MarkV

Why The Next Generation Will Be In Our Hobby- Malaise Daze L.A. Show

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

So, last weekend, I attended the Malaise Daze car show. This group and show focused on 1972-1995 vehicles. I of course took my early 87 build Chevy Corsica and literally stood talking to people about it from 8am to 2pm because as people said to me constantly, there used to be a lot of Corsicas and now there are none! There were dozens of cars and hundreds of people at the show which took place at the automotive driving museum. Lots of younger car owners with wagons, Taurus, etc. the main comment is that they liked that they can afford the cars and the upkeep. The Malaise Motors club exists only on facebook, as a result of it taking place at the museum there was fun to be had by viewing the many old vehicles on display from the teens and up. I also bought some really cool vintage car books for a dollar each in the gift shop (books dating back to the 20's). Autoweek was also there and wrote up this article: http://autoweek.com/article/classic-cars/malaize-daze-check-out-best-malaise-era-car-show. I will upload some more cool photos later! 

31434033_10156204324757969_7590536741540081394_n.jpg

31444811_10156204325332969_117499986690905760_n.jpg

31486938_10156204324682969_5225531264850918090_n.jpg

Edited by MarkV (see edit history)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Yes, a show like that sounds like a good idea.

I have a few cars from the velour-lined, comfort-cruising

years of the 1970's and enjoy them very much.

 

If you take your 1947 Packard to a show these days,

the average person might admire it as a piece of history;

but not so many people will exclaim, "I used to have one 

just like that!"  If you take your 1980 Chevrolet Citation,

or your 1985 Ford Country Squire wagon, you're much 

more likely to strike a familiar chord with the public.

The long-time AACA member might not appreciate them yet,

but onlookers may longingly admire a car that brings back

their family memories.

 

Ah, the world of old cars can be much broader than we realize---

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, MarkV said:

So, last weekend, I attended the Malaise Daze car show. This group and show focused on 1972-1995 vehicles. I of course took my early 87 build Chevy Corsica and literally stood talking to people about it from 8am to 2pm

 

 

Hey Mark V, I just joined the Malaise Motors Facebook group recently, apparently shortly after the show.  It is very enthusiastic and probably the busiest group I am in, so I can second your observations.  And you and the Corsica seem to be a star attraction and a favorite of the show, fun to see, Todd C 

 

PS--I started selling Chevys May of 1989 and my dealer had a bunch of 1988 Corsica and Beretta "program" cars, one gray Beretta was my first demo and I was very excited to have a new (to me) car at my disposal.  In good rental car fashion most of these we had were base models in gray or light blue, 4 cylinders, automatic and air and AM/FM with no tape deck (tape decks may have been withheld from rental cars to give retail new cars a selling point).   

Edited by poci1957 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To Mark V, another nugget of my Corsica experience is that we had one slow selling new Corsica that was a gray hatchback with a stick shift that no one wanted. THAT would blow their mind with malaise now, don't you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like a great place to showcase GM's undersized, grabby rear brakes from that period. :lol:

 

I bought a new Eurosport in '88.

It was neither "Euro" nor "Sporty" but at least it wasn't a Ford Aerostar.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, GregLaR said:

but at least it wasn't a Ford Aerostar

 

Recent, forgotten history.

 

Ford had a lot tied up in the Shuttle/Aerostar comparison campaign. It was dropped and launch didn't go as planned.

 

Bernie

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think book time to change the plugs on the Aerostar was between 3 and 4 hours. 

One of the most offensive vehicles known to man.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎5‎/‎2‎/‎2018 at 7:18 PM, MarkV said:

So, last weekend, I attended the Malaise Daze car show. This group and show focused on 1972-1995 vehicles.

 

 

 

To me, malaise era cars are from 1973 through 1981.  I felt the malaise era was finally ending when the Mustang finally broke out of the 'malaise mold' in 1982 with the mid-year GT, Chrysler with their LeBaron and Dodge 400 convertibles, and GM introducing a convertible Riviera that year as well.  1995 is far too late, and1972 still had some good looking cars without those ghastly 5-mph bumpers.  

 

Craig 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/3/2018 at 3:38 PM, GregLaR said:

I think book time to change the plugs on the Aerostar was between 3 and 4 hours. 

One of the most offensive vehicles known to man.

   

    I had a friend with a car philosophy that he would buy a new car and keep it 10 years to get his           moneys worth maximized.   His new Aerostar didn't last 10 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to keep cars for decades. Have never had a Ford or a Pickup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, padgett said:

I tend to keep cars for decades. Have never had a Ford or a Pickup.

 

 

I don't know how a guy could get thru life without a good pick up.

I have a pick up that is a Ford.

I remember when I bought it in 95 that it might just be the last one I need.

$31,000 was a big hit for me.

Don't drive it all that much as it only has 140K in it. And its always been garaged since new.

 I love the thing and will probably not need replacing.

 

The canopy is the best part. LOL

I put that on there when I drag the family to Seattle for Christmas every year.

Only a couple more years and it will be an antique, Or would that be classic?

Either way, the kids follow me home wanting to buy it already.

 

Being a '95 I suspect it would be a hit at this show.

20141216_131152.jpg

20141216_131330.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎6‎/‎1‎/‎2018 at 7:32 AM, 8E45E said:

To me, malaise era cars are from 1973 through 1981.  I felt the malaise era was finally ending when the Mustang finally broke out of the 'malaise mold' in 1982 with the mid-year GT, Chrysler with their LeBaron and Dodge 400 convertibles, and GM introducing a convertible Riviera that year as well.  1995 is far too late, and1972 still had some good looking cars without those ghastly 5-mph bumpers.  

 

Craig 

 

I have always objected to the term "Malaise era" for 1970's cars. You still get actual size differences, style, tons of colors, different body styles, and most cars wore the 5 mph bumpers well enough unless it was something like a Maverick. I know I personally prefer the 5 mph bumpers on my '76 Mark IV. The skinny ones on the '72 just look too small and inadequate to me. The only negatives were emissions killing the horsepower, and the ridiculously boxy downsizing of the '77-'79 full size and '78-79 mid size GM's.

 

The real Malaise era is 1985 to 2000 when GM really killed its full size models in terms of size and style, 2 doors and station wagons started going away to be replaced by SUV's, "full size" Cadillac DeVilles were the same size as a 1970's compact and were not much different looks and size wise from a Chevy Celebrity, and your color choices were reduced to shades of gray. I remember this commercial, and my friends and I all thought it was awesome.

 

 

 

Edited by LINC400 (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎6‎/‎3‎/‎2018 at 5:26 AM, LINC400 said:

The only negatives were emissions killing the horsepower, and the ridiculously boxy downsizing of the '77-'79 full size and '78-79 mid size GM's.

 

The real Malaise era is 1985 to 2000 when GM really killed its full size models in terms of size and style, 2 doors and station wagons started going away to be replaced by SUV's, "full size" Cadillac DeVilles were the same size as a 1970's compact and were not much different looks and size wise from a Chevy Celebrity, and your color choices were reduced to shades of gray. I remember this commercial, and my friends and I all thought it was awesome.

 

 

 

The malaise era did perpetuate with GM beyond 1982, as their engineering and build quality was hopelessly mired in the 1970's.  The start of GM's downfall were the 1977 & later 'full'-size line which had even less to differentiate them between the five brands than previous, coupled with engine-swapping from lesser brands. (The famous lawsuit of an Olds engine in a Cadillac comes to mind.)  Roger Smith brought even MORE malaise upon the Corporation as the 80's dragged on for GM.

 

Cadillac's downfall started even earlier as no Cadillac built later than 1966 has ever come close to matching a 1966 Fleetwood for interior opulence, and (for the time), build quality as I stated in Post #50 here: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?28512-Pontiac-shuts-down(without-comment)/page2

 

A beautifully preserved example:

https://www.leftcoastclassics.com/1966-cadillac-fleetwood/

 

Had Cadillac kept up with its build quality as Rolls Royce, Bentley, and the three German marques did, and even Volkswagen with its Phaeton model, Cadillac could still have been a serious  competitor to this day in the 'ultra-luxury' market as they were in the 1930's.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, 8E45E said:

The malaise era did perpetuate with GM beyond 1982, as their engineering and build quality was hopelessly mired in the 1970's.  The start of GM's downfall were the 1977 & later 'full'-size line which had even less to differentiate them between the five brands than previous, coupled with engine-swapping from lesser brands. (The famous lawsuit of an Olds engine in a Cadillac comes to mind.)  Roger Smith brought even MORE malaise upon the Corporation as the 80's dragged on for GM.

 

Cadillac's downfall started even earlier as no Cadillac built later than 1966 has ever come close to matching a 1966 Fleetwood for interior opulence, and (for the time), build quality

 

Had Cadillac kept up with its build quality as Rolls Royce, Bentley, and the three German marques did, and even Volkswagen with its Phaeton model, Cadillac could still have been a serious  competitor to this day in the 'ultra-luxury' market as they were in the 1930's.

 

Craig

 

 

It was Chevrolet engines in Oldsmobiles.

 

The 1966 Fleetwood interior is just a personal preference. To be honest, I was expecting to see something more impressive for the 1966 Fleetwood interior. Lincolns and Imperials had much the same wood and leather in the 1960's and changed to plastic in the 1970's and 1980's. A 1976 Cadillac Fleetwood Talisman has a far more visually impressive interior even if the wood is plastic. And since the Fleetwood made up less than 7% of Cadillac's sales even in 1966, apparently not many Cadillac buyers were impressed enough to pay extra for it.

 

Cadillac's downfall was not the loss of the 1966 Fleetwood interior, but the grandpa image it obtained in the 1980's and '90's. Cadillac engines used to be used in hot rods and performance cars in the '50's and '60's. But the dinky '80's and '90's FWD offerings eventually failed to even impress grandpas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My two sons, 19 and 21, are involved with an internet based club known as Old School. It does have a website. Attached are a few pics. In general the club caters for whatever the members can afford.

 

The Toyota Crown wagon I have owned since 1991 so the boys have grown up with it. It is currently having a new engine built, changing from sohc 2 valves/cylinder to dohc 4 valves/cylinder.  The Crown coupe I bought in 2000 but the boys have resurrected, and repowered it (from 2.8 litre 5M-E to 3.0 litre 7M-GE). The 1929 Plymouth is also ours and was out on an occasion when my son would normally have been driving the Crown coupe.

 

In recent times two local people with large collections of cars and parts have passed away and the opportunity has arisen for the boys to acquire cars and spares at a very reasonable price.  The crashed circa 1973 Toyota Crown MS75 coupe has yielded a lot of shiny parts for someone else's restoration along with a manual gearbox and associated parts for my son.

29351934_1623756247709859_1734298703770243991_o.jpg

29662902_1623756164376534_3622894231682660352_o.jpg

14902715_1163330703743088_3545048195117802089_o.jpg

27992942_1618598194883001_4506292276205246129_o.jpg

26840627_1550202175087333_2669365761268902458_o.jpg

IMG_8682 (1024x768).jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, LINC400 said:

 

 

It was Chevrolet engines in Oldsmobiles.

 

Lincolns and Imperials had much the same wood and leather in the 1960's and changed to plastic in the 1970's and 1980's. A 1976 Cadillac Fleetwood Talisman has a far more visually impressive interior even if the wood is plastic. And since the Fleetwood made up less than 7% of Cadillac's sales even in 1966, apparently not many Cadillac buyers were impressed enough to pay extra for it.

 

And Oldsmobile engines in Cadillacs.

 

That '70's Talisman interior sums up just how miserable the decade was, where it was all smoke and mirrors, compromising the real product with imitation wood, and vinyl to look like the real deal.  Of course, Lincoln and Imperial were also at fault in downgrading materials as well.  

 

In GM's corporate portfolio, the other four divisions are supposed to be the volume leaders, and Cadillac the division which maintains exclusivity. 

 

Craig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

My two sons, 19 and 21, are involved with an internet based club known as Old School. It does have a website. Attached are a few pics. In general the club caters for whatever the members can afford.

 

Thankfully, Australia and New Zealand were spared of the 70's malaise North America experienced.

 

If I was in the market for a mid-to-late 70's American-looking car, 'down undda' is where I'll go look for one.  The (once) Big Three had some nice offerings there in those years which were spared of the downright ugly 5-mph bumpers and still had great performance over the anti-emission-choked engines here in North America.  At a car show about a year ago, I came across someone hoping I would "drool" over his nicely presented 1978 Mustang II King Cobra.  I told him, while it was nice and clean, Cobras from those years never did a thing for me, (nor did any other Pinto-based Mustang II), and if I want a Cobra from that year, I'll go to Australia and bring back a Falcon XC Cobra.  In 'retaliation', he told me to add an extra '0' to the asking price, and I came back with the adage that you'll 'get what you pay for', and in the case of an XC Cobra, you'll get it back if you decide to sell.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, 8E45E said:

And Oldsmobile engines in Cadillacs.

 

That '70's Talisman interior sums up just how miserable the decade was, where it was all smoke and mirrors, compromising the real product with imitation wood, and vinyl to look like the real deal.  Of course, Lincoln and Imperial were also at fault in downgrading materials as well.  

 

In GM's corporate portfolio, the other four divisions are supposed to be the volume leaders, and Cadillac the division which maintains exclusivity. 

 

Craig

 

While Oldsmobile engines were used in Cadillacs, I can find no reference for lawsuits on that. The lawsuits were for Chevrolet engines in Oldsmobiles.

 

Your preference for a 1966 Fleetwood is a personal opinion. I have never heard anyone else refer to it as the best Cadillac interior.

 

5 mph bumpers are also a personal opinion. 1976 Cadillacs are the most popular collectible Cadillacs of the 1970's, and they all have them.

 

Car companies are in business to make money. Most companies that chose exclusivity over volume are out of business. Even Mercedes sells taxis and police cars in Europe. Rolls Royce has had to be bailed out multiple times.

 

I am not surprised the owner of a Mustang II Cobra felt the need to "retaliate". Sounds like he was very proud of his car, and was not thrilled with being told how Australian Cobras are better than his Pinto based Mustang

Edited by LINC400 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, LINC400 said:

 

While Oldsmobile engines were used in Cadillacs, I can find no reference for lawsuits on that. The lawsuits were for Chevrolet engines in Oldsmobiles.

 

Your preference for a 1966 Fleetwood is a personal opinion. I have never heard anyone else refer to it as the best Cadillac interior.

 

5 mph bumpers are also a personal opinion. 1976 Cadillacs are the most popular collectible Cadillacs of the 1970's, and they all have them.

 

Car companies are in business to make money. Most companies that chose exclusivity over volume are out of business. Even Mercedes sells taxis and police cars in Europe. Rolls Royce has had to be bailed out multiple times.

 

I am not surprised the owner of a Mustang II Cobra felt the need to "retaliate". Sounds like he was very proud of his car, and was not thrilled with being told how Australian Cobras are better than his Pinto based Mustang

While I do like the 'cabin ambience' of the '66 Fleetwood interior, other postwar Cadillacs had nice interiors, including the 1957-8 Eldorado Brougham, and the 2005 XLR.

 

You can keep those ugly 5-mph bumpers and all the ill-fitting flexible painted urethane filler pieces between the bumper and the body that never fit right in the first place.  One advantage you have, is prices for malaise era Cadillacs are in the toilet, and will probably remain so for some time.  Here's one for well under $10K.  https://classiccars.com/listings/view/1087898/1976-cadillac-fleetwood-for-sale-in-alsip-illinois-60803

 

Mercedes Benz has always made money, and they've kept their prestige up with the S-class cars and the even more exclusive Maybach.  Honda, Toyota, and Nissan must have thought there was money to be made in higher quality, higher priced cars with lower volume or they wouldn't have entered the market with the Acura, Lexus, and Infiniti.  Cadillac and Lincoln were both caught off-guard with that assault on their home turf market and are still paying for it.  And now Hyundai has made Genesis a marque in its own right, also hoping to capitalize on the fat profit margins the cars in this market have.

 

In the case of the Mustang II King Cobra owner, he DID admit the Australian Falcon XC Cobra was better than his Pinto-based Mustang II, but retaliated by saying that he didn't have $100K AUD to buy one.   It wasn't a case of him not being thrilled about my preference of the Australian Cobra over the U.S. Cobra, but he was even more thrilled that I was aware of the Falcon XC Cobra.

 

Craig 

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, LINC400 said:

 

While Oldsmobile engines were used in Cadillacs, I can find no reference for lawsuits on that. The lawsuits were for Chevrolet engines in Oldsmobiles.

 

 

*

*

Tell me more about the lawsuit! Was it a mistake when they put on Olds engine in my 86 Chevy wagon??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That first lawsuit started in 1977:  https://www.nytimes.com/1977/03/15/archives/article-4-no-title-engine-swaps-innocent-to-gm-but-sinful-to.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1981/06/28/us/jury-orders-gm-to-pay-10000-in-switch-of-engines.html

 

Starting with the 1978 model year, GM started making the disclaimers in all their advertising, stating the various divisions do 'engine swaps', and will continue to do so.  To me, it was rather invalid as Canadian Pontiacs used Chevrolet engines since the 1930's!!

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎6‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 7:17 AM, 8E45E said:

You can keep those ugly 5-mph bumpers and all the ill-fitting flexible painted urethane filler pieces between the bumper and the body that never fit right in the first place.  One advantage you have, is prices for malaise era Cadillacs are in the toilet, and will probably remain so for some time.  Here's one for well under $10K.  https://classiccars.com/listings/view/1087898/1976-cadillac-fleetwood-for-sale-in-alsip-illinois-60803

 

Mercedes Benz has always made money, and they've kept their prestige up with the S-class cars and the even more exclusive Maybach.  Honda, Toyota, and Nissan must have thought there was money to be made in higher quality, higher priced cars with lower volume or they wouldn't have entered the market with the Acura, Lexus, and Infiniti.  Cadillac and Lincoln were both caught off-guard with that assault on their home turf market and are still paying for it.  And now Hyundai has made Genesis a marque in its own right, also hoping to capitalize on the fat profit margins the cars in this market have.

 

 

As I said, the 5ph bumpers are a personal preference. I always thought the late '60's - early '70's cars with a body color painted metal panel below the bumper looked ridiculous. Why should the body of the car extend below the bumper and rocker panels? It was even better after a few years when those panels were loose and precariously hanging or swinging.

 

50f0a48f2a1ed9d448055081e2ea6938.jpg

 

Japanese manufacturers capitalized on the ridiculous mindset of the general public that all American cars are no good, and all foreign cars are wonderful. Plus the American carmakers refused to update the larger luxury cars with features that could be found in midsize foreign sedans. However, they really don't offer anything more exclusive than the domestics. Even the Maybach looks like a 2 tone S Class at first glance despite costing 2-3 times as much. And I don't think they are doing too well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Long time ACORNs may remember Ray Bishop. At one point I think he had 35 Corvairs on his farm. That was his specialty from around 1970. He was a good friend from the time I was 14 and he gave me a '56 Golden Hawk when I was in High School.

 

He passed away in the early 1990's. Shortly before he died I was sitting with him at a local cruise night. He was driving a 1972 Thunderbird he had just purchased. He told me "You know, I really like that T-Bird. Specializing in just Corvairs for all those years caused me to miss out on a lot of nice cars." I was listening.

 

Later I became more deeply involved in computers and had a friend who was one of those "hate Microsoft" people. He denied their existence and refused to look at any of their products. I still met with him on various other projects until he became too extreme. I did come to the realization that his rejection of the things he didn't like boiled down to real arrogance. I guess that is what I often see in these people with their exclusive tastes in what should be a "correct" car. The exclusive part is usually excluding someone with a car they don't care for.

 

" You can talk, you can talk, you can bicker,
You can talk. You can bicker, bicker, bicker, you can talk
You can talk. You can talk, talk, talk, talk, bicker, bicker, bicker.
You can talk all you wanna, but your body language is gonna give you away."

 

I was listening that day, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now