auburnseeker

The toy box and the big shop, my New shop Build.

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The trim is 6 inch for around the doors and windows with 8 inch corner boards,  garage door trim, as well as top and bottom banding boards.

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Hate to see that snow because it means short daylight and slowed progress.  But, it’s looking great.

 

 I found a pump truck capability chart and it looks promising.  I’ll try to post it.

 

http://www.pumppartners.com/documents/schwing31htreach.pdf

 

this shows maybe 8-10 feet ?

Edited by JoelsBuicks (see edit history)

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I saw that chart online as well.  I was trying to figure if they have the room to unfold it and get the boom through the doorway as I think it's around 40 to 50 feet to the bank from the garage door.  That first section of boom looks like it has to be at the 13 foot height.  I'll wait to finish it off until i get a definitive answer. 

I might have to call the concrete guys.  The only problem i have is I probably won't use the guys that did the rest as a friend's floor didn't turn out well that they did,  but the other company did a beautiful job on the projects they have been doing.   They are a little more money,  but this is one job you only do once. 

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On 7/16/2018 at 9:57 AM, auburnseeker said:

On another note.  I won't be able to afford paving the place anytime soon.  I was wondering if anyone has done pavers in front of their shop?  What are the pros or cons?  Especially in a setting that gets snow and will be plowed.   Again thinking down the road here. 

 

At my old shop in Florida I was able to find about 6000 Augusta brick pavers (1920's street pavers)

for the front of the barn.  Each weighted 8 pounds and was 4"X8"X4" thick, a lot of work to  get them level, but they looked period perfect with the rough sawn cypress B & B siding and my gas pumps.

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Concrete is still a year out atleast. I'm waiting for a quote on a nice craftsman style garage door.  The guy said he though it would come ion cheaper than the other doro with real glass windows so we will see. If it's too much,  I'll be building them.  

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That's going o be a great shop. Did you compare the cost of a steel building ? Your structure is large enough there might not have been a big difference in price.

 

Greg

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The benefits of steel were minor,  though maybe cheaper,  I wanted a shingled roof and wood siding so just the framing would have been steel.   The few guys I talked to wanted to just sell me a steel package including siding and roof.   I think with labor I have around 60 in the shell without any windows or doors finished as you see it.  That doesn't include the concrete but that wasn't included in the steel prices either. 

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Another thought is insulation.  I waited for two years after I moved in, then had foam insulation blown in from the top of the walls up in the gable ends and the entire bottom of the roof.   Added a Reznor gas furnace hanging from the sissor trusses.  I leave it on 35 degrees  all winter and can go in a bump the thermostat to 55 and I'm set for the day.  Take less than 1/2 hour to get the whole place to 55.  A great working temperature.   I recommend you do that before you fill the building with stuff to cover, maybe even before the concrete.  I insulated my walls as I needed display space for my American Picker's Collection of stuff, or hung cabinets  My theroy is waste no floor space with junk.  Also consider a floor drain in front of the door where you drive in with snow on your tires.

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I was planning on 12 inches of roxul with atleast 1 inch of rigid foam inside for a thermal barrier with the foil face in the ceiling and 8 inches of roxul with that same minimum 1 inch Foam in the walls.  Should be able to easily heat it after a good bean supper. 

Seriously though,  I'm thinking of an outdoor multifuel boiler to run this and the house.  with possibly another tap to run the old garage. There is a place to locate it centrally between all 3 and I can run the lines down the powerline so the digging might not be as hard as I won't have to go through every tree root on the property.  After working out there today with an inside temperature in probably the teens or low 20's I can't even imagine the day I will finally pour a floor much less actually start insulating.  When you are doing it as pay as you go,  it's a slow process.   Especially when you are the one doing all the work and still running your business 7 days a week. 

I'm, still waiting on a quote for a garage door.  Once I get that I can decide whether to build or buy a door.  If it comes in under 3G,  I think I'm going to just bite the bullet.  That will take a good month of sales to try to come up with that.  I can open it back to 14 feet though and not have a worry about the cement trucks.  They will be able to pour the floor without a pump truck then. 

For inside junk,  I have been trying to keep everything on pallets so I can move them with my tractor.  If I pour it in 2 sections i can also do half,  then move everything to the finished half and pour the rest the next month or so.   Then nothing will have to be outside otehr than Bertha. 

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5 hours ago, Paul Dobbin said:

Also consider a floor drain in front of the door where you drive in with snow on your tires.

If you do put in a pre cast trench drain system go with Mea being a much nicer  cast with very little porosity. I would also go with a metal rail and maybe even a cast rail to take the load to prevent a failure. Stay away from plastic only polymer concrete! If you want to get fancy you could go with Iron Age grating system in cast steal or even nickel bronze picking out the pattern you like. But you will have to watch what patter you choose as some are not high heel friendly when the ladies might come in and see what you are up to.

One more thing go with hot dipped galvanized and not galvanised as there is a big difference when you are talking road salt..

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)

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Do you need to prepare the outside pavement base to prevent frost lifting it? I was wondering if tiles or paving slabs would be good enough; they heave all over the place?

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Without a septic system they won't allow a floor drain.  I am a long way from worrying about though. 

 

I'm not sure about frost heaving with the pavers.  But I suppose there would have to be some. 

I'll worry about the door and siding first so I can get my CO. 

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2 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

I'm not sure about frost heaving with the pavers.  But I suppose there would have to be some. 

If you can exclude water, it should be minimal. But that means no-fines gravel under it to some depth plus deep drainage to keep the water table below the gravel. My brother's area in Lincoln, MA requires 5' deep foundations to prevent frost and tree heave.

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"I'm, still waiting on a quote for a garage door.  Once I get that I can decide whether to build or buy a door.  If it comes in under 3G,  I think I'm going to just bite the bullet.  That will take a good month of sales to try to come up with that.  I can open it back to 14 feet though and not have a worry about the cement trucks.  They will be able to pour the floor without a pump truck then."

 

Does your local concreteing services have a concrete line pump?   These are like the boom pumps but they run the hose over the ground instead of through a boom and can pump the concrete across the ground up to 150 meters from the truck.   They are commonly used where concrete is required inside an existing building where the boom type can't reach.

 It may be worthwhile contacting your local concrete plant to see what's avalible before you decide on the door.

 

Edited by DavidAU (see edit history)

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10 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

If you can exclude water, it should be minimal. But that means no-fines gravel under it to some depth plus deep drainage to keep the water table below the gravel. My brother's area in Lincoln, MA requires 5' deep foundations to prevent frost and tree heave.

I have it well pitched for drainage by the building but there is one area along the outside where the water will stay for part of a day until it leaches down through the ground.   That's probably 25 feet from the building. I was figuring maybe 20 feet out at the most but again another one of those thinking out loud ideas that probably won't come to fruition. 

I'll have to check into the concrete line and see if they offer it around here. 

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I did get the roof on last week,  just before another round of snow as you can see.  Fortunately I got it done before it hit 5 below zero with a day time high of 17.  

I cut a few hundred pieces of soffit to length yesterday and added a few nailers inside,  then did a little clean up.   It was still rather frigid inside with the previous day having only been 24 for a high so the building was still probably in the low 20's inside.  I never though we would be dealing with such prolonged unseasonably cold weather.  

Today it has been raining.  So now everything is coated with ice.  You just can win,  though I will continue to trudge on this winter.  I can't wait to actually start putting siding up.  

I have a bunch of flashing to bend up.  I think I will move that into the heated garage though.

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I just got a price from the local guy for a fully insulated I believe Clopay R18 Carriage house 16 by 14 foot door.  Without opener fully installed with the arched windows it's just shy of 4G.  It's similar to this one,  but obviously going to be taller but the width is the same.  That's in a wood tone which I still have to pick the color of.  Should look good with the brown siding and green trim,  since I will have similar finished wood soffits as you can barely see in the previous posts for the roof return.  I hate to spend the money,  but it is a major focal point and I won't be building swinging doors with 500 to 1000 worth of hardware not to mention the lumber to later replace with something like this.  Looks like I better get to selling to try to make up the shortfall.  Of course like everything I didn't want to spend more than 2500 for a door but found one that's what I really want for more.  

He says it's about 4 weeks out once I order it,  so it's time to get serious. 

That also will take care of any worry about cement trucks fitting in the door.  

Looks like I better take that framed down opening out.  Of course it's nailed and not screwed in. 

I'll add hardware to the outside at some point to dress them up like real carriage house doors. 

 

I have some real nice literature offered on Ebay right now if anyone wants to help the garage door fund ;) with lots more to come. 

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I completely agree with your thought about it being a big focal point for your shop.  Maybe better said is that anything less than a first class door job will detract from that nice architecture. 

 

I would wager that you can use the time saved to pay for the additional cost.

 

There may be a chance to save some labor.  I bought a 12’w x 14’h insulated door I think it was about $900 with all hardware. The labor quote was around $900 and I ended up installing this door myself.  It was no problem at all.  Perhaps this is something to consider?

 

I get the chills looking at those pics.  Too frozen too soon!

 

 

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With the size of the doors and winding those springs,  I'll pay the labor charge.  I get weak in the knees around garage door springs. Especially ones big enough to raise that door.  besides if they break something putting them in it's on them and I couldn't get help to install them as They are definitely not a one man job.  

It's snowing outside right now after raining all day.  A little accumulation.  They are saying could result in 5 to 8 inches depending.  With another 1 to 3 in snow squalls scheduled for tomorrow. 

I'll be ordering that door in the next 2 days I think as long as they get back to me and I can decide on the color.  Hopefully I'll have a door by New years. 

Yes way too early.  Over a month earlier than last year and temperatures have been trending 10 to 15 degrees below normal almost every day.  Hard to feed us in the Northeast the planet is burning up theory when we have had record cold that won't leave for a month now. 

They are even mis recording it as they called our low at 3 degrees one day when everybody had -5 and colder.  

Even one of the weathermen in an article on the news was saying he's getting tired of having to look back to the beginning of data keeping at all the record colds we keep breaking. 

I'm much happier sweating to death than freezing.  Seems a warm planet would be better than a cold one as well.  Nothing grows in frozen soil, but plants will thrive in warm weather.   It takes alot more energy to heat everything than it does to cool a few select things as well. 

I bought an AC unit for my old super insulated garage for the warm humid summer we had and never turned it on as it never reached over 72 inside.  So far the heat has run just about every day for the last month just to keep it at 50 degrees.  

Besides all the energy needed to move the white accumulation and tons of salt the highway department continually puts down to try to melt it.   

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18 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

I get the chills looking at those pics.  Too frozen too soon!

 

Have you gotten any of this unseasonable weather yet in your neck of the woods?  

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9 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Have you gotten any of this unseasonable weather yet in your neck of the woods? 

 

Our first freeze here came late but it was followed by a record cold day and near record lows.  But our temps are very rarely into single digits and scarcely in the teens.

 

If the unusual cold continues, perhaps the ethanol in our gas will go away and we’ll be encouraged to burn more coal.  or, does that just sound absurd?😉

 

PS - I did recruit a helper for winding the door springs. 

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1 hour ago, JoelsBuicks said:

If the unusual cold continues, perhaps the ethanol in our gas will go away and we’ll be encouraged to burn more coal.  or, does that just sound absurd?😉

 

Makes me think stronger about burning coal.  I'm pretty sure no matter what we do,  we won't match Mother Nature's Carbon foot print in CA alone.   Maybe she's trying to warm the planet up all on her own?

 

8 inches of snow to deal with this morning.  First year I have had to plow 3 times in November, not to mention probably another 3 or so smaller storms I shoveled and leaf blew.  

Of course it rained for the entire day yesterday and thawed the ground just enough that I will dig the crap out of it with the plow.

An hour of shoveling then 2 hours of plowing with another 45 minutes or so of shoveling off my office roof because of the skylights and snow raking the skylight in the kitchen so it doesn't build ice.  Then shoveling that off the deck again.  

How much fun can one guy have?

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Unfortunately I don't drink at all.  I should start though.  It might give me the courage to get stuff done I'm hesitant to do. 

Nothing else the courage to get through this winter.

I went out at 11:30 started with the shovel then got to the tractor,   plowed just a little only to discover 4 - 30 foot trees down.  One on the roof of the shed with all the limbs blocking me from getting to the rest of the driveway to plow then the others down the driveway.  

I cut them all up and dragged them off to my brush pile (quite a ways away) then finished plowing.  Went back out got the snow rake and did the kitchen skylight,  then shoveled the skylights in the office off.  Cleaned all that mess up and finished at 5PM.  Got soaked through all 3 layers the first hour messing with the trees so I came in for a quick break to get rehydrated and dry clothes then plowed for the next 2 and 1/2 or more.   Had to push all the banks back as it's so early in the winter (which hasn't even started ) that I can see getting closed in before January if I'm not careful. 

 

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