auburnseeker

The toy box and the big shop, my New shop Build.

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I finally finished one wall.  Well atleast the lower part. (I can't wait to get the garage door in now)  I will wait to do the upper until spring as it has to be all done off the lift.  So that's 60 foot of wall. only another 204 feet of lower wall to go.   I spent the day sorting batten strips and pre cutting a bunch to a close rough length.  Alot of them are defective for full length pieces so it's a lot of sorting to get the good ones.  It was windy and not bad this morning.  I was going to hop out on the lift and do soffits but the temperature dropped all day as the wind howled so I worked inside instead.  lots of small stuff to do to make the siding days as productive as possible.  It's suppose to be cold (highs in the mid to low 20's) so I might sort siding and do the same with that.  It's nice to not waste good weather sorting boards.   Even the siding has alot of rejects.  Might as well use the best stuff I have.  I can pre nail that and cut it to length as well. 

I would love to do cedar shakes or something up top,  but I'm not sure if I will be able to afford it when I get there.   I also have the lumber already prefinished to do it in Board and batten.   I do have 2 large vents to put in up top made out of wood,  like my friend used in the shop I posted earlier. 

 

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Looking good, get the door installed and we can have a party!  Not sure you really want that kind of help but it could be fun!  

Dave S 

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I just did some math and looks like to do the upper part in Quality red cedar shakes would be around 900 and end,  plus whatever stain I would use.  

How come everything is in multiples of 1000?   

A 1000 for the roof return,  1000 for the shakes for the ends,  etc.  

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Wait too long and it will be multiples of 2000’s ! 

Dave S 

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One of the reasons I am trying to get it done. (not to mention a 375 a year permit fee)  As it was I just beat the hurricanes now 2 years ago that spiked prices on materials.  They alone would have added thousands to the project.  The siding I bought from a friend and did some horse trading for as well,  plus he usually gives me a price then cuts it a bit because I remember him when I come across a nice sign or something.  Little things like that make his day, especially when I just give them to him.  

 

 

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You should be proud of your accomplishment of building the shop.......it looks great. The never say die attitude is rare today, and it is plainly clear to me you will be successful in any endeavor you pursue. 👍

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The shop is looking fantasic so far.  You won’t know what to do with yourself when it is “done.”

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41 minutes ago, edinmass said:

You should be proud of your accomplishment of building the shop.......it looks great. The never say die attitude is rare today, and it is plainly clear to me you will be successful in any endeavor you pursue. 👍

Now if I ever finish it and still have that Cord,  it might even hit the road some day. 

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You could split the difference on cost and do the end you consider the front, most visible, in shake shingles and use the rough sawn you already have on the other end. Sounds like you have a lot marginal boards anyway, unless you over bought in the first place, planning for the bad pieces. I did the barn at my old place in rough sawn hemlock and had lots of firewood kindling for years from the bad pieces. I used the worse pieces on the back side where it wasn't visible unless you were snooping.

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I actually did overbuy siding by a bit as I knew there would be some scrap.  The 1000 in materials is actually per end if i go with really good grade shingles.   It would be faster to do it in the board and batten. We'll see.  It will be a few more months to go before I have to worry about that. 

Suppose to be a few real cold days this week so I will be working inside on sorting material and adding nailers inside. 

I should clear space in the heated garage and move the metal brake in there doing that on the really cold days.    There is not alot of room for a 10 foot brake though with room to work on it in there. 

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I just wanted to clarify to anyone reading this,  the goal of this thread wasn't to brag about my shop,  it was to help others see what it takes to build a building this size including:

How long each phase takes

How much every phase costs

Why I went with the materials I did

How one can save money in each phase (depending on abilities and access to equipment)

What things were a waste of money

What kind of usable space this gives you

How little things can really add to the budget that you never planned on just for starters.

 

I welcome anyone else to post their own garage building experiences especially in relation to types of materials, costs and usable space/ set up so anyone in the future viewing this can help decide what is best for them or what x number of dollars will really get them.

 

When I started this thread  I found little information on cost,  other than kit costs,  but that's hard to translate into finished product.  

I also even had a hard time finding any photos of what the difference size buildings gave you for space with vehicles actually parked in them.  

 

I know one member posted they had a metal building done in 90 days turn key.  

Post the details please and a bunch of photos with the dimensions.  It will really help others determine what fits their needs best.  

If you could post even a state as to where your project is/ was located that would be great as well so we can see how your project may apply to our needs in relation to snow loads or even insulation codes as they vary all over the country.

 

 

I know another trip to the lumber yard today for another 20 2x4's to be cut up for nailers,  another roll of 2 foot by 50 foot flashing to make more caps for the band board as well as 3- 5 lb boxes of siding nails ran me $270.  Again another chunk of money I wasn't planning on spending. 

Bitter cold coming in here as well so I ripped much of the 2 rolls of flashing I have up to bend and will probably move the brake into the heated shop as I have nearly 50 8 foot pieces to bend. 

I can't wait for my door to arrive which is suppose to be next week.  The wind cranking through that opening today required me to bundle up in Long johns and even snow pants and ear muffs to keep from freezing.  Even then you could feel that chill working it's way in. 

I have been burning scraps on days with little to no wind in a fire pit,  which works nice to get rid of the scraps and warm the hands. 

I won't know what to do the first time i have 50 degree weather to work in again. 

 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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When I built the barn for my daughters horses I was on a ladder nailing in siding. I did not have a nail gun. We had a rather large Percheron two year old draft horse that weight about 2200 pounds and thought he was my lap dog, as I was the one who fed him. He loved to untie my shoes. Being on a ladder and having a beast untie your shoes is a bit unnerving. 

He would grab the lace pull it the run and hide behind a 6x6 post!  Of course he was a bit wider. You haven’t had to put up with that at least but I don’t envy you for some of the comments you have had to endure building this. Please keep posting as I find it most informative and interesting. 

Dave S 

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I've been hand nailing all the siding as it draws it in better. Pre starting all the nails is a huge time saver especially up at the ladder heights.  I can even do it on a crappy day so on the good days I can fly with siding.  

Looks like I'll be adding nailers this week and moving all the lumber I put in my way to get access to where I have to put them.  

My new Hitachi cordless framing nailer says it only works down to 23 degrees,  so I'll have to see how true that is.  I'm thinking I can keep it in the heated garage and just bring it out to do a bunch of nailing once I get them in place then put it back in the garage to keep it warm.  I'll let you all know how that works out.  I do like the nailer otherwise.  It was the right fit and a little more than the paslode but doesn't require the gas cartridges. 

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Many of us do appreciate your detailed accounts of time taken, cost of specific stages etc.  I am also involved with a new shop building so your ongoing updates are of great interest. My project is on a much smaller scale however all the information in your posts is helpful once I scale it down about 50%.

 

Greg in Canada

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I like the board & batten look, probably because that's what I did.  To save work and have a better finish, I primed all my boards and battens before nailing them up,  I also painted all seams with finish color before putting the battens up.  All the battens had to be angle nailed to help stop shrinkage and gaps as the wood dried.  Result was repainting  and a color change at 5 years old, there was very little to caulk.  

Suggestion:  While you are adding nailers, add a 2"X10'" nailer for a shed roof on the side between the upper and lower windows.  The left side looks like the space would be great for  s shed roof.

You will always find stuff to store that does not need an enclosure (Tractors, building supplies, future project cars, trailers, etc.

A roofed area beside the barn is a good economical solution as well as a future project to fully enclose.  You know what we all say, you can't build to big a space.

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I'm torn on whether I will add a porch type deal at some point to that side as it limits getting a tractor or lift down that side for maintenance.  I had at one point thought though I could put a shed roof, maybe off the back as it's about 10 foot wide to the bank which would put stuff completely out of sight.  Though at this size,  I better not "fill it". the idea is to get something, play with it then sell it to get the next.   I do plan on some kind of partial loft at some point inside for storage.  I also have the 28 by 50 with the loft and the 8 by 30 foot shed.  The wife might put the cabosh on any more buildings. 

I'll probably sell the lift when I'm done with the outside and get a smaller one or a 4 wheel drive scissor lift to replace it.

I did actually prefinish all the board and batten figuring the shrinkage would expose seems if I didn't.  It was easier to stain flat as well than vertical.   The wood is now atleast 3 years dry with one being stickered in my garage so I'm hoping shrinkage from here on our will be minimal.   We'll see.  Always looks good on paper.  Real life proves different. 

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A shop I saw pictures of back a few years, I think on this forum, had a great setup for a loft. The position of his car lift was such that when he backed a pickup on, he could raise the truck to move items directly to the loft from the back of the pickup bed. A large multipurpose elevator.

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I haven't posted any updates as I have been waiting to make some real progress.  Mother nature and crap luck has really delayed it. 

The heater went out in my heated garage last week with several days of below zero forecast, so I spent 2 days researching and trying to fix it.  I finally called the fellow I bought it from and bought a replacement from him.  Another $700 I wasn't planning on spending, but it's a twin so I can rebuild mine (needs the burn chamber cleaned and rebuilt, which I didn't have the parts for) for a spare for at most $200.  They swap out in 10 minutes so that will be a bit of insurance.

After getting that up,  the temps dropped to day time highs in the teens.   Needless to say the inside temperature of the shop (especially without the garage door on)  was about 13.  

I did slowly peck away at installing nailers and have gotten almost half of the building done.  Another 20 2x4's with a box of 4000 nails for the Hitachi cordless framing nailer ran another 130 bucks at the Lumber yard.  See those little things keep adding up. 

On Saturday we got a blizzard with close to 2 feet of snow.  The bottom though dry because it was so cold was very dense and hard to plow.  It took 7 hours to plow out the property and another 2 of shoveling.  Of course,  that's when the battery crapped out in the tractor.  I was able to finally boost it and get it going. Because of where it's located you have to take it part way out to boost it.  A bunch of trips up to the other garage for tools and some choice words,  but we were finally in business. That shot Sunday.  Final clean up and battery replacement (another $140)  with some snow raking and a bit more plowing shoveling shot Monday.  Monday's high was 1.  Overnight low of -15.  

The new garage door was suppose to be installed Monday but got put off because of the temps.  We rescheduled for Tuesday,  but again overnight low of -15 with a high eventually reaching about 10 so it got put off until Thursday.  Now it's rained about 6 inches since yesterday afternoon.  The absolute last thing you could want after 2 feet of snow and the previous day starting out at -15.  Everything is covered with a very heavy layer of ice.  I don't understand how Forecasters can't comprehend the amount of time it takes to warm up -15 or colder ground temperatures.  They were saying the freezing rain would change to all rain in the late afternoon yesterday.  

Anyways,  lets hope it stops and I can get everything sanded so I can finally get that door in.   I'll work on nailers again later today unless the 600 foot driveway softens up enough I can go shovel it off.    I'm not real optimistic about that though. 

I have been plowing out the sides of the garage as well so I can get easy access to them with the lift if I ever get back to siding.  

That snow pushed hard the first few passes and had to be done with the blade half way up to plow the top off.  The tractor really got a work out.  I had to plow the drive downward at angles as I could barely drive the tractor across the flat ground through the snow without the blade down. 

There were really no snowbanks prior to this storm so that's all from the one storm.  I couldn't imagine plowing it with a pickup.  I even buried the tractor once as everything underneath was ice before the storm(that's with chains on all 4's and 4 wheel drive).  So I had to shove that out.  First time that has even happened. 

 

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Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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YIKES!

And I thought our 6 inch snow fall was bad...

Always have to appreciate what others have to deal with and then say, Guess It's not so bad after all.

Good luck with everything!

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Well that rain ended up being about 6 inches worth.  Not good when the ground was so froze.  It took a long time to switch and though I threw down salt (which I rarely use). the driveway that it broke up reglazed over when the temperatures dropped.   Worst part was the Garage door guys were coming so I had to get everything sanding for them.  I use 5 gallon pails full and used 8.  

Of course while they were here, we had another quick 1 inch storm that coated everything.  I went out and blew it off to expose the sand but blew part of the sand away (though I was being careful) so I had to go back out and sand again.  

Here is the new door though.  

This was 5300 installed with the opener.  I did get an extra "free" section incase I ever bunger one up.  One window was cracked new out of the box,  so they are going to bring a replacement.  One of the keyless remotes wouldn't work either so they are going to bring a new one back when they come to fix the window.  

It's a Clopay Garage door.  16 foot by 14 foot with automatic commercial grade opener.   The door is suppose to be rated at an R18.  

I did inquire about putting a solid panel at the top and starting the glass one down,  but eventually decided this would be OK.  If it was easy.  I would have like to seen it both ways.   I couldn't find any done that way on line as really big carriage house doors are failry uncommon. 

The only real thing I wish I would have done different was use 3/4 inch jambs instead of the 2 inch as the weatherstrip touches and actually goes over the edge of one of the window trim pieces.  They framed my garage door opening kind of tight,  but then again they were following what the masons did and they set it pretty narrow. 

This is something to keep in mind when building your own,  though rarely do you have all the details figured out when you are at the concrete state when doing it by yourself.

I could always pull those jambs off down the road and replace them with 3/4 inch then just replace the casings as well. Not a huge job.  We'll see how much it bugs me down the road.  It will be along time before i have to think about heating it.  

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I'll have to get some pictures on a sunny day as everything looks dark and washed in these. 

I told the wife it needs some ornamental brackets on the roof return or something now stained the color of the door.  Doug fir 4x4 with Cetol would be a similar color. 

Eventually I plan on stone work around the bottom as well.  Should help set it off. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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It’s a good looking door. With it installed the inside is probably up to a balmy 20-22 degrees. Just right for working and not breaking a sweat right? 

Looks good

Have fun

Dave S

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1 hour ago, SC38DLS said:

With it installed the inside is probably up to a balmy 20-22 degrees. Just right for working and not breaking a sweat right? 

Right on.  It was exactly 20 inside when I looked at the thermometer.  Atleast it reduces the wind chill some.  Though the draft on the bottom might need addressing at some point.   I can already see that R18 paying for itself.  It was 19 outside.  

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On 1/10/2019 at 5:40 PM, auburnseeker said:

I just wanted to clarify to anyone reading this,  the goal of this thread wasn't to brag about my shop,  it was to help others see what it takes to build a building this size including:

How long each phase takes

How much every phase costs

Why I went with the materials I did

How one can save money in each phase (depending on abilities and access to equipment)

What things were a waste of money

What kind of usable space this gives you

How little things can really add to the budget that you never planned on just for starters.

 

I welcome anyone else to post their own garage building experiences especially in relation to types of materials, costs and usable space/ set up so anyone in the future viewing this can help decide what is best for them or what x number of dollars will really get them.

 

When I started this thread  I found little information on cost,  other than kit costs,  but that's hard to translate into finished product.  

I also even had a hard time finding any photos of what the difference size buildings gave you for space with vehicles actually parked in them.  

 

I know one member posted they had a metal building done in 90 days turn key.  

Post the details please and a bunch of photos with the dimensions.  It will really help others determine what fits their needs best.  

If you could post even a state as to where your project is/ was located that would be great as well so we can see how your project may apply to our needs in relation to snow loads or even insulation codes as they vary all over the country.

 

 

I know another trip to the lumber yard today for another 20 2x4's to be cut up for nailers,  another roll of 2 foot by 50 foot flashing to make more caps for the band board as well as 3- 5 lb boxes of siding nails ran me $270.  Again another chunk of money I wasn't planning on spending. 

Bitter cold coming in here as well so I ripped much of the 2 rolls of flashing I have up to bend and will probably move the brake into the heated shop as I have nearly 50 8 foot pieces to bend. 

I can't wait for my door to arrive which is suppose to be next week.  The wind cranking through that opening today required me to bundle up in Long johns and even snow pants and ear muffs to keep from freezing.  Even then you could feel that chill working it's way in. 

I have been burning scraps on days with little to no wind in a fire pit,  which works nice to get rid of the scraps and warm the hands. 

I won't know what to do the first time i have 50 degree weather to work in again. 

 

Good job on the shop. Looking at the cold your dealing with in building is part of the reason why I left NY for TX. Plus out here no permitting. No zoning.  You just build anything you want. My property had a dairy barn built in the late 30's on it which I turned the milking room into my brewery, the cow stalls into my metal and wood shop, and the office into my gun shop.  Have been steadily adding garage space onto the back as money and time permits. Up to 5 cars now.  The house I live in I also built myself and the saloon for the antique brewery advertising as well.  Don't give up!  Anything worth having is worth double doing it yourself.  Mine has been a 22 year project and still going most likely until I am taking a dirt nap.

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12 hours ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

I turned the milking room into my brewery

My milking room is now the welding room with a 2,500 lb. table in the centre. Being an all metal room makes it spark friendly. I did put in a smog hog to clean the air when the doors are closed in the winter for the heat. Stalls are gone with one half storage and the other half for restoration and machine shop. I do work for myself only now as my cars used to sit. If someone is stuck though I do help them out.  

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