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2 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

I'm learning a lot and having a good time!

That's what it's all about. We have several automotive paint supply places around Tucson.  The one company I use always goes over everything in detail and what to expect out of the products they sell. When they mixed my gallon of paint for the car the tint was off a bit from the first quart I used to paint the firewall.  They told me to bring it back and they would see what went wrong.  We figured out what the error was and adjusted it to the right match.  He was willing to mix a new gallon for free if I wanted. 

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Slightly off topic....friend with a red Mazda2 - wife dinged a door fatally. Went to Pullapart (Pickapart here in Oz), found a cheap door, but only in blue. Cheap so it will have to do, worry about painting it later. Within a week he saw another Mazda2 - blue, but with a Red door in the same position ! Managed to catch the owner, who readily agreed to a swap , if he did the work. Easy - 2 happy drivers.

jp 26 Rover 9

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Stripped the door back down to metal with exception of where I did the bodywork, two coats of primer, touch-up bodywork, seal coat of primer, new base coat and cleared.  Base coat went on great and was a fantastic match to the door mirror.  Very happy with the color matching.  Unfortunately I botched the clear coat.  The test spray was fine and I had the gun dialed in well but the procedure for shooting this clear is a little different.  They want the first coat to have the "look" of the last coat, ie; no dust coat to get started.  As such I went just a tad slower and sprayed a full wet coat to start... and it ran.   If I had shot with my normal pace it would have been fine so I really just kinda psyched myself out and screwed it up.  The next two coats went on with little issue.  I'll sand out the runs tomorrow and either buff that or shoot another coat.  I learned three good lessons.  1) Trust yourself.  2) Need a better test panel for spray outs.  3) Need lights at hip height for horizontal panels.   All in all I'm pretty excited.  I think I can create a nice booth that will take at most a day to setup and less to take down.  With that booth I'm confident I can get a show car worthy paint job.  

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Nice job.  I too was a little nervous when I started to paint the fenders.  I kept thinking. I hope I don't screw this up.  It gets better the more you do it.  If you sand out the runs, cut and buff you will be fine or sand and shoot it again works too.  I guess it's time to start getting that paint booth ready to go.

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Only practice help to notice that the quantity of paint is the right one just before the run(s). And even with practice, I managed to do runs when the light is not optimal.

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8 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Only practice help to notice that the quantity of paint is the right one just before the run(s). And even with practice, I managed to do runs when the light is not optimal.

 

It seems that it wasn't just pace, my overlap was off in the middle of the door.  Instead of 50% I probably did close to 100% on one pass because I had a hard time seeing where I had been on the previous pass and that caused the issue.  The runs are only on that one pass which, of course, happened to be in the middle of the door. :(  

 

Obviously more practice will help and I think having more light on the sides will help me see the overlap better.  

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With the exception of a Citroën 2 Chevaux I sprayed during my stay at a body shop mid sixties (with mixed results), I never painted such a large part like your door. I only painted smaller parts or the ones which are not so important like the firewall or the inner side of the trunk lid. As you pointed, it's difficult without the appropriate light to see what you are spraying.

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They're not runs, they're sags! At least that's what the body shop men call them. It does sound a little better anyway! Sand, sand, and then buff. Sag all gone. Dark colors are the worst and even my painter, who does it for a living, put a sag in one of my fenders and that's why he still has it. He has sanded it away, now he needs to buff it. It happens to everyone one time or another.

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Got the door sanded down and reasonably level on Monday and first available time to shoot it was today.  First coat went great but the second and third didn't flow out as well.   I didn't get any runs and there's plenty of clear so I should be able to get it flattened and cut/buff without issue.   Another lesson learned is, at a bare minimum, get different cups for primer, base and clear.   The clear was pretty aggressive and managed to loosen up some of the black epoxy primer hidden somewhere in the gun and reduce the effectiveness of the gun.  I take great care to clean the gun and I thought it was clean, but the clear showed me it wasn't.  I think that was the reason the last two coats (particularly the last) didn't flow out well.  I was even having trouble getting the correct fan size.   Going over the gun afterwards it was apparent that the cup was where the black was hiding as the cup looked "newer" when I was done spraying the clear.  Still learning and still having fun.  Below is the first coat, I'll post some pictures after I finish cut and buff.

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Looks pretty sweet to me.  A cut and buff with make it even better.  I had to do a super clean on my gun too before I did any painting and clear coating.  I still had little black specs here and there that came out of my gun from years of painting ornamental iron.  It just hides out in the gun waiting for the time you need to use it and want a job to come out nice.  Then it just has to put crud in your paint or clear.  Frustrating some times.  You may have to buff that side of the car now so it matches the nice shiny door when it's hung and done.  

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2 minutes ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Looks pretty sweet to me.  A cut and buff with make it even better.  I had to do a super clean on my gun too before I did any painting and clear coating.  I still had little black specs here and there that came out of my gun from years of painting ornamental iron.  It just hides out in the gun waiting for the time you need to use it and want a job to come out nice.  Then it just has to put crud in your paint or clear.  Frustrating some times.  You may have to buff that side of the car now so it matches the nice shiny door when it's hung and done.  

 

Thanks Martin, the first coat did turn out pretty good.  The other coats are not bad but they do have some texture.   I probably will have to buff the whole car because you're right, the door isn't going to match. This is a 1998 car and the paint isn't in the greatest of conditions.  If we have some nice weather next week (and it doesn't look like it) then I might do it then.  Otherwise the car goes back with the daughter and who knows when I might see it again. ;)
 

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Door is done!  Very happy with how it turned out.  Certainly exceeded expectations.   Biggest issues were:

 

1) Runs.  Didn't get those cut down enough either.  The "run" is gone for sure, but there are a couple of vague distortions in the area the runs were in.  Looks like it might be the panel itself, but I know that's were the runs were.

 

2) Clear removing old paint from gun.  Multiple little black specs in the clear.  I was able to sand/buff them out but if they had come out earlier in the clear coat process they wouldn't have come out.

 

3) Trash.  Paint booth should fix this.  Doesn't show now, but adds an extra step of sanding to get rid of things.

 

4) Orange peel in second/third coats.  Definitely some issue with the clear drying in the gun or the black clogging it up.  Will have to investigate this further.  Again, no problem for the final product but it does add extra work.

 

Now I need to put it on and buff the rest of the car....

 

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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A comment to the point #1 from your report: by sanding the runs, you are sanding the surrounding surface too which makes almost impossible to have a perfect flat or even surface, unless you remove everything!

#2: the spray gun should be after each use as clean as it was when new. It translate that way: 5 minutes spraying the the paint, 1/2 hour to clean the gun. This is why the rattle cans are so practical!

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On 2/17/2019 at 1:16 PM, John S. said:

I meant to say'" too bad it has to go back on the car"

I felt the same way when I got my pistons from Ross Racing Pistons. I wanted to just put them on a trophy shelf they looked so good.

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I've been putting the door back on the car for 3 days now. :(   I had a devil of a time with the door latch mechanism.  It would work correctly out of the door and mostly work in the door, but when everything was buttoned up and the handle attached... it failed to open the door.   It took me nearly 4 hours to find that part of the release mechanism the the handle used was adjustable and the bolt had wiggle its way loose so it was moving a little back and forth (in the adjustment range) instead of opening the door.  It seemed the slight additional pressure in the door caused it to slide to one limit of its adjustment.  At that limit it was too far away to have enough travel to open the door.  Each time I was taking the mechanism back out (and that procedure isn't that quick) it was sliding back to the other extreme and the would function fine. 

Once though that hurdle I thought it would be pretty much all downhill from there.  In a way... it was.  Downhill to disaster.  The window lift mechanism broke.  This mechanism broke about 2 months ago and I replaced it so it is brand new and a Mercedes replacement part.  Unfortunately one of the arms has bent so it doesn't raise evenly.  The arm is stamped out of sketchy thin sheet metal.  The old mechanism was a much heavier gauge.  I pretty steamed at this point.  I've taken the mechanism on and off 4 times and it goes on with 6 rivets so each time it means using a cold chisel to shear them off, remove, tweak, replace and new rivets.  I'm headed to the junkyard tomorrow to see if I can find an older mechanism that a POS.   The second day was spent painting the door handle because OF COURSE it had a big scratch on it that didn't show up in the pictures so I didn't know I needed it when painting the door (the car lives 30 miles away so it wasn't available for inspection before I started).  

One final note of misery, Mercedes no longer carries the pinstripe for the car.  I might find one to match but I probably will have to take the pinstripes off and then put new ones on.   Might as well buff the whole car at that time right??  Oh yeah, there's a rust spot on the right side fender so maybe I should take that off and paint it.  There's a lot of paint chips as well so maybe I'll just strip the whole car down and paint it.  The check engine light it on as well so I probably should rebuild the engine. :(  I guess since it is a 1998 it is an antique because IT SURE IS BEHAVING LIKE ONE.!!!!  Touch one thing and next thing you know it is a frame off restoration. ;) 

 

 

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Thanks guys, I thought you guys would find humor in the fact that no matter the scale, no matter the age, all these same problems keep cropping up. 

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At least old cars were built by humans not robots!

Modern cars are becoming like white goods, instead of repairing them they are thrown away and you buy a new one.

No thought is given in the design to the poor bloke who try's to repair modern cars.

Even small accident damage to modern cars seems to make them an insurance right off.

I started Jaymic in 1973 as an 'accident repair centre', since I retired, the guys that took over now only do bodywork restoration work on classic BMW's.

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