Mark Kikta

1922 engine progress

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Apparently the air valve opens and closes too fast and the spring is too springy, so it needs a dash pot. Weird.

 

Now to figure out what this means for my car with no dash pot. Worse gas mileage? 

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The throttle body with the 10-47 was used on both the 1922 4 cylinder and 1922 6 cylinder carburetors. It is not unique to either. To determine exactly which carb you have, you need to check other components.

 

Marvel did an excellent job of providing service literature. They printed a 28 page booklet for 1922 that would have come with the car.

 

Jon.

Edited by carbking (see edit history)
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Jon,

 

the carb kit I purchased did not have a gasket for the dash pot bowl.  Do you know where I can find one?

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Jon,

You are right about the 28 page piece from Marvel.  I have one of those brochures since I have a 1922 6-Cylinder Buick also.  I have made copies of it and it is on its way to Mark as I write this.  A lot of information contained in those pages.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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1 hour ago, Mark Kikta said:

When I took it apart there was a red cardboard type gasket in the carb body?

 

Sorry, it looked like pipe thread from here. Never mind.

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11 hours ago, Mark Kikta said:

Jon,

 

the carb kit I purchased did not have a gasket for the dash pot bowl.  Do you know where I can find one?

No gasket necessary, and Marvel did not use one.

 

Jon.

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Terry beat me to sending the same copies. Of course I originally got them from him. In reading the same booklet as has been my experience with all these early to late 20s Marvels including my 1925s. The text in these booklets tells much more on how the heat system is set up and operates. Minimal information about the setup and servicing the actual carburetor. As we all have agreed that in this day and age with modern fuels we usually disable and plug the heat pipes. To have all the linkages, dampers, dashpot valves and all set up to work according to the booklet would have been a servicing nightmare.

 The booklet for my 1925s was so small I had to enlarge it 200% to be readable. People must have had better eyesight back then. No device screens to stare at all day!

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In the process of getting the manifolds ready to install, I took the flapper out of the Heat Control valve and I had the ends of the two tubes going to the carburetor welded closed.

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After one more day of soaking in a can of carburetor cleaner, the air valve was freed up and moves very easily now.  Used the small spray stick on a spray can of brake cleaner to pressure wash the shaft of the air valve to finish freeing up it's movement.  After another good hot soak and ultrasonic cleaning and I think I am good to go.  Used air pressure to check high speed jet and it seems like it's very clean.

Venturi and air valve final cleaning in ulttrasonic cleaner.jpg

Venturi and air valve mechanism just out of ultrasonic cleaner.jpg

Edited by Mark Kikta (see edit history)

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8 hours ago, dibarlaw said:

 The booklet for my 1925s was so small I had to enlarge it 200% to be readable. People must have had better eyesight back then. No device screens to stare at all day!

Larry, 

   I wanted to share these photos of the bibles that my Dad carried in the war.  In particular the size of the text of the bible with the quarter over it.  Talk about small print.  If you asked him he would probably tell you that the bible stopped a bullet from hitting him in the chest, but that is a story for another day.     Hugh

IMG_4792.thumb.JPG.4df76beb6c3756bb0c6f72f432dfeab7.JPGIMG_4797.thumb.JPG.7f574664fb2839ecc4ec5929d63497ea.JPG

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Earlier on there was the discussion on the tapered pin  / rolled pin  thru the water pump shaft...

On a recently acquired 1922 engine/gearbox you will note below the double bent nail I'll be keeping that as a

spare... :)

 

 

nailedit.PNG

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16 hours ago, AussieBuick said:

Earlier on there was the discussion on the tapered pin  / rolled pin  thru the water pump shaft...

On a recently acquired 1922 engine/gearbox you will note below the double bent nail I'll be keeping that as a

spare... :)

 

 

 

 

You gotta give the guy credit. He had enough smarts to know to use that. Not the carpenters square cut nails of the time, which would have snapped if he tried to bend it. My experience restoring old houses, I come across the old-fashioned square cut nails all the time in houses from the 1800's and early 1900s, and they don't bend at all, even slightly....they break....very brittle.

square.jpg

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AussieBuick,

 

I think that picture is a 1923 because the end plate is on and oriented like a 23 and the distributor doesn't have a grease fitting on the 1922, at least on the US made Buicks.

 

R,

Mark

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6 hours ago, Mark Kikta said:

AussieBuick,

 

I think that picture is a 1923 because the end plate is on and oriented like a 23 and the distributor doesn't have a grease fitting on the 1922, at least on the US made Buicks.

 

R,

Mark

 

Hi Mark,

 

Its attached to a four cylinder engine # 847957, carburettor  model 10-47...

 

I would like it to be 23 but alas no... still plenty of parts I can use.

 

It was stored in a shed less than 10 minutes from home for the last 20 years..

 

Regards

 

Norm

 

 

 

 

 

10-47 carbie.PNG

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Tonight I got my wife to lend me another set of hands so we could bolt my exhaust and intake manifolds on.  I first torqued the bolts to 18 ft lbs but I felt like that wasn’t enough so I raised it to 25 ft lbs.  seems like that should work and all the copper ring crush seals look like they are crushed evenly along the manifolds.  I painted the exhaust manifold with Zybar high temp coating from Summit racing.

F38B9F7A-1E4D-4D4F-B1AE-CAC0FA78B288.jpeg

399DF264-C5C3-4A67-91FF-822C76D25F94.jpeg

Edited by Mark Kikta (see edit history)
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