Mark Kikta

1922 engine progress

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Larry,

 

Thanks again for making this all happen for me.  Not sure how I would have made this happen otherwise.  I look forward to seeing you at the next event.  Good luck getting your car back on the road after the tour.

 

Mark

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Mark,

 

I have already had the radiator out and cleaned out.  The shop said that did the work and said it was full of "gunk".  One item down, two more to go.  Making good progress so far.  Hope to have it running again by the end of the week.

 

Larry

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10 minutes ago, Mark Kikta said:

Sounds great!   Maybe a filter is in order?

 

I need to relocate the sediment bowl and reroute the fuel line.

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Finally got my new lathe and Teflon rod so I made my wrist pin buttons today.  I think they came out great. I used 1in Teflon rod to turn down. Now I can finally begin assembly of my engine.

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Despite the temperature in my garage of 100 degrees, I finally managed to get my pistons installed into the block and the cylinder block installed onto the crankcase. 

I laid the cylinder block on it's side so it was easier to install the pistons before moving it to the crankcase. I taped cardboard on the crank journals so  I had no chance of scratching a journal while putting these parts together.

 

I first soaked each piston in motor oil so I could lubricate the wrist pin well.  Then I installed my new wrist pin buttons prior to using a ring compressor to install the pistons.  I held the piston in place and my wife tapped the piston in using a small piece of wood.  After we installed each piston, we tied them in place so that we had no danger of the pistons slipping out as we lifted the cylinder block to the crankcase.

 

As my wife slowly lowered the block in place, I guided the connecting rods to their places on the crankshaft.  After bolting the block in place, I crawled underneath the motor to take the carboard off the journals and set the rods firmly in place on the journals.  I'll come back on a cooler day the use plastic gage to check bearing clearances before final installation of the pistons and rods.

 

For me it was exciting to finally make some progress towards getting my engine back together.

Gasket on crankcase before block installed.jpg

Installing pistons into cylinder block.jpg

Pisons installed in cylinder block prior to lifting.jpg

Moving bolck before installation onto crankcase.jpg

Cylinder block being lowered to crankcase.jpg

Block bolted onto crankcase with pistons installed.jpg

Edited by Mark Kikta (see edit history)
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Mark,

Great progress indeed!   I have a question or two for you.  Since you have the starter/generator unit and the water pump assembly going back on, it looks like in the photos that you sealed up the timing gear cover permanent?  Please correct me if I am wrong on this, but won't you have to remove that cover to install the water pump shaft?  When the guys at Davenport go through my engine I am going to have them not put the fan pulley on the camshaft so that that will only be done once when I button everything up for the final time.  I spoke with Larry Schramm and he told me that your water pump and shaft came out just great.  And I am sure that you are well aware that Brian Heil is our resident ignition timing expert.  I sure am envious of you at this point with your engine assembly progress.  Keep up the good work and keep those photos coming.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry,

I did not have to re-open the timing gear cover to take the water pump shaft off and since have yet to drill the hole for the pin at the S/G end, I don’t think I need to access the timing gears.  Am I missing something?

 

Thank you for the kind words 

 

Mark

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Terry:

 As I have told Hugh and others that the water pump is a serviceable assembly. Hence the adjustment at the distributer head for re timing. It may be good for your own peace of mind to have the front cover removed to get the marks on the crank gear, timing gear and pump shaft gear all in alignment. If all the assembly was done at the same time.

 After I had my engine rebuilt I had to pull the water pump, shaft and gear assembly off 3 times before I was done. I would not relish having to jack the engine up, use a puller to remove the front pulley and remove the cover just to install the water pump shaft and gear.

 Also Mark, do not forget that the spacing of the Oldham coupler plate. I believe it should be about .050. Then locate and drill your end coupler taper pin hole. The Starter /Generator will not motor if the spacing is too tight.

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The only timing marks that need to be aligned are the cam to crankshaft. The water pump shaft doesn’t matter as the ignition timing is set with the distributer.

 

Looking good and great progress...

 

Jim

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5 hours ago, Jim Bourque said:

The only timing marks that need to be aligned are the cam to crankshaft. The water pump shaft doesn’t matter as the ignition timing is set with the distributer.

 

 

Yeah, whatever position the water pump shaft is in relative to the generator, it doesn't matter, you can always just loosen the screw in the middle of the distributor and adjust the distributor cam to the position it needs to be for the timing.

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Tonight it was much cooler so I finished checking clearances and torquing rod cap bolts.  All checked .0015 or .002 thousands.  I think the are good to go

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Mark

Have you had a look at the gear that drives the oil pump that is driven by the camshaft? Typically it’s brass and it may be worn....

Very easy to get at with where you are at in your process.

I do like to promote mission creep 😜

Jim

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Actually I did look hard at that gear and it looks like new.  I’ll either put some grease on or squirt oil all over that gear.

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Today I installed the oil pump and in the process of checking the cleanliness of the oil delivery tubes, I noticed a fairly significant leak at one of the tubing joints.  I’ll need to get that repaired before installing the tubes.

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Yes Mark I had to do the same on my 25 Standard. When I first pulled my pan I saw that someone had smeared Blue RTV sealer over the joint!!!!

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I clamped the tube assembly to a planed true board to keep thing in alignment. Also use a trammel to locate the mounting holes accurately.

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