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I didn't have much luck getting a suitable piece of ash to make the replacement.  I did have a nice piece of hard maple left over from a project 15 years ago.  To get the required thickness (the piece isn't that thick but it is curved) I needed to laminate three boards.  I glued that up a couple of days ago and shot the door skin with some epoxy primer.  The curve in the lower frame member is compound but as long as you cut the outside curve first you're ok.  I made the cuts on the bandsaw and then test fit in the frame.  I used polyurethane glue this time because it is good for soaking into the older wood and dries water proof.  As a rule I don't like or use the polyurethane glue but it is certainly the correct glue for this application.  It is ridiculously strong but super messy and stains your skin. The frame finished very solid and I slid it back in the door skin, folded the edges over and nailed it down.  While I think the other door is fine, after taking this one apart and seeing the surface rust behind the wood, I'll be doing the same thing to the other door. 

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Now you can see why, when I get to building a body for the Mitchell, I'm going to be leaning heavily on Jeff for advice!

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6 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

Now you can see why, when I get to building a body for the Mitchell, I'm going to be leaning heavily on Jeff for advice!

 

Don't worry Joe, you have so much credit here at my shop, you'll never get a bill. :)

 

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As experience with the first door suggested... the other door had hidden issues.  While not as bad it does require some attention.  The plan is to cut out the bottom section on the vertical piece and replace about half of the bottom of the horizontal piece.   I glued up a little extra hard maple expecting to need more than one attempt to get the other one fixed so I have some of that on hand.   Door skin did need some attention and will benefit from getting epoxy... that will need to wait though as we've had a burst of cooler weather.  I should be able to get this done sometime next week and be ready to move on to bigger tasks by next weekend.  Didn't really do that much this weekend but it was productive.

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Didn't realize the TDs had that much wood framing. Great job on the replacement wood pieces.........obviously this is not your first rodeo with wood framing!

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Wow... a month has gone by!  I'm close to getting the house ready for summer and will be back on the MG pretty soon.   I need to replace all our shutters (we've got the real shutters that swing out from the house on hinges) and once that's done then I'll be back in the shop.

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29 minutes ago, Luv2Wrench said:

Wow... a month has gone by!  I'm close to getting the house ready for summer

I feel your pain. Still have things to get done before the real heat starts and the monsoon season.  I've come up with an idea so I can work on the car without feeling like an ant under a magnifying glass.  We may be back on our projects around the same time. ;)

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I have never thought about it before, until I read the last two posts. With our changeable weather in North Norfolk in the UK, we don't get many extremes of weather. I can work, or should that be 'play', in my garage 365 days a year.  Jeff, I hope you are back on the MG soon as I have missed reading your interesting posts.

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So another "no" update... the house work is mostly done and while I'm clear to get back on the MG... I'm now out of town for most of June.   That's the bad news, the good news is that I'm with my son as he plays in his last few big junior golf tournament before heading off to college next year.  We're having a great time and, as he the last one out of the nest, I fully realize that there will never be another time like this so I'm throughly enjoying it.   I miss the MG and I miss you guys but I'll be back in 3 weeks. :)

 

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Happy to be back!   Had a blast with my son and he's been playing really well.  So well that.... yeah, I'm going to be gone a bit more.  :) I do have the next two weeks here before we hit the road again so I'm going to try and get some work done.   As a bit of a review... I have mostly stripped things off the car down to the major bodywork.  I took both doors off to fix the wood frame inside.  I got one done before the interruption and have the wood completed for the second one.  I took some time today to hang the driver's side door and see how it fit.  I've heard horror stories on getting these doors to fit properly as it seems they were somewhat custom fit to the car.   Both the doors had some issues before I took them off so I was hoping that fixing the wood frame would fix these.  I was happy to find that the driver's side fit perfectly.   I'm not sure if I'll have the same good luck with the passenger's side door but at least I don't have to worry with this one.   I need to fit the frame into the passenger's door, shoot the skin with primer and then re-assemble.   Hopefully that's something I can get done this weekend.  The next step is to remove any major dents from the fenders and remove them so I can focus on the scuttle and the tub.  I need to patch both side of the scuttle where the windshield attaches and the tub has a bad area on the passenger's side just below the door hinges.  Some wood will need to be replaced in this area as well so the entire rear quarter panel and part of the back skin will need to be removed. 

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Glad you are back Jeff!

You need to finish this so we can get back or OLD cars.

Edited by JV Puleo
typo (see edit history)
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35 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

Glad you are back Jeff!

You need to finish this so we can get back or OLD cars.

 

Indeed, I miss the Metz more than ever now. 

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I am just pulling our leg. The MG is looking very good and, by my standards, you've gone through the job like a hot knife through butter.

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Welcome back, Jeff.  you're still way ahead of me.

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Got the door skin primed and the frame mostly ready to go back in.  Still need to fill in some of the nail holes and then it will be ready to go back in the door skin.   I think I'll work on the scuttle next.  In prep for that I'm going to get the oxy-acetylene  rig out and get some practice in.  It has literally been years since I last did any significant welding so I need the practice.  Since the last time I used the rig I've gotten the regulators rebuilt and the oxygen spring changed so I'm hopeful that I'll be able to dial the settings in better this time.  

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When I was younger and a maintenance manager for a large meat processing company here in the Boston area, I did a ton of Tig welding and could hold my own with the best of them. When I purchased my new tig welder last year I figured it wouldn’t take too long for me to be back in the saddle again. What I didn’t count on was my eyesight and how wearing glasses really sucks under a helmet. All kinds of reflections from behind my glasses plus the back of the helmet glass. I have to have the welding area totally dark behind me to see really well. At least now they auto-darkening helmets but you must have a high quality extra dark lense with Tig. No cheap harbor freight helmet when tigging. It’s a shame, when we finally have the knowledge, time, and money to play in this hobby, some of our most important faculties go on vacation!

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13 hours ago, chistech said:

What I didn’t count on was my eyesight and how wearing glasses really sucks under a helmet.

Now I can blame any bad welding I do on my glasses! Wearing glasses is a real disability, to help with looking upwards, like under dashboards, I had some upside down varifocal glasses made for me. I don't wear them often, but keep them in my toolbox for when the need arises.

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I put the frame in the skin and closed over the edges.  As I got to the lower rear corner I noticed the wood giving some as I folded the edge over.   While the frame in this area looked fine when I took it apart, the hammering over of the edges loosened it up some and I decided it needed to come out.  Fortunately I was able to get access to the area and I cut out the questionable part, created a template, cut some new wood and put it in place.  I folded the edges back over, drilled some holes in the new wood to match the old and that pretty much wrapped up getting the frame in the skin.  There is a metal strengthener that runs along the inside that needs some attention and then I'll put it in.  That will finish the door and it will be on to the scuttle.

 

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Great Job! I scarfed a piece of wood into one of my Olds doors the same way and it's solid as a rock. I used slotted screws so the repair would be period correct even though it will never be seen. Have no idea why I went to that extreme?????? Probably because I have a big supply of slotted wood screws from working on all these pre-war GM's.

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Still out of town at golf tournaments but having a great time with my son and managed to pick this vintage Leland-Grifford drill press up along with a nice bounty of other smaller stuff.  I'll be driving back up in the next week or two to pick it up.  This drill press has a sliding spindle which is a very nice feature.  Instead of having to adjust the table a lot you can move the spindle up and down.  The spindle and knee/table are also on dovetail slides so they are very rigid and the knee even has a nice acme thread to adjust the height.   Probably from around 1920 yet was still designed to run off a line-shaft.  Runs very, very smooth.  I plan to remove the guards so you can see the natural beauty of the camelback style belt drive.  Right guard houses a set of 3-step cone pulleys that allow one to change the speed.

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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