Mark Kikta

1922 engine progress

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There is a little bit of surface rust in this tank but I think it looks very good for its age.

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Don't ever, ever, ever, paint or coat the inside of a gas tank with anything. Anything, whatsoever. Whatever you coat it with, will sooner or later flake off and get into the gas and clog the filter screen. Plenty of people will sell you coatings for inside the tank, which may work for 5 or 10 years, but what about the guy 50 years from now, who buys the car and finds the inside of the tank was coated with all that now-deteriorating mystery coating that is falling apart into the tank? Gas tanks are made of steel, and clean steel it will be.  Fill the tank with water and generous amounts of Dawn detergent, to dissolve all the crap, shake it around like crazy, and rinse with water and let it dry, or rinse with water and a final rinse with denatured alcohol, to shorten the drying time. Now you have a gas tank.

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Gas Tank ReNu

 

Coated my tank over 30 years ago and I have a filler you can stick your fist thru so I can see whats in there.  Looks like it did 30 years ago.

 

Dawn detergent won't seal a leak.

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If a tank is leaky from rust, it's dead. Gas Tank ReNu requires that you media blast down to the bare metal, inside and outside, because it doesn't stick to rust. If the tank leaks because of rust, media blasting will knock off more rust and make it leak much worse. I have no idea what ReNu is, whether it's paint or an epoxy or whatever, but if the gas tank is rusted to the point that it leaks, you need a new gas tank.

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Your tank looks pretty incredible Mark. Wish I took pictures of my ‘18 before I relined it with a POR-15 tank sealer product - it was incredibly ugly for having simply set dry for only 10 years.

 

Re. Gas Tank ReNu - I’m with Brian.

I’ve said it elsewhere, but I just can’t imagine any reason any tank can’t be sealed up and saved. I owned a 1952 Studebaker for 30+ years. In 1985 (I think) a local radiator shop reclined it with Gas Tank ReNu. It had rust holes so big walnuts could have fallen out of them - in fact there may have been walnuts in it (we’ve got squirrels in MI like Kansas has mice).

I remember it being costly to have done professionally then, like $250.00 - which was a lot when I was making 60.00 per week. Best money I ever spent.

I don’t know what the stuff is. The Studebaker’s tank was lined inside and out, and I just didn’t want the unsightly mess on the ‘18. I may regret not trying it just on the inside — because the stuff WORKS. Never had a problem with it, not even after the introduction of Ethanol which has only increased over the years. 

When I finally gave that Studebaker to someone I thought might appreciate it, it had sat for a few years (yes, with bad gas in it). After a few days he called me, “Where can I get a new tank?” I said, “Bob you do not need a new tank. The one you have was relined by Corbin Radiator. Just take it off and wash it out.” He called back, “No, it’s pretty ugly I want a new tank.” I said, “Good luck with that. Looked for one 30 years ago and they ALL had holes the size of walnuts.”

He washed the tank. Still good today. He did not take my advice and put only non-ethanol ‘rec gas’ in it which is available in MI at $4.00+ gallon.

The stuff works.

https://www.gastankrenu.com/how-it-works/

 

Ben P.

 

 

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I just got the gasoline tank for the 1916 back from the folks out in Ohio who did the ReNu process on it.  For those who do not know what this is this is where they media blast the inside of the tank and it is coated with a ceramic material then baked in an oven to cure it.  I had this done several years ago for the 1920 and it has worked perfectly ever since.  I'm with Brian about this process.  It works and is definitely cheaper than going to the cost of having a new tank made.  I will post some photos of the tank before it goes under paint.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out Doo Dah Way

 

 

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Hi Mark,

Whatever you decide to do, I would recommend using electrolysis to remove all the rust on the inside of the tank.

Rust removal by electrolysis is all over YouTube.

 

This is one with a nice explanation for doing a gas tank.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Cleaning+Rusty+Gas+Tank+Electrolysis&&view=detail&mid=066A7465A7B1194FA18F066A7465A7B1194FA18F&rvsmid=C50249BBAC70824F8111C50249BBAC70824F8111&FORM=VDRVRV

 

Dwight 

 

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Gas Tank ReNu gives a lifetime guarantee also. 

 

I have used them 4 times. All with perfect results. 

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Speaking of tank leaks. 

 

I was on a tour years ago and a guy had a leak.  He wrapped Teflon tape on a sheet metal screw and ran it in.  Finished the tour just fine.  

 

He pulled the tank and had ReNu seal it that winter. 

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I finally figured out how to get the rocker arm shafts out to inspect them and clean them up.  The oil wick inside them seemed to be OK. I poured oil into the shafts and the wicks absorbed the oil just fine.  After cleaning everything well I reinstalled them onto the engine and filled them with oil.

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Today I finally finished making my own version of an oil pan drain plug.  I was frustrated because I could not stop the original drain from leaking.  These things will likely leak plenty other places but I am not giving in on the oil pan drain.  So I made this contraption on my new mini lathe and it has not leaked a drop in a half a day.  I hope it works.   Here are a few pictures of my design.  The first picture shows the drain with the rotating plug removed. Then I put my pieces together with gaskets top and bottom and a copper gasket on the bolt on the bottom.  So far so good.

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I called Shell Oil Co. and talked to the technical Dept. .  They told me that hypoid gear oil will eat into your bronze bushings.  

 

Look up Penrite Oil.  Or, from the auto parts store, get the 90 - 185 gear oil.

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In an effort to keep this thread current and complete, I am just re-posting some pictures that I already posted in another thread. At least they will all be here for future reference.

 

  Next step for me involved taking the rocker arm shafts apart to clean and oil before re-installing them. The wick material inside the shafts seemed to work fine as it still absorbed oil as I squirted it into the shafts. The shafts twisted out of the holders and cleaned up nicely. All rockers seemed to be free but not worn much.  I was glad for that.  So all rocker arms and shafts are installed.

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Edited by Mark Kikta (see edit history)

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So next I installed lifters, push rods and holders. Before bolting the starter back on, I cleaned the sliding gears and overrun clutch as good as I could.  I tried to knock the shaft out so I could take the gears apart to clean, but I could not get the shaft out.  I was afraid to keep beating on it since I didn't want to brake anything, so I used several cans of brake clean and then lubricated the shaft and clutch with a light oil.  Everything seems to operate as it is supposed to,  so I am moving on.

sliding gears for starter.jpg

sliding gears 2.jpg

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My newly re-manufactured water pump shaft fit perfectly, thanks to Larry Schramm and his work making it for me.  I needed to drill the hole in the proper location to pin/bolt the oldham coupling properly so the starter would function properly.  I taped a shim to the coupling spacer of sheet metal .045 in thickness to ensure I did not get the coupling mounted with too tight of clearance to the starter.  I slid the coupling in place and punched a mark in the shaft so I could then remove it and use my drill press to drill properly.  I ordered a 1/4 shoulder screw from McMaster-Carr and I decided to bolt the coupling to the shaft so I can then remove and replace easier as required in the future.  I drilled a pilot hole in the shaft and then plan to fit the bolt after I get it.   

 

Also fitted the shaft at the timing gear end and it fit great.

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Edited by Mark Kikta (see edit history)
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I finally got my new water pump shaft installed. As you can see it fits great and I used a stainless shoulder bolt to attach the coupling instead of a pin.  The bolt will make it much easier to work around. On to the fan as I work my way around to the left side.

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Did you have any problem getting that iron oil plug (for the pump shaft bearing) out of the aluminum block? Mine had an aluminum plug which was welded in and broke right off when I tried.....so much for similar metals. I had a huge problem, had to drill it out, tap a bigger hole, find a bigger plug, and clean all the aluminum shards out of the timing gear case. Luckily the gear cover was still off.

 

I see yours is painted, have you taken it out yet?

.

 

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Good question Morgan.  I may not have removed that plug.  I have taken everything else apart all around that plug but can’t remember if I have removed it before painting it.  Guess I should check to be sure.

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Mark,

 

I see that you still have the Blue gasket material between the water pump shaft bearing and the back side of the timing gear case.  Are you planning to remove that and possibly use a Silicone Sealant for the mating surfaces?  Everything sure looks good and especially that new shaft.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry,

 

No I plan to leave that gasket in place and just touch it up so it won't show so much.  If it leaks terribly, then I  will do the silicone I suppose.  It was a thin black gasket when I took it off so I'm hoping that will suffice. 

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Only thing to do in central NY on a snowy/cold day is to check the site - Good Morning Morgan, I redid my 23 Opera Coupe water pump several months ago and repacked with the graphite rope that Bob's sells,  had no leaks when I ran it and easy to install as it comes in two half circle pieces - just my two cents 

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Morgan, 

When they rebuilt my shaft, they inserted rubber seals that do not need any packing material now.  The original packing covers are just for looks.

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