Recommended Posts

Mustang Project makes a sequential kit for the '67 Riviera. If enough interest was made, perhaps they could come up with something for the 63/64 and 65.

http://www.mustangproject.com/ProductDisplay.aspx?ID=43ac026a-7a20-459f-bd09-266ed8355e33

Be sure to click on the little yellow button 2 to see them in action. :o

Ed

Diane has them on her 65 - Best of show winner at the ROA Meet in Colorado Springs . Aftermarket .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's generational thing:When I was a kid, everything in life was someplace else, and you got there in a car. For kids today, everything in life is still someplace else, but you get there on a screen. Cars are just less relevant to kids today and there are other forms of self expression. It's also a cultural thing: Most of the 20th century was dedicated to celebrating machines that went further and broke speed records. When was the last time you heard about anybody being celebrated for breaking a speed record? The fastest machine now is a computer and it can virtually take you anywhere. It's just the way of the future. For me, there's only one real lament worth contemplating: Historically cars offered young men a way to grow their confidence and sense of accomplishment. Guys who could change a tire, fix their car or even customize it were imbued with a sense of achievement. Pridefully picking up your date in a cool car was good for ego. Fixing it when it broke was even better. Making it personal to your tastes was creative. I worry that young men today have few ways to demonstrate their prowess to women other than bragging about their high score on Grand Theft Auto. It's a confidence thing. Are young men slowly putting themselves out of business? Do young women really need a guy who can't change a tire, can't fix anything, earn less than them and spend all day playing video games? I sound like an old fart, because I sort of am. I'm 50. I have two young daughters who like my old cars, but aren't exactly dying to pick up a wrench. When I see posts from Kaber about his son working on his Riv, my hopes are restored. PRL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I havent double checked it, but AFAIK Mustang Project does make a sequential kit for the 65.........

I've seen the video for that one and as of that time, a month ago???, the '65 unit used only two bulbs and they alternated, they weren't sequential. They looked like the lights at a railroad crossing. Actually kind of confusing.

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I havent double checked it, but AFAIK Mustang Project does make a sequential kit for the 65.........and no offense, but that 12yr old who called a Mustang a Ferrari needs to be taken behind the woodshed for a little American history 101 lesson! I hear this all the time from my friends....their kids have no interest in cars whatsoever. I think they're happy thinking they might not have to eventually buy them one, but instead of an old jalopy to fix up, they're going to want a new Prius to get them to dance class, if you get my drift.( insert obligatory"not that there's anything wrong with that" here) I don't have one of those little monsters myself, so it's up to you breeders to instill the American Dream in them before it's too late, and that includes healthy doses of Automobelia, GI vs Narzis, cowboys & indians, etc! Get on it! You're losin' em! (this editorial brought to you by Rivnik who apologizes for any offensive content)

I love it!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's generational thing:When I was a kid, everything in life was someplace else, and you got there in a car. For kids today, everything in life is still someplace else, but you get there on a screen. Cars are just less relevant to kids today and there are other forms of self expression. It's also a cultural thing: Most of the 20th century was dedicated to celebrating machines that went further and broke speed records. When was the last time you heard about anybody being celebrated for breaking a speed record? The fastest machine now is a computer and it can virtually take you anywhere. It's just the way of the future. For me, there's only one real lament worth contemplating: Historically cars offered young men a way to grow their confidence and sense of accomplishment. Guys who could change a tire, fix their car or even customize it were imbued with a sense of achievement. Pridefully picking up your date in a cool car was good for ego. Fixing it when it broke was even better. Making it personal to your tastes was creative. I worry that young men today have few ways to demonstrate their prowess to women other than bragging about their high score on Grand Theft Auto. It's a confidence thing. Are young men slowly putting themselves out of business? Do young women really need a guy who can't change a tire, can't fix anything, earn less than them and spend all day playing video games? I sound like an old fart, because I sort of am. I'm 50. I have two young daughters who like my old cars, but aren't exactly dying to pick up a wrench. When I see posts from Kaber about his son working on his Riv, my hopes are restored. PRL

I'm 50 too Pete and I feel your pain. I see a slow decay of the John Wayne macho American male persona and I find it very sad indeed...:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have thought of going to the Woodward Cruise. Usually it is the weekend that precedes the Trans Am nationals that are held here in Dayton. This year is the 30th annual show, I have been taking my Firebird there since the 3rd one. It would be hard for me to get a kitchen pass for 2 weekends in a row and spend that much money in one month. I would love to go, I hear stories at the T/A show. A lot of people go top both! Have fun if you go this year and keep your eyes peeled for an Imp!

Tim

I understand Tim the T/A show sounds like a blast as well. I told my son Scott we should really start looking for early 60's Impalas even though he cannot drive yet - legally anyways! :rolleyes: Now let's see a pic of the Firebird we are hearing so much about!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I understand Tim the T/A show sounds like a blast as well. I told my son Scott we should really start looking for early 60's Impalas even though he cannot drive yet - legally anyways! :rolleyes: Now let's see a pic of the Firebird we are hearing so much about!

Well this does fit in with the Youth movement, I bought this car when I was 17 as a beater for my Chevelle. I guess it kinda still is! LOL

image_zps02353b28.jpg

image_zps0f97ad7a.jpg

Here are some youths with a cool car, heading for spring break 1983! Thats me on the left with the Vans!

scan0001_detail_zps74369787.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I'll bite. The year is 1973, and here's my '66 Olds Delta 88, which I bought for $200. This land yacht wowed my future (and current) wife and that was 36 years ago. Feels like only 35, I tell her. (That way I get more time to spend alone in in my garage.) I bought it after my 1964 Skylark coupe (Wildcat 310 V8) was stolen for a joy ride, and stripped because the NYPD never told me it was gathering parking tickets in Brooklyn! Before that, my first car was a 1961 Comet. The Skylark felt like a Caddy by comparison.

post-56475-143142662553_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's a 16 year old taking the engine out of a '54 Olds junkyard style about 1965:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]263373[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]263374[/ATTACH] Bernie

Been there, done that! What a cool picture. I never got any pics of our destruction. Worst one I remember, a friend of mine needed a rearend and springs out of a 67 Camaro for a 39 Chevy project. We rolled a nice 67 Camaro body over to remove the rear suspension and axle. While we were up there my friend was working and fell backwards off the side. His pants hooked on the front leaf spring mount and he was dangling and twisting around off the side of the upside down Camaro, feet flailing in the air. I was laughing so hard I could hardly get him unhooked and back on top of the bottom of the car. He was not nearly as amused as I was! That Camaro would bring thousands of dollars today, it really wasn't that bad!

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The kids need to learn this stuff, especially Wowing the future wife. I took mine out in my '66 Riviera the first time and after dinner, when I turned the lights on, they rotated down and swept across the height of an apartment building next door. And she thought I was as prepared as a Boy Scout when she saw the rear seat door handles.

Get them at the right age and you can even talk them into washing your car:

post-46237-143142663266_thumb.jpg A boyfriend with a job and two cars; little did that college girl know how washing that car would lead into a lifetime of washing laundry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is an interesting thread. I guess youth is relative, but at only 33 I have been into cars since I was 5 or 6. For me it was all the influence of my father and grandfather taking me to car shows and keeping me involved in the garage. I also enjoy being around people that are older than I am. I like to try and soak up the knowledge they have accumulated and it is nice to have someone to go to that can help me when I reach the end of my rope on a project.

Now that I have my own son I like to find ways to keep him interested so that when he is old enough he can pick up the hobby if he wants. We go to shows and cruises together as often as we can. I think exposure is the best way to grow interest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes being on the younger side here too, 41, I can understand the point of the thread. There are still a few of us into older muscle and we are trying to pass on our passion to the next generation. So far my son, 7, is very interested in older cars. I make it a point to bring him to car shows, tell him which model is which and why some are very special. It's amazing how fast he is picking it up. I hope he sticks with it, we need it for our hobby's future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never understood how Ford managed to sell so many T-birds after the Riviera came out. In 64 and 65 the 40,000 unit limit hadn't been reached for the

Riviera and they were available for sale. The Riviera was 10 times better looking, with a much higher level of trim and 10 times nicer driving, yet the T-bird sold about 65-70 thousand cars each of those two years......I'm totally baffled by this. This is not even mentioning the difference in quality between a Buick and a Ford.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK Riviera People: My son, now 21, and every one of his homies couldn't care less about old cars. As a matter of fact he didn't get his license until past his 18th birthday. Talking to several of his friend's parents this seems to be a very common trend these days. mitch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OK Riviera People: My son, now 21, and every one of his homies couldn't care less about old cars. As a matter of fact he didn't get his license until past his 18th birthday. Talking to several of his friend's parents this seems to be a very common trend these days. mitch

It's unfortunate but this looks to be the trend these days. Like Pete said there is a virtual world today that didn't exist when we were kids. I personally think this new generation is missing out on a whole lot of fun, but times are changing and we have to except this fact.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
… I personally think this new generation is missing out on a whole lot of fun, but times are changing and we have to except this fact.

Our (great)grandparents probably said the same about their kids forgoing horses for those smelly, noisy automobiles. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was talking with some buddies the other night about this same thing. The world of narrow experiences that kids have today - it's all virtual. Then I mentioned something my grandmother and I were talking about before she died in 1979 at the age of 97. Grandma and I were talking about all of the modern advancements in technology that she had seen (at that time - 1979) because I knew at the time she was alive when the first automobile hit the road and the first airplane flew at Kitty Hawk, the advent of electricity, the telephone, and the indoor toilet. But she had also been alive to see the first man walk on the moon and had been exposed to the word processor that we had because I'd type letters to her rather than make her try to read my handwriting. I then asked here what she thought the "greatest innovation" of her time was and she told me "screens for the windows; no more flies in the house." I guess everything is relative.

Ed

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I took this shot while getting gas last night... I'm hoping this is a sign kids are embracing the hobby.

Sorry so late, I wanted to participate when this was first posted & it slipped thru the cracks.

I also have a young boy (11) & he is back & forth on his interest with cars. My plan is to keep pushing it on him whether he likes it or not. My house my rules right lol (is that wrong) if he doesn't like homework do we just give up, throw up our hands, turn our backs & walk away?? Not me...

When my son comes of age I am sticking to the old homage of a young mans first car should NOT be a new car (or even anything close). Hopefully by then he has grasped the concept & learned from being in the garage with me. The first Transformers movie had a scene that I could totally relate to. The kids dad bought him the old Camaro that smoked like a locomotive & the mom barked "you are so cheat" the father replied with "what? that's how its suppose to be" I agree. Maybe not something smoking that bad lol but lets buy our kids something they can learn on...

I've seen the video for that one and as of that time, a month ago???, the '65 unit used only two bulbs and they alternated, they weren't sequential. They looked like the lights at a railroad crossing. Actually kind of confusing.

X2

I'm 50 too Pete and I feel your pain. I see a slow decay of the John Wayne macho American male persona and I find it very sad indeed...:(

X2...what would John Wayne think of skinny jeans, texting & video games...no, not very macho.

Edited by RockinRiviDad (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was talking with some buddies the other night about this same thing. The world of narrow experiences that kids have today - it's all virtual. Then I mentioned something my grandmother and I were talking about before she died in 1979 at the age of 97. Grandma and I were talking about all of the modern advancements in technology that she had seen (at that time - 1979) because I knew at the time she was alive when the first automobile hit the road and the first airplane flew at Kitty Hawk, the advent of electricity, the telephone, and the indoor toilet. But she had also been alive to see the first man walk on the moon and had been exposed to the word processor that we had because I'd type letters to her rather than make her try to read my handwriting. I then asked here what she thought the "greatest innovation" of her time was and she told me "screens for the windows; no more flies in the house." I guess everything is relative.

Ed

VERY cool story!

arnulfo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being 25 I don't know if I still count as the "youth movement", but I have a growing collection of classic cars. I know my 2 year old loves cars. Anything with a motor you can't hardly keep him away from it. He's off to a good start.

post-84610-143142686284_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am intentionally reviving this old thread.

 

I wanted to share an experience I had at a Rod Run here in CA over the past weekend.  I am 38 years old and have been into cars since I was able to drive.  I've been to shows of all sorts and I used to show my car at events.  One thing I always made a point of doing was to engage the crowd.  If there was someone looking at my car, I'd ask him if I could answer any questions they might have.

 

Too many times this past weekend, I noticed that the enthusiast that brought their cars were too involved in talking among themselves or their fellow "club" members than actually taking the time to expose a potentially new audience to the car scene.  It's very unfortunate.  Perhaps they aren't trying to bring more people into the fold.  I hope that isn't the case.

 

I had a great conversation with one gentleman but only after I started the conversation.  Otherwise, he would have stayed sitting in his chair people watching.

 

So as a car guy, I feel it's my job to interact with the ones that show a great interest.  It should not be the other way around.  I know we are all unique personalities but I don't think we should let this culture fade away if we can do something about it.

 

Thank you.

Chris

Edited by first64riv
Apparently english isn't my first language... (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OTOH, a lot of guys who take their cars to shows do it to show off to the other car guys.  They couldn't care less if the crowd was there at all; it's all about them.

 

And for a less harsh perspective, people do tend to gravitate towards others who share a common interest.  In some respect, it's only normal that you'd spend more time talking to a guy who's familiar with the subject than a person who has limited or no knowledge.

Edited by KongaMan (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...