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Jaguar is in the same stable as Land Rover: owned by Tata Motors and has been since 2008. Tata is a family owned company, or used to be.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)
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Jeff, congrats on getting the car running and driving! I've been working so much lately that my time on the forum has been minimal so just saw that it's running. Car looks good just like it is --  if it were mine I'd have a hard time tearing it back down for finish cosmetics because I'd be driving the wheels off it!

 

Hope you and your family have a Merry Christmas and a safe New Years Day!

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Not much to report as I've been taking it easy and hanging with the family.  Last two days have been wonderful weather wise and I've gotten in some more test drives.   I'm going to do a deep dive into what I have, what I'm missing, what needs to be repaired, etc etc.  I'm also going to move all the parts that are either duplicates, unusable or for a different car out of the shop area.   Once I start on bodywork and taking the car back apart, I want to be able to easily track everything that comes off.  I threw the windshield on just for completeness but I think it adds a lot to the look of the car.  I think this is my favorite picture so far. 

 

Hope everyone is having a Wonderful Christmas!!

 

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Still haven't gotten back to work on the car but I have been working in the shop.   I bought a 5600W 220V heater off CL just before Christmas.  It needed a 30amp 220V circuit so I added that and got it to a roughly central point in the shop.  Since I was going to have the panel open and crawling around the attic, I decided to add another 220V and 120V to the area that is rapidly becoming the "machine shop".   Once wired and connected the heater ran great for about 10 minutes.  After futzing around with it and troubleshooting I determined it was the thermostat doing its job... just way before it was actually warm in the shop.  I took the heater apart to see if I could find anything obviously wrong (and get a part number) and it looked fine.  I then realized the thermostat is located in the bottom of the heater and effectively sealed off from the outside.  Unbelievable design flaw.  I cut a nice hole in the side so that the thermostat could actually be affected by the outside air and it has worked wonderful since.   This is a fairly common heater (ProFusion, Dr. Infrared, etc) so if you have one and have issues controlling it with the thermostat... well, now you know why.

 

Second big task was to replace my rapidly fading (pun intended) florescent shop lights with LED bulbs.   I've been putting this off for the last year but that has actually worked in my favor as LED bulbs prices have come way down.  I got a 25 pack of 4' T8 tubes for $150.  They are double end tubes so you hook up one end to hot and the other to neutral.   My units had one end running hot to one bulb and neutral to the other with the far end tied together.  I was hoping the LED tubes would work that way but they didn't.   As such, I  just bound one end to hot and the other to neutral.  It was fairly easy to cut out the ballast and then tie those wires together.  The far end that was connected together was done so with a short wire.  I needed to remove one of the tombstones and remove one end of the wire.  Getting it out was pretty simple as you just needed to stick a small gauge wire in with it and pull them both out. Then cut a new section of wire, strip it and slide it right in the tombstone.  That end would be my neutral (arbitrary but the wire was white...) and the other hot.  Got them all done tonight and the difference is incredible.  Hard to judge but it easily feels twice as bright... very close to being too bright.  From a lumens standpoint it should have been about the same but from what I've heard the fluorescents fade substantially over time and mine were old enough that the ballasts were failing.  Really glad I got this done.

 

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We put in an LED batten like that. Replaced 2x5200 lumens with one 5600 lumen LED. The difference is that the fluorescent tubes put light out all around themselves (360o), while the LEDs put it out over 180o only, i.e. downwards.

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5 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

We put in an LED batten like that. Replaced 2x5200 lumens with one 5600 lumen LED. The difference is that the fluorescent tubes put light out all around themselves (360o), while the LEDs put it out over 180o only, i.e. downwards.

 

OK, I didn't think about that but it makes total sense and explains why I felt like it was twice as bright. 

 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)

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With my LED tubes the hot and ground are on the same side of the tube. The other tombstone does nothing more than hold that end of the tube up. The ballasts had to be removed to make the tubes work. I had some older fixtures in my basement retrofitted with LED and they were "plug and play". Now you couldn't give me a florescent light tube. How nice it is to turn the lights on in the dead of winter and have light! Zeke 

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6 hours ago, zeke01 said:

With my LED tubes the hot and ground are on the same side of the tube. The other tombstone does nothing more than hold that end of the tube up. The ballasts had to be removed to make the tubes work. I had some older fixtures in my basement retrofitted with LED and they were "plug and play". Now you couldn't give me a florescent light tube. How nice it is to turn the lights on in the dead of winter and have light! Zeke 

 

Yep, the common tube is "single ended" and I've been waiting a bit for the double ended tubes to be more popular and come down in price.  It has been a couple of days now and I'm still amazed at the amount of light these guys put out.   I spent the day cleaning again because everything is noticeable and having a "hospital operation room" amount of clean white light begets having everything super clean.  I almost welcome the old days of gloomy light where you couldn't see all the flaws.  :)

 

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I've been taking a little break to get some work done on the shop and play with some of my recent machine tool acquisitions.  Last week my daughter added a new project for me as she changed lanes without making sure the lane wasn't occupied. I went to PullAPart and got a door.  PullAPart if you are not familiar, is a newer style junkyard where the inventory is refreshed daily and cars don't stay around more than 60 days or so.  The inventory is searchable online, the yards are very organized and clean.  You walk out to the car you need and take the parts off.  All parts are priced the same regardless of the make and they are priced low.  I paid $45 for the door assembly which included handle, lock, airbag, side mirror, window and window mechanism.  I had to go out there and take it off, but frankly I prefer it that way.  Taking some part off a junked car is a great way to learn how to replace the part on your nice car.  If you mess up removing the part, you can just go to the next car and try again. :)

 

The door I found is silver so I'm stripping the paint, fixing a few dents and will be painting it white later this week or next.  

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)

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Detour continues... got the paint stripped from the junkyard door.  Went bare metal with 80 grit scratches on the exterior side.  Interior side just got 80 grit scratches.   Gave it two coats of SPI Epoxy Primer.  I got the dent out to within 1/8" so I should be able to use the glazing filler to get things right.  Once that's done it will be one more coat of epoxy primer but with this coat greatly reduced and only acting as a sealer coat.  Then base coat and clear coat.  Hope to be back on the MG in a week.

 

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Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Look at it this way.  It's giving you painting practice.  

Soooo......are you going to let her drive the MG when it's all finished? :unsure:

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10 minutes ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Look at it this way.  It's giving you painting practice.  

Soooo......are you going to let her drive the MG when it's all finished? :unsure:

 

I was secretly thrilled when she had the accident.  I realized it would give me the perfect opportunity to see if I could do the paint myself to a very high level.  If this goes well I will most likely paint the MG.  I've got some ideas for converting that half of the shop to a 16x12 paint booth and I think it will work very well.   I think it will take about 2 hours to set up and take up minimal room when taken down.  I'm essentially going to hang 4'x8' cardboard panels from a permanent structure I'll install along the ceiling. ULine sells 4'x8' cardboard panels that are white on one side.  I think they're $7 a sheet and the distribution center is 10 miles north of me.   I'll use positive ventilation which reduces the cost of the fans.   I've got great lighting and I can cover the floor and top with plastic.  It would be a pain to put up and take down on a routine basis but I don't see myself needing that. 

 

And NO, she's not driving the MG when it is finished. :)

 

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I just cleaned up my garage big time. Going to inflate the paint booth inside the garage this week to see how it all fits. Seems like the shop where Gillie works is over run with work so they have no more room to paint my stuff. Will have to do it in my garage. Going to pick up another blower with more cfm than the blower that came with the booth. The supplied one works but it just works. A good description is marginal. 

You worked fast on that door. I’m starting to think I’m going to start doing more myself and will hopefully progress to doing some of the fine body work and paint work. Keep up the great work. Won’t be more than a few days and you’ll be back on the MG.

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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I suppose the MG will have a solid color, not a metallic one. you can paint one element after the other which is not possible with a metallic paint. In the Cadillac forum, somebody painted a '56 Eldorado Biarritz one panel after the other with great results.

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Applied some filler to the dent along the top and the front.  Turned out to be a bigger area than I thought.  As such a bit more primer got removed.  I felt it best to put two more coats of epoxy primer back on.  From there I could see where I need to sharpen the line at the top of the door and add a little glaze filler to fix a couple pin holes in the previous filler coat.  After two fresh coats of epoxy primer it was 220 on the DA, 320 and 400 by hand.  After that I mixed up more epoxy primer and reduced it 50% with urethane reducer.  I shot a tack and wet coats of that.  I should be able to shoot base tomorrow and hopefully clear it after that.  Very, very pleased with how the reduced coat of epoxy primer laid down.  If I can get the base and clear to lay down like that then I'll be thrilled.   

 

So... as I'm looking at this, I'm wondering if I should have used a gray or white primer.  I'm going to give SPI a call tomorrow and see what they think.

 

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Got the color on tonight.  I sure hope it gets a lot whiter when the clear goes on because it is not really close to what it should be.   Base was easy to shoot and covered well.  I ended up doing 3 coats just in case I have to sand some junk out.  I don't have a booth so there's all kind of trash that could get in there.  As it is... I really didn't see much so it will be interesting to see what it looks like when I hit it with 800 tomorrow.  I will not have time to clear tomorrow so that's scheduled for Wednesday.  I've included a close up shot to show how flat the paint is laying down.  I'm not pointing at anything in the paint, just using my finger so the camera would focus.  The finish was flat enough that it wouldn't auto-focus, so that was a great sign.  :)    I'm using Sherwin Williams ATX line of base coat, so a decent paint but nothing really special. 

 

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Looks good.  Base coats will have a satin to flat look after it flashes out. once it's sanded with 800 run over it with a tack cloth and clear it.  If you get a few things in the clear you should be able to cut and buff it out ok.  Just make sure you put enough clear on so you wont buff the clear out to the base coat. Nice even coats of clear and not real heavy ones or it will run. When I started to clear my fenders the first coat went on like a heavy over spray and wasn't very smooth. Then once it was all covered with the first coat I came back with a little heavier coat and you would see it start to lay down more and flow together. I think I did three nice coats. You have to watch it as you go. Nice even fluid motion. You're doing good so far it will come out just fine. 

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Talked to Sherwin Williams today and the bottom line is the paint is not going to work.  The color isn't going to change much with clear so it wasn't going to match.  It looked like it was either mixed wrong and/or the base itself couldn't handle that brilliant a white (Mercedes Arctic White).  As such he mixed up a new batch using their Ultra 7000 line.  Only downside to this is that it isn't compatible with the ATX base that I've already sprayed.  I could clear that, scuff it and then spray the new base or I could seal it with the epoxy and the spray the base.  A third option is to sand it back down to the epoxy primer, seal that and go from there... that's going to be my choice.  It is just a door and it is pretty flat so it will not take that much time.  I also missed a ding by the door handle so I can get that now.  We put some of the new base on a the side mirror from the car and it matches very well so I'm excited about seeing the results.  Lesson learned... have some way of checking the paint before leaving the store.  I'm learning a lot and this is fantastic practice!  

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If you have a section of the old door and take that to the paint shop they should be able to mix to the colour you require. They should have the equipment to put a machine on the panel and come up with a paint mix for the correct colour.

 

Back in the 1990's Ford had a colour called Solar Gold it had a number of variants of shade. We had the car in for an accident repair job. We had no end of problems matching the paint to repair some side damage to the car. We then realised that the car had been involved in an accident before, and the front of the car was a different shade to the rear. In the end we prepared the side of the car and mixed up two of the matching shades of Solar Gold in two sperate spray guns and blended the two shades along the side of the car using the two spray guns!

 

It is always best to spay out a sample of the paint first to see if the paint is going to match. The paint shop should be able to supply these thin metal sheets.

 

Good luck, you will get there in the end.

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5 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

If you have a section of the old door and take that to the paint shop they should be able to mix to the colour you require. They should have the equipment to put a machine on the panel and come up with a paint mix for the correct colour.

 

Back in the 1990's Ford had a colour called Solar Gold it had a number of variants of shade. We had the car in for an accident repair job. We had no end of problems matching the paint to repair some side damage to the car. We then realised that the car had been involved in an accident before, and the front of the car was a different shade to the rear. In the end we prepared the side of the car and mixed up two of the matching shades of Solar Gold in two sperate spray guns and blended the two shades along the side of the car using the two spray guns!

 

It is always best to spay out a sample of the paint first to see if the paint is going to match. The paint shop should be able to supply these thin metal sheets.

 

Good luck, you will get there in the end.

 

Agreed, I thought that would be pretty easy to do.  Unfortunately  I called some custom paint shops and they all wanted to do the painting, none would sell just the paint.   It should have been fairly simple but I think the guy made a mistake on the first mix.  No biggie, I still think I'll get it done by next week.  I'm learning a lot and having a good time!

 

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