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Sorry Jeff, I did not realise that the dash on these cars was wrapped in vinyl. Most of the TD's were made for the USA market. There are not so many of them over here. I am not a stickler for originality, it's just a personal preference. Mike

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1 minute ago, Mike Macartney said:

Sorry Jeff, I did not realise that the dash on these cars was wrapped in vinyl. Most of the TD's were made for the USA market. There are not so many of them over here. I am not a stickler for originality, it's just a personal preference. Mike

 

Certainly not an issue Mike, all opinions are valued.  If the burl turns out to be too busy I can always make another wrapped in vinyl.  I think even if I were keeping this car I'd probably go with the burl.  When I think of an English car I'm thinking more of the Jaguar that my Dad had and, of course, it had burl everywhere. 

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Jeff, you are a bit ahead of me, and may be able to help. I am new to painting wooden framed cars.

 

It looks like some of the wood frame is exposed and visible? I was wondering how you prepped the timber before applying the primer. The body that I am re-wooding at the moment has the wooden door pillars visible when finished. Originally they were hand painted in the top-coat colour. As it is raw wood, I'm thinking I need to seal it before the primer goes on. I have some water based primer/sealer ready to go on, but am a bit concerned that the grey etch primer may not get along with the water based sealer.  Any thoughts on this? I will be painting it in what we call Acrylic Laquer over here.

 

Very nice job, by the way. But that was to be expected, after observing your mechanical work.

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6 hours ago, Bush Mechanic said:

Jeff, you are a bit ahead of me, and may be able to help. I am new to painting wooden framed cars.

 

It looks like some of the wood frame is exposed and visible? I was wondering how you prepped the timber before applying the primer. The body that I am re-wooding at the moment has the wooden door pillars visible when finished. Originally they were hand painted in the top-coat colour. As it is raw wood, I'm thinking I need to seal it before the primer goes on. I have some water based primer/sealer ready to go on, but am a bit concerned that the grey etch primer may not get along with the water based sealer.  Any thoughts on this? I will be painting it in what we call Acrylic Laquer over here.

 

Very nice job, by the way. But that was to be expected, after observing your mechanical work.

 

Thanks!  You are correct that parts of the MG TD are either made from wood or have a partial wood frame.   I think originally nothing was done to the wood and it got primer/topcoat if and when the primer/topcoat was sprayed in that area.  I believe as a results of this the wood suffered greatly causing rot for it and rust on the sheet metal that wrapped it.

 

In response to that, and being a wood worker myself, I worked with the wood the same way I would for an exterior wood project.  After assembly with a waterproof glue, I brushed on a water base sealer (MinWax has one I'm fond of).  From that point forward there was little difference between the wood and metal... each and every piece got 3 full coats of epoxy primer.  Yes.. that's overkill but wasn't that much more work.  Wood pieces then were attached to their metal pieces and the assembly, bodywork and painting of the car continued.  As such, the very least covering any piece of wood will have will be; water based sealer, 3 coats of epoxy primer and then a final coat of epoxy primer.  The epoxy primer I'm using has UV protectants and can be used as a final covering (like a single stage or clear coat). 

 

As per what wood is actually exposed, there is a panel on the back behind the gas tank along with the floorboards.  Those are marine grade plywood with sealer and epoxy primer.  The panel on the back also got base and clear.

 

For your project I would recommend also using SPI's Epoxy Primer over both the wood and metal.  This should go on after the water base grain sealer and before any other primer or fillers.  Once primers/fillers are applied and bodywork complete, then one wet coat of the epoxy primer should be applied again before proceeding with paint.  The epoxy primer forms a very effective sealer and eliminates the possibility of compatibility issues.   Here is their website https://www.southernpolyurethanes.com

I do believe their products are available in Australia but if not they will be able to recommend a similar epoxy primer.  A big advantage of working with SPI is their tech support.  In addition to their normal support line you get the owner's cell phone number and can call with questions at any time.  I will not admit to the number of times I've called Barry so far... but let's just say I felt the need to send him a few gift cards. :)

 

 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Excellent! Thank you Jeff, for that in depth reply. You have put my mind at rest. I am not familiar with SPI products, but I'm very happy with the Wattyl epoxy primer that I have used on several cars in the past. No doubt a similar product. I will go with a sanding sealer first on the door shut faces. (It's a tourer body, and no doubt will be subjected to rain at times). Then carry on as for the sheet-metal. As you mentioned, the complete wood structure will get the sealer/primer before the sheet-metal goes on.

 

It's interesting that you mention glue. So many people have told me that glue is not used in car bodies, in order to allow for flexing. But as I dismantled the remains of this body, I found that the builder, Vandenplas in Belgium, had glued almost every (and possibly every) joint. And many of them were still holding fast, after 97 years. A mixture of nails, screws and dowels were added, as the joint dictated. So I have rebuilt it in the same manner, as faithful to the original structure as I can make it. Possibly the 'no glue' dictum applied to closed car bodies, which have different twisting stresses to those of tourers. 

Thanks again,  Mick.

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Mick,

 

Yes, I too have read about the no glue dictum.  I haven't done that much research but I do know that the glues I use are flexible to an extent.  I can tell that the MG was glued and I do believe that they intended for the wood to allow the flexing, NOT the joint.   I do believe that rebuilding a wood frame using today's woodworking technique and materials will provide a frame equal to or superior to original. 

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Last time I used the paint booth which was essentially the first time I used the paint booth, I ran into a bit of a problem in that while most of the air exited out under the garage door and significant amount turned the corner, went back through the shop and then again out the fan. The white air filters I started with ended up becoming green. :)  I had always planned on fixing some sort of connection between the two walls and the garage door but at the time I couldn't really see a good solution.  This time around I added to extension "wings" to the last wall panel on each side along with an addition stub wall coming down from the ceiling and intercepting (nearly) the top of the garage door.  This effectively seals the gap.  I ran the fan for the first time this afternoon and was very pleased with the results.  The two "wings" automagically deploy when the fan comes on.   While certainly not really intended or needed... it is one less thing I have to do.  There is now enough positive pressure in the room that the door also stays shut by itself, indeed, it is somewhat difficult to open when the fan is on.   I'll need to get a bigger pulley for the drive on the fan to get it slowed down a bit.  Still too much air moving through.  Obviously that's the problem you want to have as it is certainly easier to get less than it is to get more.

 

1BS0a7m.jpg

 

oMg4kUO.jpg

 

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Got the scuttle reshot and the doors finished.  Still need to wet sand, cut and buff the doors.  After that I will most likely start on the dash. Once that is complete I should be able to get the car properly assembled sans hood and fenders.   Once complete I can drive it out and park it in the main garage and then have the whole shop area to do the fenders, hood, gas tanks and misc.   I will likely be wet sanding the tub again as I realized that my glasses were not quite strong enough and I missed some textured areas along with some scratches.  My normal reading glasses are 1.75 and my shop "detail" reading glasses are 2.25.  That's just not enough anymore.  I just picked up a pair that are 3.25 and suddenly I can see everything.  Better to find that out now than later.  In the picture below my phone has turned it a little blue.  Fortunately that is not what it looks like in person. 

 

owoQIAw.jpg

 

 

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And I thought I was having a hard time seeing.  My readers are 2.25 too.  As I was told by an older gentlemen "getting old is not for sissy's".  The car is looking great!  Can't wait to see it finished.  It's been 102 here lately and holding. I'm wanting to have some cooler weather soon.  Getting a little tired of roasting everyday since May.

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Looking great!

 

4 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

. . . Once that is complete I should be able to get the car properly assembled sans hood and fenders.   Once complete I can drive it out and park it in the main garage and then have the whole shop area to do the fenders, hood, gas tanks and misc. . .

As it is a British car, I just had to do this partial translation:

 

“. . . Once that is complete I should be able to get the car properly assembled sans bonnet and wings.   Once complete I can drive it out and park it in the main garage and then have the whole shop area to do the bonnet, wings, petrol tanks and misc. . .”

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@ply33 thanks for the translation :)   Wing is certainly more representative for what is on the front of the MG.

 

Driver's door is done.  I'm happy with how it looks and I think it is probably as close to perfect as I can get for now.   It still isn't a perfect mirror finish as there are some distortions from what looks like a low frequency wave more than orange peel.   I think it is possible this is in the base as I'm certain the clear was sanded dead flat.   The base looked great when I put it on and I don't think I could shoot it any flatter but maybe these stronger glasses will reveal more as I move on to the wings and bonnet.  

 

87IE0Fw.jpg

 

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Passenger's door was going absolutely perfect right up to the point where it became a disaster.  It seems that I just didn't get enough base on the bottom edge.  I was having some trouble getting down there to shoot and I just flat out missed a spot.  I tried to blend some base in but it wrinkled.  A trick is to shoot some clear over the area and try the base again but it still wrinkled.  Unfortunately this door will need to be sanded back down, shot in epoxy sealer, base and the clear.  It is unfortunate but that's the reality of learning on the job and having zero tolerance for mistakes.  I will continue forward with the dash, wiring harness and engine connections so I can get it fired up again and test the clutch fix.  Once I've confirmed that is working correctly then it will be floorboards and the remaining interior work.  I'll work on the door when I get around to sealer/base/clear for the fenders.

 

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