Roger Zimmermann

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Roger Zimmermann last won the day on December 12 2016

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About Roger Zimmermann

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    Senior Member
  • Birthday 08/20/1945

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Switzerland
  • Interests:
    US cars, red wine, sunbathing in summer (too cold for that in winter!),Fats Domino music

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  • Biography
    I will be 65 years old this year (2010); I'm a male not married.

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  1. Roger Zimmermann

    Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

    Thanks for the link; unfortunately it's too late! From a French forum I got also other links to products I was not aware. One learn something new each day!
  2. Roger Zimmermann

    Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

    Thanks for the comments! To pontiac1953: you are not the sole person with that question. Some time ago, I took the decision that I will not do again a complete model, as it "eat" all my time. The next task (don't remember if I mention it already here: the electrical system on the Toronado model is not finished, it will be done. The electrical seat is no more functioning because the track system was not clever: it jams. I will do something similar to the Mark II as the seat in this model is working perfectly. All those improvements will be related here as I don't feel a new topic will make sense. Of course, my reports will not be so often as they used to be. After that, collecting postmarks? One part less lying around: the reveal or belt molding around the rear quarter. I don’t remember if its contour was following exactly the shape of the body; of course, after the paint process it was not. With a slight “massage”, the result was acceptable and I glued definitively with clear silicone. There are most probably stronger products for the task; the advantage here is the ease of cleaning of the excess material once it’s cured. Cyanoacrylate glue is fine but it’s etching the paint. If there is excess glue, the damages are irreversible. At the same time, I’m preparing the windshield for the installation. One element after another!
  3. Roger Zimmermann

    1952 MG TD

    In the February 2019 issue from Collectible Automobile, there is an article over 1945-49 MG TC. Not exactly your model, but the vehicles are very similar.
  4. Roger Zimmermann

    Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

    With most of the parts installed, what is still to do? Obviously, the windshield and back window must now be installed. Even with the best I could do, the windows are not a perfect fit; they must be glued to the body to have a decent fitting. The most appropriate method is with clear silicone. In case it oozes on the window, it can be removed when cured. I just have to be careful as too much silicone inside will be extremely difficult to remove. With such kind of cars, there are chromed parts associated with the windows. Before the installation, I checked the fit of the back widow molding and the one at the belt. The dip rail molding was too low; it prevented to belt molding to follow the roof’s shape. A small file shortened the drip molding on both side to allow the belt molding to go under. On the picture, the upper back window molding is temporary installed to help the fitting of the “glass”. It will be glued later. The tape will be there for 24 hours, the time for the silicone to cure.
  5. Roger Zimmermann

    Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

    Thanks Pat and John! I too hope to have health and happiness for a long, long time!
  6. Roger Zimmermann

    1961 Mercury Meteor 800 restore

    With a non-metallic paint you can do the body bit by bit. I just hope that you have enough paint for the whole body because, if you need more, you may have a small tone difference!
  7. Roger Zimmermann

    Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

    Thanks! I'm on my way up!
  8. Roger Zimmermann

    Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

    A nasty cold let me down for 10 days; fortunately, as I’m almost finished with the model, I did not care too much. When I got better, I could begin the last few hoses for the A/C. 2 are done, one still has to go. To install the one going from the compressor to the condenser, I had to remove the panel holding the hood lock. The first picture from this serie is showing the condenser before panel and grille will hide it. I imagined that the installation of this panel and grille would go in 5 minutes. Oh naïve I’m! Something was jamming: the “horns” from the lower grille molding were preventing the grill to go high enough. When the grille and panel were attached with a few bolts, the assembly pushed the front clip on one side, the hood was not closing properly…I had to remove the lower molding from the grille and see what happens: all good! When presenting the molding to the installed grille, I saw that some holes were no more aligned. I suppose that the several coats of paint are thick enough to upset the original fitting. To elongate the holes was not a big deal, that place is unseen. Once the grille and upper panel were definitively assembled with 10 bolts, I could attach the modified molding with 10 more screws. This time, the support I did long ago was very helpful: the model is not moving during the assembly and the paint well protected. With the car upside-down, it was the opportunity to install the front bumper. Fortunately, I prepared long before a tool to tighten the nuts; it was also used for the rear bumper. A last task had to be done before the car is back on its wheels: connect the parking lamps with the headlamps. As the frame and bumper supports had a good coat of paint, I was not sure it the circuit for the parking lamps would be closed; fortunately, it was! OK, the illumination is rather weak; it’s just for the show. The last picture is showing how the model is getting the current: through the filler tube…Not very spectacular, but again, it’s just for the show.
  9. Roger Zimmermann

    1952 MG TD

    Thanks for the explanation! In that mechanical school, we had such a machine, but not so old...If I remember well, it was not used frequently.
  10. Roger Zimmermann

    1961 Mercury Meteor 800 restore

    Dear Keiser, if you have some for a 59/60 Eldorado or sixty special, it's maybe time to sold them. I don't know if you saw recently the price they can fetch; it's impressive!
  11. Roger Zimmermann

    1952 MG TD

    Even if I did my apprenticeship in a mechanical school (a very long time ago), I don't understand what this monster is good for. Could somebody educate me? One is sure: I would not need this machine for my scale models!
  12. Roger Zimmermann

    Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

    Well, Nelson, my words were probably not reflecting my thinking: I know what is under this or that, but I have to study and look at older pictures how exactly this or that element is installed. One point I have often trouble: which screws are used? 0.5 or 0.6mm? Or maybe 0.7? If I was wise enough to write it down at my sketches, it's easy. Unfortunately, I too often forget that small detail (or I did a change during the construction). Something I had problems too: which is the correct assembly order? For example: I wanted to install the A/C condenser on the radiator cradle before the air deflector because I could insert the A/C lines with ease. Not good: there are 3 screws which must be installed before the condenser can be installed. And so on... Anyway, thanks for the kind words!
  13. Roger Zimmermann

    Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

    That's the problem with a "modern" vehicle, compared to one till the thirties where most mechanical aspects/features were not covered by the body. Indeed, here, with just the body and seats inside, it would do the same effect with much less hours (or years) spent. As somebody once wrote, nobody will know each detail except the one who build it. Most scale model builders do cars from the twenties or thirties, probably because the work can be seen.
  14. Roger Zimmermann

    Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

    Without the front clip, the model is looking far away from completion. To change this look dramatically, I just had to add the hood and both front fenders. To add some stability, the lower air deflector was installed. I did know that it was a tight fit around the radiator cradle and frame; this time I had to use some persuasion to get it in place. Later I understood why: on the sides, it must go under the fender construction; I managed to put it on top of that lip! I saw that when I wanted to install the screws at the flange: they were not at all aligned. Fortunately, with some more persuasion, the air deflector came out. Once correctly guided, it went in place without problem; I just had to repair the black paint which was damaged during the wrong installation process. The exhaust tubes are also installed; could I now install the grille and front bumper? No, I must first do the missing hoses for the air conditioning system. The fresh air tube for the air cleaner was done since a long time; unfortunately, it’s too short! It will not takes weeks or months to do another one; I just don’t understand why I did not it longer than necessary and cut the excess…
  15. Roger Zimmermann

    Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

    No, no! I still need them!