Mark Kikta

1922 engine progress

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1 hour ago, Jim Milewski said:

Only thing to do in central NY on a snowy/cold day is to check the site - Good Morning Morgan, I redid my 23 Opera Coupe water pump several months ago and repacked with the graphite rope that Bob's sells,  had no leaks when I ran it and easy to install as it comes in two half circle pieces - just my two cents 

 

9 degrees F here this morning, snowed yesterday. Perfect weather to not work on the car. I don't know if winters in November are caused by Climate Injustice or Climate Racism, but I don't like it.

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Morgan,

 

I checked my oil plug and it turned with no issue so I must have taken it out and replaced it before painting it.

 

Glad I didn't have your issue.

Mark

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Last evening I fit the fan hub with a new grease fitting to replace the screw used for squirting oil inside the hub.  I plan to keep the hub packed full of grease instead of using oil inside the hub.  I also installed my leather fan belt for now.  Hopefully it works fine or I will replace it with a modern rubber one.  

Fan hub fit with grease fitting.jpg

Fan installed2.jpg

Fan installed3.jpg

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Mark,

Is the machine bolt that holds the fan hub onto the shaft a left-hand threaded one like what is on my 1916 engine?

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I used sticky red grease on my fan hub. Very little splatter with that stuff. My leather fan  belt works perfect with no issues. I did have a simple line of stitching sewn at  the seam. 

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44 minutes ago, Mark Kikta said:

Terry,

 

Yes it is a left hand thread bolt.

 

Mark

 

 

Mine too, as well as the front facing packing nut on the water pump.

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Mark,

If you plan on driving the car, I would go to the local NAPA store and get a serpentine belt for your car.  It falls under the "once and done" philosophy. That is the only thing that I use on my cars because I drive them.

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The packing nuts on the water pump are thread specific, meaning that since the water pump / S/G shaft turns in the same rotational direction as the crankshaft, the packing nut on the 'front' side of the water pump is right hand thread.  The packing nut on the rear side of the water pump is left hand thread as is the packing nut on the rear side of the timing gear case.  Things were done this way so as the shaft rotation would not have a tendency to loosen the packing nuts.  The engineering back in the day was quite amazing to say the least.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Lug nuts on the left side of Mopar in the 50's and 60's were left hand thread. Got a flat tire once and drove it in, watched the grease monkey try for a few minutes to get the lug nuts off. I stopped the kid and told him.....left side of Chrysler products go the other way. Kid got mad, noooooo, wanted to fight me, I said try it. He did, the look on the kid's face was priceless.

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11 minutes ago, Morgan Wright said:

Lug nuts on the left side of Mopar in the 50's and 60's were left hand thread. Got a flat tire once and drove it in, watched the grease monkey try for a few minutes to get the lug nuts off. I stopped the kid and told him.....left side of Chrysler products go the other way. Kid got mad, noooooo, wanted to fight me, I said try it. He did, the look on the kid's face was priceless.

 

Getting off topic here but I'll continue anyway. I was raised on '50s and '60s Chrysler products so I knew about the left hand thread on lug nuts. When I got my '33 Plymouth I assumed it was the same. Fortunately I figured out that they were all right hand thread lug bolts before I busted a gut or damaged the car. Later I got a '63 Dodge pickup. Given the era I knew it had left hand lug nuts on the left side. But I nearly busted a gut (again) before I figured out that some previous owner hand swapped the drums from side to side. Good thing I didn't own an impact wrench in those days or I'd like have damaged things.

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So there has been some discussion about manifold attachment here on the forum but not for early enough years for me.   So I have all the parts cleaned up and all the gaskets from Olsons here ready to attach my manifolds.  Wondering if there are any words of wisdom for this style gasket set for my 1922?  I cleaned up the ring seals but I noticed that the originals are wider than the new ones with Olsons gasket set.    Does anyone have any experience using one vs the other?  Also the copper gaskets are different on one side compared to the other.  Does it matter which side goes towards the engine?

83BACD05-C77F-4386-98DA-1B536E196BAE.jpeg

D2C749D3-E087-4814-B190-5C5EB7571535.jpeg

007DB985-E9FB-40F4-B0AE-694AD959BD40.jpeg

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Mark,

 

You made my day with your photos.  I was wondering where I would have to go for the manifold split rings.  The crush gaskets are pretty much a one time use thing.  I would put the solid flat surface to the block.  Also, I would install the split rings with the gap at the top.  There has been some discussion with the straight eight guys about movement of the manifolding once the engine heats up.  I'm sure our sixes will have some movement also.  A person will want to do everything possible to minimize the possibility of cracking a manifold casting.  Looking good.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Here is a picture I found of these crush gaskets when I removed them. It looks like they were installed both ways. They had the all copper sides both towards the engine and towards the manifold.

223FB937-5FBF-425E-9E26-BFE2A959C2DD.jpeg

56C7313B-E135-477F-AEA5-9A9669CC3CEB.jpeg

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Never had mine off

 

Are the intake facing one way and exhaust another?  Just a guess.  

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Ben,

 

Thats interesting.  Yes I was talking about those split rings.  Even my 1939 Chevrolet has the split rings and I put them back in when I rebuilt the engine.  Did you order the whole gasket set or just the manifold set?  I ordered an engine rebuild set. 

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Brian,

 

I think only 1 or 2 exhaust gaskets faced inward and all others faced outward.  I think unless I learn otherwise I agree with Terry,  I’ll put the all copper side towards the engine.

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On 11/12/2019 at 10:26 PM, Morgan Wright said:

Did you have any problem getting that iron oil plug (for the pump shaft bearing) out of the aluminum block? Mine had an aluminum plug which was welded in and broke right off when I tried.....so much for similar metals. I had a huge problem, had to drill it out, tap a bigger hole, find a bigger plug, and clean all the aluminum shards out of the timing gear case. Luckily the gear cover was still off.

 

I see yours is painted, have you taken it out yet?

.

 

plug.jpg

 

On 11/12/2019 at 11:10 PM, Mark Kikta said:

Good question Morgan.  I may not have removed that plug.  I have taken everything else apart all around that plug but can’t remember if I have removed it before painting it.  Guess I should check to be sure.

 

.

.

This guy has a flip top oiler at that location. I think that's the best of all:

 

 

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I like the short video where it shows the whirlygig in the oil sight gauge.  It appears that the oil coming off the pump is rather erratic.  When this all goes back together on my engine and dash panel, the gauge and lines will be as clean as a whistle and the little wheel will be spinning like a top.  It always did when my Dad had the car.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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35 minutes ago, Terry Wiegand said:

I like the short video where it shows the whirlygig in the oil sight gauge.  It appears that the oil coming off the pump is rather erratic.  When this all goes back together on my engine and dash panel, the gauge and lines will be as clean as a whistle and the little wheel will be spinning like a top.  It always did when my Dad had the car.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

 

Depends on the RPM.

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The oil whirligig will run a lot faster when the engine is warm too.

 

I think the erratic rotation is due to slop between the pivot pin and the rotating part. Nothing to worry about

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The little pin in the center of the indicator that the whirligig rotates on.

Mine is sluggish at startup and when the oil heats it spins like heck even at an idle.

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My mechanics got a big laugh out of it when I got my car inspected. I said "That's the oil pressure gauge" and got even more laughs.

 

(Passed inspection.)

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For what it is worth, the pump puts out about 5 to 7 psi, but that is only to fill the dip troughs, so it doesnt mean much. It is the volume that counts.
 

That system isnt uncommon with the older stuff.

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