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DonMicheletti

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About DonMicheletti

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    Menlo Park, CA

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  1. Zero movement is strange. Especially both valves. I have had engines with flattened cam lobes, but there was still some movement of the valves. You might drop the pan and have a look at the cam first and see how those last lobes look
  2. About 35years ago, when I restored our '38 Buick Roadmaster, I visited a friend whe was a real Packard fan. He had several from 1902 to about 1936 or so. His latest was a Twin Six (v12). I had driven that Packard many times and it was a great car. He asked me if the Buick performed as well as his Twin Six. I told him the Buick was a better performer. He didnt believe me. I handed him the keys and said "find out for youself". He drove off with the Buick. He came back abour 20 minurtes later and handed me the keys and said "That SOB is a race car". I do admit that the Packa
  3. Take the cap off the front of the S/G and check the carbon generator brush and attached wire. Check continuity to the terminal at the back. If it worked on the bench, it should work in the car. Also,will the starter crank the engine? Is the ampmeter OK?
  4. The fact that it flods when cranked is strange. It is just a gravity fed system. Any other symptoms?
  5. The rod that controls the generator brushes might be set wrong and is holding the generatot brush off its commutator
  6. In my opinion, replacing the rear engine seal, with the engine in the car, is the most difficult job to do on an automobile. Buicks are even worse. A super PITA job, if you can even do it. My advise is to leave that alone unless the engine is out of the car. Also, it is possible to get the trans so it doesnt leak - I have done it.
  7. I modified one of those switches using a choke cable to the dash. Not too hard to do and I love it. Just a bit of bracketry. The switch is mounted at the starter
  8. On my '38 Roadmaster, the mains are inserts and are shimmed. Rods poured with shims
  9. Having recently worked on a '41 Super, I was surprised to find that theyhad eliminated that very convenient cover - solid floor
  10. The Century transmission is much bigger and heavier.
  11. I use a rifle bore brush dipped in solvent and an electric drill to clean the oil from bolt holes before sealing. No... I havn't set anything on fire.
  12. When I was restoring my spare S/G I had the same problem. Since I had the corrext tap, I made my own
  13. OldTech, I cant count the number of times I have checked a charging system like that and I have never had a problem. Howevcer, It is important to know that if the generator output is controlled by varying the grounding of the field.
  14. To ground the field, all you need to do is use a screwdriver to ground the generator terminal to the generator case.
  15. Terry, That is a neat hootnanny. But, I think with modern fuels it has "vaporlock" writtn all over it. On my E-45 I used to have fuel problems like vapor lock. There is a tube from the exhaust manifold to the choke mechanism. I felt it might be transfering too much heat to the carb, so I rempved it (it lives under the seat now). The car ran much better that way and has been that way for many years. Any one else do this?"
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