auburnseeker

The toy box and the big shop, my New shop Build.

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With my doors pretty much done,  I have gotten back to working on those upper windows.

The 6 I had almost finished cutting down had a strip of raw wood showing on the outside because of the original lap of the Double hung.  

With my latest acquisition a siding brake I was able to make some custom caps.  Having never used on before it took a few minutes and a you tube video to achieve the shape I wanted.  Of course I screwed up a couple first,  but put them in the pile as I can use them for making nailing flanges out of later. After making the first,  I had a pattern and I made quick work of the other 5.  

Here is a shot of before and after as well as one with the caps all lined up before a quick painting to give them a good match to the Pella windows Hartford green.  The paint should be cured enough tomorrow to actually put the windows all together. The way I bent them,  They actually pretty much install without any fasteners. and are pinched in place by the top of the window jamb.  Should look factory when I'm all done,  especially from 12 foot below. 

Now on to the next 6 windows I have to make the jambs from scratch and make them look pretty much the same as the Pella ones on the inside. 

It took a little brain crunching to figure out an easy way to build them with a sloped sill and be able to cap everything exposed outside with metal all while making it look factory.  With a few test bends to get a feel for the capabilities of the brake. I think I have come up with a way to wrap it weathertight. 

I dug through my pile of rejected wood from the garage project,  pulled a bunch of defective boards and ripped them down for window stops.  Then dug my planer out of my car trailer (of course it was in the back in front of my blast cabinet so I had to man handle it over everything to get it out the side door).  Would have been nice to have some help,  but I've learned to work alone pretty well. 

I found the mice had somehow gotten into my trailer (still not sure how as it's a 1 year old trailer I leave closed up) and built a big nest under the planer.  I'm still not sure what they built it out of as nothing looks like any of the material I had in the trailer.  Fortunately they didn't build it in the planer and the planer looks to be untouched.  It worked fine as well.  Of course after a little lubrication.  I don't think I have used it in 4 or 5 years. 

Hopefully tomorrow I can get some of the other 6 windows built.  I have the jambs all cut. 

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I finally have some progress to show.  

That pesky work thing keeps getting in the way so I don't get to spend as much time working on the shop as I would like.  

Being self employed working at home you still have to make sure all the daily stuff gets done before the garage work starts as that doesn't pay the bills,  only adds to them.

Alot of time has been spent trying to figure out how to achieve a factory look on the windows when done so they resemble the Pe'lla windows I cut down.  The inside was fairly easy.  The outside a bit trickier as  I have to make sure they will be pretty much rot proof once wrapped with metal.  I also built the first one,  keeping in mind that I had 5 more to do,  so I could build them assembly line style.  Overall it worked pretty good,  but was a bit more time consuming than I thought.  The sills have an 8 degree pitch for water run off.  I also made it with some work,  they could be taken apart if necessary to replace the sash if the window ever failed. Though you could probably just take the whole unit out as easy and take it apart to replace it. 

Not having ever had or used a brake,  it takes a little trial and thinking to see if the bends I'm desiring can be achieved and which bend has to be done first.  

Here I show a sample of the sill wrap with a nailing flange I bent up. I'm still trying to figure out the best way to attach it.  Probably 1/2 inch flathead Stainless screws, 3 or 4 to a side at this point.  I plan to wrap the whole thing,  mask the sash,  then paint the unit in the correct green. Seems easier than trying to paint all the pieces then assemble and all the screw heads will be painted as well in one shot that way.

I finish sanded all the inside pieces before assembly so I can just stain and varnish them when I'm ready.

I also cut insulation to fill the gaps around the sash to make them more energy efficient rather than using solid wood.  I'll get a can of spray foam tomorrow to fill the small corners. 

Hopefully I can get all the metal bent up tomorrow.  With the test pieces already made it should take long to duplicate them. 

 

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I wonder if I should try to make a drip edge on that sill?  I'm not sure if I can make that bend on my brake.  I might give it a try tomorrow.  It would probably be a good idea,  although the nailing flange will stop water from getting back in the sill,  but in an extreme even it could run back behind my window casing and then down behind the siding,  though this window will be about 12 inches below my 2 foot overhang so unless it's horizontal rain,  it will probably never get wet in the first place.  Do the rest of you overthink stuff as well? 

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5 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

Do the rest of you overthink stuff as well? 

 

Been known to. Problem I have is overthinking and overbuying tools or blades or bits and such. Buy them and then realize you have some already that you overbought for the last project. 

 

Back on subject, I like drip edges can never go wrong with adding one. Add it...

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We'll see if it's possible with the brake.  That's getting complicated for the old noggin to figure which way to bend it first.  Might need to put the thinking tewk (no idea how to spell that) on for that one. 

We'll see tomorrow. 

Seems with tools and bits we keep buying because we can't find them.  Many probably won't surface again until our estate sales. ;)

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So it took some serious brain work but I came up with a way to put a drip edge on those windows.

I tried bending 1 piece every sequence possible but couldn't find a way to make them on one piece,  so I decided to split it into 2 pieces with a lip to lock them together once installed.  Overall I think this is better than the way I was going to do it.  There were going to be 2 pieces anyways,  this just puts the seam in a different spot.  I actually bent up all the sill pieces and made a quick template for the underneath pieces with the nailing flange.  Seems very strong the way it came out. I should be able to bang out all the bottom pieces in short order tomorrow.  Again lots of figuring involved so that it's sealed as best as possible with no water traps. I think I'm going to do a 2 piece top cap as well in similar fashion. 

The overhang on the ends will be trimmed and bent over to seal everything up. 

I'll Silicone all the seams when I put it togehter as well,  where the water would have a chance to enter and leave all the downside ones open so any water intrusion can drain out. 

Hopefully I can get the metal work done on these tomorrow, then they will be ready for installation.  I have some final framing work to do on each opening as I wasn't sure what height they were going to be located when we framed the walls. 

The sun was setting just as I was coming in and I stumbled across this barn find.  I better get that ford out and Dust it off or it will be one you read about years from now. 

Hot weather is coming end of the week,  near 100 degrees, so it might be a good time to go over the brakes on that Ford so I can get it on the road. 

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Some progress.  I finally have all the metal bent.  72 pieces, all containing 2 to 5 bends.  I burned up a 2 foot by 50 foot roll of flashing with probably only 3 feet of waste total and that's trimmings. 

I assembled the first window.  Took almost 3 hours,  I had to rip some lumber down for all of them though so it wasn't exclusive.  

I put the next one together in about an hour or so. 

Hopefully I can finish them all up tomorrow. All the channels lock together and the only thing fastened is the window stops.  They are screwed in from the outside so you don't see any fasteners.   I did use a few staples which will be inside the wall just to tack things together tight before I drill for the screws. 

This was the first time I ever used a brake to make anything.   They aren't perfect,  but I have to rememeber they are going to be 13 feet off the ground.  I still have to paint them to match the sashes but hopefully that won't be too involved. 

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I would have mitered the corners,  but I think this gives better water shed.  Here are a couple of more shots.  Tolerances are a bit tight.  I had a time trying to slide the lock strips on the first window,  but I lightly oiled the male tracks and they slide in much easier on the second.  I didn't really want to use a lubricant as I'm going to paint the windows,  but I'll wipe them down with lacquer thinner really well first.  Hopefully that will keep the fish eyes away.  I also used it pretty sparingly. 

The junk leftover wainscoting is coming in handy. 

 

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Looks like good progress. If the barn find is in the way or an unknown orphan I can come by and get it out of your way. No charge and I wouldn’t even need help doing it.  

Your going to be finished with this project soon with all you are getting done. As a bonus it looks good. Have fun. 

Dave S 

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Hindsight I probably should have bought the windows and been done with it,  but I didn't really have an extra $2000 at the time.  The brake will have other uses so it's an investment.  I'm probably out about 300 in materials to do the windows,  but the labor is starting to really rack up.   Good thing it's free. 

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Well it's taken forever but I finally have real progress to report.  

I finished crafting those 6 new windows with the Pella sashes then finished cutting down all those Pella jambs. I got everything painted, then framed in all the openings.  

In the meantime Big Bertha's steering cylinder snapped off the end so I had to run it up to the welder's and have it fixed.  He did a nice job and 6 dollars later plus another 40 for 1 inch bolts with locking nuts,  the steering is in a little better shape.  

It was nice to have to work off from to cut out the openings then with a contraption I rigged up to roll the tyvek on the building with the lift, Of course a Hornet's nest slowed down the tyvek work a bit until I could get to the store to get some killer to take care of them.   I got one side all set yesterday to put in the first 6 Homemade windows.  Got the first opening caulked,  then rain hit,  so I had to wait it out and for the eves to stop dripping before I could put the one in before the caulk dried.

Today I put the other 5 windows in.  Had it down to about 15 minutes from start to finish including actually getting the window and putting down the sill seal. 

This afternoon,  I got the lift moved around to the other side and got all the openings cut and tyvek on,  but ran out of time as the wife had to head to work to get any windows in.  Hopefully shouldn't take too long to get those other 6 windows in before I get cooked again as it's on the southern side.  I got pretty fried today but was glad to step back and see as much done as I got. 

 

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Really liking those half windows up there. So, you gonna show us the Tyvec install contraption or are you afraid we'll steal your invention, patent it and make a billion $$ off it. As Xander said, nice setting and looks like you have plenty of rocks saved for future landscaping.

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Looks great, and well done. I can see it about a year from now, finished, full, and all the surrounding vegitation nice and green. Any plans to put some type of weather protection over the garage and man doors?

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1 hour ago, MrEarl said:

Really liking those half windows up there. So, you gonna show us the Tyvec install contraption or are you afraid we'll steal your invention, patent it and make a billion $$ off it. As Xander said, nice setting and looks like you have plenty of rocks saved for future landscaping.

I was thinking I should get a shot while it is in action.  I still have to do a 60 foot strip across the back but It's hard to get a shot while I'm in the bucket and no one was around to take one.  If it would have been a car,  Keiser would have just appeared and got the shot. ;)

Yes lots of rocks.  I have some ideas but they would be alot easier to materialize if I had a grapple for my excavator.   Surprisingly I see very few for sale and there really isn't anything left in the budget for more equipment. 

I figured even if we don't use the rocks around the garage,  my other half will find projects for them elsewhere.  It is nice to have a huge rock pile to pick from when you want to build a rock wall, even for flower gardens. 

Those half windows do let in alot more light and help balance the height so it's not so imposing.  I'm hoping with that row on the southern side,  I will get some solar heat as well in the winter. In late spring early summer,  the overhang helps shade them,  but the much lower sun will focus the light and heat in the building.  

All the windows have grids for them so they will match the doors more or less. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Looks great, and well done. I can see it about a year from now, finished, full, and all the surrounding vegitation nice and green. Any plans to put some type of weather protection over the garage and man doors?

I am going to put some type of 2 foot roof at the 16 foot mark if nothing else than to break up that height and give me a break for my siding.   I'm not sure if I will do any more than that.  I was thinking over the garage door to put a matched gable style pair of fake rafters that follows the 6 on 12 roof pitch.   I'm also shrinking that door height down to 12 foot from 14.  I don't have anything that tall or anticipate getting anything that tall.  It could easily be enlarged as it's framed for it. I plan to build swing in Bifold doors with 4 foot wide panels like I did on my shed for now.  Even with hardware they will come in at probably under 500 where as a garage door, and not even one I really like is running in the 6,000 range.  I've overspent already and I'm pretty much tapped out,  so a few days labor is more manageable than that 6G bill.  I think the door I would like to put on is closer to 10G. No power either in the building for a door opener,  so I still have to get out to open and close either.  

Doing the greenery will be nice.  It's hard to envision that far down the road.  But then again,  I wasn't even digging the hole yet for the foundation at this time last year.  and while I was tamping for the footings,  I couldn't wait until I finally could back fill and not have all the holes and rocks to climb over and work around.  Then the same with the drive , the shell, and the roof,  so it all comes togehter eventually but when it comes down to pretty much just you doing the work,  while still earning a living,  those milestones take much longer to achieve making you wonder if you are ever going to reach them.  

My next big milestone is the floor,  but before that I need to get my soffet all done (which will be cetol natural wood color wainscoting)  then the Siding and those doors.

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On another note.  I won't be able to afford paving the place anytime soon.  I was wondering if anyone has done pavers in front of their shop?  What are the pros or cons?  Especially in a setting that gets snow and will be plowed.   Again thinking down the road here. 

 

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Framing for 14 feet and then going down to 12is a great idea.......keeping options open in the future is important. Take photos to show it’s possible, and it helps When twenty years later you don’t remember exactly what you did.......learned this one the hard way. Understand the budget constraints, but just a small blacktop pad in front of each man door and a ten foot pad in front of the big door would be a godsend and probably be good for twenty years......I didn’t do it and regretted it for the next five years, then bit the bullet. Outside air lines and electrical are a must when you get around to doing it. I would also put some wall protectors to be sure no one hits the big door jam going in and out.....another lesson learned! You don’t need protection from yourself......just you family and neighbors! I bet a nice wood stove would make the building comfortable in all except mid December to mid February, so that might be a good option.......plus you could put it near the work bench so even in the very cold weather you could still work on stuff on an emergency basis. It’s a fine shop, and almost everyone here would give their left arm for it. ?

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On 7/16/2018 at 6:57 AM, auburnseeker said:

I was wondering if anyone has done pavers in front of their shop?  What are the pros or cons?

Only thing that would be a concern is that if you drive anything heavy over them they can sink if yo don't have a hard packed base. Had a forklift run over some I had down for a while and it left a dip in them where the forklift tires drove.

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3 minutes ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Only thing that would be a concern is that if you drive anything heavy over them they can sink if yo don't have a hard packed base. Had a forklift run over some I had down for a while and it left a dip in them where the forklift tires drove.

I guess you could pull the dented  area and fill it with stone,  then put them back.  I have been running my 20,000 lb lift around outside and it's pretty packed.  I have alot of stone down for a base with dust so it packs good.   It's probably something I won't end up doing,  but just brainstorming out loud. 

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On ‎7‎/‎16‎/‎2018 at 9:57 AM, auburnseeker said:

On another note.  I won't be able to afford paving the place anytime soon.  I was wondering if anyone has done pavers in front of their shop?  What are the pros or cons?  Especially in a setting that gets snow and will be plowed.   Again thinking down the road here. 

 

On a tour past July went to a fellows private collection up north here. He had two very large buildings facing each other and a smaller workshop off the side. The pad area in the centre was done in pavers with a 1920s  touring out of pavers in the centre. It was very nice and should have taken a picture.  

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Unfortunately no money for concrete inside or out this year. :(

I did just finish putting all the tyvek on all the way around and all the Hurricane plates plus installed the rest of the windows and flashed them all with the flashing tape.  It's progress just very slow as it's so big,  one guy only makes a little dent. 

The 40 ford that was going to be sold to finance my floor has lots of issues I need to address before I market it.  Nothing significant just stupid stuff that wasn't done right.  Not to mention I need to do my soffits and siding before I can get my CO so I can then go in and put the concrete in.  I'll be lucky to get that done before winter.  The only good thing is most of my siding is pre finished as are most of the batten strips.  I'm hoping it goes fairly quick when I get going.  with 14 foot long by 1 foot wide boards,  I should make good progress when the heat breaks. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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I finally have some updates to post.  Though I have been working on the shop in most of my spare time,  which is 6 to 8 hours some days,  the size of the building takes quite a bit of work to actually look like you got something completed. 

I went over to a Friends and bought a bunch of wood for my trim.  We planed out a bunch of rough cut for the bottom banding boards.  I had him deliver those and sawed them all to a similar width so I will be able miter them together when I put them up.  He also delivered a big pile of planed lumber for the rest of my trim.  

The wife and I spent quite a few days staining all of them so I will be able to work in the colder weather putting them up.  My wife over the summer also stained all the batten strips and coated all the wainescoating for the soffits with Cetol.  

Here are a few stacks there are many more not shown.  

All these pieces of green trim required 3 coats of stain.  I think there are 75 to 100 pieces of green trim. It took 5 gallons of stain to coat them.

 

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For real progress I finished all the window installs earlier this summer.  Added my rafter ties and tyvek.

I just added this roof return on the end.  I have all the shingles precut so as soon as the weather breaks I will get the roofing on it.   I never framed one of these before so it took some figuring but I got it eventually.  As with every project this late in the fall,  you finish it up in the dark with a flash light a couple of hours after dark with a storm coming in every time. 

I also framed down my garage door to 12 foot from 14 foot in preparation to build doors for it.  I have to get a quote on a garage door but I don't think it's in the budget at the moment.  I can build swinging doors that look attractive for the cost of the hardware as I have extra 16 foot siding I can use.  I still have to add the tyvek to the reframed opening.  

The lift has been wonderful as I can use it to hold the material in place to nail it as I rarely have any help and have to do everything alone.  

Before I finish my new door opening up,  I was wondering if it will cause a problem for the masons to pour the floor when I finally reach that stage.  Does anyone know if a pump truck will have a problem pumping through my 12 foot high by 16 foot wide door?  I know the trucks are 13 foot 2 inches high to the top of the swivel mount and the boom goes out from there which will mean it's too high unless it can articulate down and through the opening.  I looked at specs on line,  but couldn't quite tell.  Has anyone ever done a pour like that with one through a 12 foot opening?  

This roof return ended up costing me another $1000 plus in just materials. 

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