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39 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

Oddly enough, that is just about the color I plan to paint the Mitchell though I'm not all that fussy as to the exact shade as long as its very dark. Brewster Green - which is, I think, even darker is also good.

 

I Googled that color and came up with:

 

image.thumb.png.15d6007b6cacb4a980a462cc34f273f2.png

 

I wouldn't mind that color and wouldn't mind that car. :)

 

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Posted (edited)

I think that what is called Brewster Green today - maybe going back to Ford using it – is lighter than the color Brewster used. In any case, I want a very dark green which I think will go well with the polished brass of the lights etc. The chassis and wheels will be a cream color - which is what it was originally. Mitchell offered  their cars in either dark blue or a dark maroon - either of which would be satisfactory but I still like green better. The Woonsocket Body Company, the predecessor to Waterhouse (the Waterhouse brothers bought the Woonsocket company when it went bankrupt) was located about a block from my shop. I think the police station is on the site now. Another of my ideas is to make a custom body and add a "Woonsocket Body Company" plate. Did they even make bodies for cars? I don't know...they did eventually. In fact, they made some of the Ruxton bodies. Whether they did it in 1910 is another question but I suspect they would if they had a customer. It's all a bit of a spoof...like my electrical stuff that is marked "Pendleton Manufacturing Company, New London, Connecticut". That was my great-grandfather.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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So... finally, three coats of epoxy primer on the tub.  Can shoot sanding primer tomorrow.  Then block sanding.  I'm excited!!!

 

PpSBig8.jpg

 

tN26TMQ.jpg

 

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Jeff, my post "I think 46169 is nicer!?! 😀", was typed out rather 'tongue in cheek'.  I am sure that whatever shade of green you choose it will look great.

 

Excellent job with the bodywork.

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Let the primer drying long enough before you are sanding it. Even on my scales models I sanded to early; the primer can then retract a bit.

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6 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Let the primer drying long enough before you are sanding it. Even on my scales models I sanded to early; the primer can then retract a bit.

 

Yes, I will be doing that.  In addition, the primer that is on now (black) is not the one I will be sanding.  While you can sand the epoxy primer it doesn't sand well.  I'll be shooting several coats of 2K primer that will fill imperfections a bit better and is easier to sand.  It isn't a high build primer but it isn't as thin as the epoxy primer.  

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You cannot spray the 2 k primer over the epoxy without at least scuffing it off,you have to rough up the surface for the primer to stick,if your using it as a sealer you can spray it then spray you color after about an hour,if you let it set you need to sand it or you’ll have poor adhesion,    Dave

 

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Luv2Wrench, boy that MG is looking great. Real nice work. Car is going to be something. Roger is right, let the primer dry completely before sanding. Wonderful work. John

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6 hours ago, JustDave said:

You cannot spray the 2 k primer over the epoxy without at least scuffing it off,you have to rough up the surface for the primer to stick,if your using it as a sealer you can spray it then spray you color after about an hour,if you let it set you need to sand it or you’ll have poor adhesion,    Dave

 

 

SPI (Southern Polyurethanes Inc) makes a 2K primer that is compatible with their epoxy primer in that you have a 6 day window to shoot the 2K primer or, as you say, you must scuff the epoxy primer. 

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Please chk the warranty,if it peels they will find every excuse to blame you,in the end they will give you a 50 % discount for the materials to do it over,,you can do as you please but if you have a paint failure down the road you will have blow the car apart to repaint it,been there done that no fun,good luck I hope the paint comes out as good  as the  rest of your work.    Dave

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16 minutes ago, JustDave said:

Please chk the warranty,if it peels they will find every excuse to blame you,in the end they will give you a 50 % discount for the materials to do it over,,you can do as you please but if you have a paint failure down the road you will have blow the car apart to repaint it,been there done that no fun,good luck I hope the paint comes out as good  as the  rest of your work.    Dave

 

I definitely hear what you're saying.  I'm following their directions to the T.  Their epoxy primer is a different than others.

 

This epoxy does not need to be sanded if it’s primed over within 7 days. Always prime over the epoxy within 7 days. After 7 days, the epoxy should be sanded with 180 grit and recoated with epoxy for best adhesion.   When spraying a polyester type primer, always let the epoxy sit for at least 48 hours.

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Block sand, block sand, etc, etc.  I'm glad this is a small car.   I'm probably doing a little more than I need to be but I will be painting it a dark green and I would like it to be as close to perfect as possible.   I've spent this long on the project already so I might as well spend a few weeks getting it dead flat.  I have the driver's rear quarter panel where I want it to be.  The passenger's rear quarter is pretty close.  The two front quarters don't need much so I haven't really done much with them yet.  The scuttle is going to be the hardest part of the tub by far.  I've gotten a fairly good start on it.  The two ends where I had to weld patches in are done and where not a problem.  The broad arc across the top along with the transition to the two raised curves in front of the driver/passenger is where the more difficult area.  There were some subtle low and high spots that really didn't come out until I started using guide coat and a 30" block.  Nothing tricky, just time consuming.

 

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27 minutes ago, Luv2Wrench said:

I'm glad this is a small car.

I wish mine was smaller

 

27 minutes ago, Luv2Wrench said:

Nothing tricky, just time consuming.

I can relate to the time consuming thing. That's why they call it body WORK. It will all be worth it in the end. 

 

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I dropped the chrome off today to get plated.  It will take 9 weeks to get back and cost $5,000.  I wasn't prepared for that.  I know chrome is expensive but I found that borderline insane.  I am paying more for "show quality chrome" so we'll see what that looks like.  My only real alternative was to buy reproductions and the quality on those is just not that good.  Probably would've been fine for a daily driver but I've put too much work into this car to cheap out on the chrome. 

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2 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

I dropped the chrome off today to get plated.  It will take 9 weeks to get back and cost $5,000.  I wasn't prepared for that.  I know chrome is expensive but I found that borderline insane.  I am paying more for "show quality chrome" so we'll see what that looks like.  My only real alternative was to buy reproductions and the quality on those is just not that good.  Probably would've been fine for a daily driver but I've put too much work into this car to cheap out on the chrome. 

I think the price of chroming is kind of ridiculous also and they tell you it’s all in the buffing and polishing cost of labor. My neighbor is a professional polisher by trade and I watch him polish up stuff in 15 minutes on his equipment that would easily take me two hours and it would be nowhere as good. The chrome on my 32’ Olds cost twice what the car originally cost me and I can tell you the car cost in the 5 digits. My dash panel alone was $1000! After paying for the chrome I could understand why some people think we should have our heads examined!

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Posted (edited)

Block sanding has gone very well though I sanded through to bare metal multiple times in multiple places.  SPI recommended that I 80 grit the whole tub and spray another two coats of the epoxy primer, wait 18 hours and then go with 2-3 coats of the build primer.  Seemed like a good idea to me and it gave me a good chance to see some reflections in the tub and check on how things looked.  It isn't perfect yet but it is certainly on the way. 

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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On 5/21/2020 at 7:46 PM, chistech said:

I think the price of chroming is kind of ridiculous also and they tell you it’s all in the buffing and polishing cost of labor. My neighbor is a professional polisher by trade and I watch him polish up stuff in 15 minutes on his equipment that would easily take me two hours and it would be nowhere as good. The chrome on my 32’ Olds cost twice what the car originally cost me and I can tell you the car cost in the 5 digits. My dash panel alone was $1000! After paying for the chrome I could understand why some people think we should have our heads examined!

 

The price of chrome plating alone would keep me from ever trying to do a car from the era when it was popular. Despite the headaches of doing earlier cars and the unpopularity of the late teens to early 20s, the lack of chrome is a plus. I prefer earlier cars in any case but not having to deal with chrome is an added attraction.

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48 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

 

The price of chrome plating alone would keep me from ever trying to do a car from the era when it was popular. Despite the headaches of doing earlier cars and the unpopularity of the late teens to early 20s, the lack of chrome is a plus. I prefer earlier cars in any case but not having to deal with chrome is an added attraction.

I believe that the cost of chroming is one of the major factors of the rat rod phase. Just like the cost of high end paint jobs being mainly responsible for the flat or mat black craze. I’ve been told that those big old 50’s Cadillac bumpers are in the $5000 to chrome so I’m glad I’m not into those. Next car for me, Ford T! No chrome and just one color. Cheap aftermarket parts, and easy restoration! Ok, just joking, no new cars on my horizon but I have thought of recreating my family’s business 23’ T, Martin Parry bodied depot hack. I still have the hand painted side curtains. Sorry, just realized I hijacked L2Ws thread!

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On 5/23/2020 at 9:54 AM, chistech said:

I believe that the cost of chroming is one of the major factors of the rat rod phase. Just like the cost of high end paint jobs being mainly responsible for the flat or mat black craze. I’ve been told that those big old 50’s Cadillac bumpers are in the $5000 to chrome so I’m glad I’m not into those. Next car for me, Ford T! No chrome and just one color. Cheap aftermarket parts, and easy restoration! Ok, just joking, no new cars on my horizon but I have thought of recreating my family’s business 23’ T, Martin Parry bodied depot hack. I still have the hand painted side curtains. Sorry, just realized I hijacked L2Ws thread!

 

This is a reality though... I paid $4,500 for the car and I was being very generous.  I've put $18,000 into the car so far.  The only two labor tasks in that were about $1,000 for the engine work and the $5,000 for the chrome.  I bought parts off eBay and restored them when I could.  While I haven't cut any corners I certainly have made every effort to reduce costs.  Even given all of that... and not including ANY of my labor, this car will have $25,000 in it before it is done.  Again... that's not including anything for my labor.   I've enjoyed the process and I'll get some money back when I sell it, but it does make one pause when thinking about the next project.  Oh, speaking of that, the 1913 Metz has no chrome... so we're OK there. ;)

 

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20 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

 

This is a reality though... I paid $4,500 for the car and I was being very generous.  I've put $18,000 into the car so far.  The only two labor tasks in that were about $1,000 for the engine work and the $5,000 for the chrome.  I bought parts off eBay and restored them when I could.  While I haven't cut any corners I certainly have made every effort to reduce costs.  Even given all of that... and not including ANY of my labor, this car will have $25,000 in it before it is done.  Again... that's not including anything for my labor.   I've enjoyed the process and I'll get some money back when I sell it, but it does make one pause when thinking about the next project.  Oh, speaking of that, the 1913 Metz has no chrome... so we're OK there. ;)

 

That’s exactly it with doing a quality restoration even when doing most the work. It’s the journey of the restoration rather than the value of the finished product. Of course, try explaining that to the significant other. I have over $50k into my Olds, and as you know, did most the work. While the Olds is only one of 249 built, one of three currently known, and the only one restored to an as correct and high level, I believe it would be difficult for it to bring enough to even break even. It’s just an Olds and doesn’t carry the prestige of even GMs next marque, a Buick, yet there were a lot more of them. I think of my 6 wheels alone with 943 hours total in them. If I paid someone $50hr for that work it would have cost $47,150 alone! Now that’s really 😜!

    The MG is looking beautiful so when done, just sit back and enjoy as you deserve it plus you know you did it yourself.

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Posted (edited)

As I edge closer and closer to spraying color, I've made a few tweaks to my setup.  I spent a lot of time designing my air system to be able to handle water.  It has done a wonderful job but I have noticed that on the more humid days the desiccant filter at the gun is about half used up after about 15 minutes of spraying.  This isn't ideal.  I was mentioning this to a buddy of mine and he asked if I had an after cooler.  I did not and I hadn't even heard of that before.  Basically an after cooler is a big transmission cooler or a/c condenser that sits between the outlet of the pump and the inlet of the tank along with a water separator.  The idea is the hot air comes out of the pump, goes through the transmission cooler (heat exchanger) and the temperature of the air drops considerably.  As the temp drops the ability for the air to hold water falls as well so out comes the water.  The water separator (at the lowest point in the system) takes out the water and lets the cooler and dryer air go on into the tank.  The water separator has an auto drain that opens when the psi drops below 5 psi, ie; when the pump shuts off.   Apparently everyone has been doing this and I'm last to the party... but I'm here now. :)

So... I bought a big transmission cooler (Hayden 1290  24"x22"), a nice big auto drain water separator and some soft copper tubing and went to work.  It went together pretty quick and I'm glad I did it.  This should keep the water out of the tank and reduce the water the rest of my system has to deal with.  I need to add a support for the filter and get a bucket to put under it.  The proof will be when I spray next and I'll see how the desiccant holds up.

 

Kyu1qza.jpg

 

 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Jeff, would you mind pm me with the components you bought for your compressor, you are not the last to the party........that would be me!

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8 hours ago, chistech said:

Jeff, would you mind pm me with the components you bought for your compressor, you are not the last to the party........that would be me!

 

I'll put it here for posterity.  Note the Amazon links will die one day but I'm putting the part info first.  Also note that there are cheaper components available.   I don't like to waste money but I have more money than time so I went with "bigger is better" approach and spent a little more to get bigger and higher quality parts. 

 

Hayden 1290 transmission cooler.  The 1260 will work as well.  https://www.amazon.com/Hayden-Automotive-1290-Heavy-Cooler/dp/B000HE6UNK

Less expensive alternative is Derale 15300 Tube fin cooler: https://www.amazon.com/Derale-15300-Tube-Cooler-Core/dp/B004XONT3E/ref=psdc_15737301_t2_B000HE6UNK

 

Milton 1020-8  1/2" NPT Metal Filter Bowl:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001O304I0/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

1/2" ID, 5/8" OD soft copper tubing.  https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-1-2-in-I-D-x-10-ft-Type-L-Soft-Copper-Coil-Tubing-5-8-in-O-D-1-2-L-10RE/203654558

 

The Hayden 1290 has 3/4" FPT and the filter is 1/2" so my connectors were:

Union 5/8" flare to 1/2" MIP - for filter

Union 5/8" flare to 3/4" MIP - for transmission cooler. 

Short forged nuts. 5/8" flare

IMG_8026.thumb.jpg.014651d485d4944a40fff0c093a090c8.jpg

 

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More mind numbingly not fun work completed over the last 2 weeks.  I may or may not have shared here that while the car was outside it got rained on a couple of times.  Not a surprise as I knew the forecast and I made sure sensitive areas were covered.  What I didn't expect was rusty nuts and bolts on the engine and transmission.  It turns out that most, if not all, of the nuts/bolts on the engine and transmission essentially had no protective plating remaining.   I knew the chassis nuts/bolts had no plating because they were rusted when I took them off the donor car which is why I plated them.  I would have plated the others if I had known.  As such, I've been taking things back apart and plating.  The good news is that I've gotten the process nailed down pretty good.  I get pretty much prefect results though it is a little slow. 

 

The last two task on the chassis/drive train are the mysterious clutch noise and the core plugs on the engine.  I had a devil of a time with getting the pilot bushing out.  I tried packing grease in and then driving a shaft in to compress the grease and force the bearing out.  That didn't work and made a fairly large mess.  I tried making a tool to extract the bearing by grabbing it from behind but that didn't work either.  I finally had to tap the bearing and run a bolt in.  That almost failed as well because I could get the threads all the way through the bearing.  Fortunately with the 18mm bolt run all the way in, I was able to knock the bolt out and, with great relief, see the bearing on the end of the bolt as it fell to the floor. 

 

I have the engine stripped down to access the core plugs and I'll be taking those out next.  This will be the 3rd time and I'm hoping it works this time. 

 

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