. I spent many years as a metal Roofing contractor and I've seen metal flashings that have been out in the weather (read HEAT) for 20 - 30 years where I live and you have to cut the silicone to separate them. If you stick the badge on with that it will never fall off. I might also add that it is the best thing for sealing exhaust gaskets, manifolds and exhaust pipes as it does not burn. Far better than the expensive exhaust sealer you can buy in tubes.
  4. Just a thought about the curve in the top of the bow. How about slitting a 2mm saw cut in the centre of the bow from one side to the other ( you could even leave a couple of mm of wood on the bottom side so it couldn't be seen from underneath) and insert a straight or curved up piece of 2mm thick steel or stainless ie. 25 x 2 mm across the full width. Through bolt or screw it and cover the ends of the threads so they are hidden and that should hold it straight. Sorry about the size of the sketch
  5. Great job. You wont want to drive it when it's finished in case it gets dinged.
  6. To me, the fact that it is screwed through the face of the badge and that it has the badge makers name on the back says it didn't come off a car as all the car badges I've seen are clipped or use adhesive from the rear. Also GM certainly wouldn't have someone elses name on their stuff. I would think it is probably off a Caravan or boat or similar
  7. This may work https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=1964+Glidden+Tour
  8. I agree with Bush Mechanic. It is called a Wired Edge. If you cut the damaged part of the fender away carefully you may find the original rod or part thereof still in place. If so, you can semi form the patch, weld it in place and heat / beat the new plece around the existing rod.
  9. Sad to hear of car plants closing. All the ones in Australia are gone and everything is imported. I know nothing about the plants in the US ( except they made great cars in the 30's thru to the seveties) but a friend sent this to me the other day which amazed me. Some of you may have seen it
  10. If it has pressed in valves in the factory, one would have to think the manufacturer (not Ford) considered it a disposable item and when the valves failed you throw it away and get another one. All the Ford pumps I have seen have the screws and plate in them.
  11. DavidAU

    Lock cylinder

    Spray some WD40 into the lock and it will help with turning the key and getting it in and out while you get a new key made.
  12. On the tow truck coming home too many years ago and the car restorers/dreamers theme song which I hum as I walk around it. Too many projects but IT WILL HAPPEN. ( If I've got time.)