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Mark Shaw

1912 Buick Resurrection Day

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How 'bout we mock-up a tin cut-out of a Brass-Era Buick and a tow rope, pulling the tractor?

Love the look of the tractor!

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

About 20 years ago, at the HCCA National Tour in Portland Oregon, I saw a big (Model 17 ?) Buick pull two stalled cars up a hill leaving Fort Vancouver.

I would have liked a photo of that!

The Buick owner got a standing ovation at the awards banquet!

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A bit more progress with getting the engine back in the chassis. It ran good before the tear-down, so with just a little clean-up it was ready to go back in.

Now that the engine is back in place, the clutch action is restricted. So, the next challenge is to remove the coupling again and see if I can make some adjustments to get more play.

If anybody has some clutch adjustment tricks, now is a good time to share...

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I should have guessed that this is what you are working on. Get a few photos of the clutch and linkage. Is the throw out bearing badly worn? The engine looks good in the same colors that I used on Chartreuse. :D Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)

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Throw out bearing is OK. I think I have been increasing spring pressure rather than reducing it.

I'll try backing out the nut until it releases the clutch and then tighten it enough to hold while driving...

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Hi Mark,

It's a nice early Fordson by the way!

I believe it is a Model F made 1917-19. (The engine # should be stamped just to the right of the exhaust manifold)

The rear wheels are a stock item, but unique. Most Fordsons had a solid rear wheel with cleats attached rather than the cleats-on-open-rim verson your friend has. Open wheels provided more traction, but also sank deeper into the mud.

They make a unique chugging sound. Once you hear it you will never forget it.

Dwight

P.S. Your engine is pretty too!

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Thanks Dwight...

I got the clutch working OK. It's a little stiff, but it will probably work better when it breaks-in.

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Fordson??? Did someone say Fordson??? Oh yeah, I found it. Actually the Fordson F was made as late as 1927. That is not an early one as it does not have the "Ladder side radiator", or 6 spokes in the wheels. Look on the big plate ahead of the driver and you will see a list of patent dates cast in the fuel tank support. That will get you close to your year of manufacture. The highest production year was 1921. Often the serial number stamped by the manifold is rusted and only party legible if at all. The wheels are cut out for work in Muck Ground. Most likley the tractor was used in vegetable production to plow, and till, the wet ground. The Angle Iron wheel lugs were used though out the production of the American Model F. The Cleat type lugs came on the later Irish and English built Fordson model N's. I have owned 4 F's though the years. Being that there is a lot missing, it should make a great piece of yard art. Glad to see it saved at least. :cool:

Mark, glad to hear you have your clutch working. :D Dandy Dave!

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Thanks for the corrections on the model F Dave. I apologize for the misinformation.

No apologies necessary. I've been a tractor collector for more than 40 years and have owned more than my share. I've picked up on a lot of the small differences though the years and am more than glad to share the infomation when I can. Dandy Dave!

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Not much to update this weekend yet. During the week I have been working on all the brass parts. All the solid brass is now freshly plished thanks to the new buffer I got for Christmas.

I have lined up a brass plater to plate the steel shifter, shift gate, steering wheel spider & brake lever. The original plating is in poor shape and will not look good enough next to the solid brass parts.

I bought some walnut veneer plywood today to replace the firewall to match the wood steering wheel that I stripped of the remaining varnish. It was badly water stained where the finish had peeled off, so I called a woodworker buddy to get some advice on how to bring the color back. He sent me a pdf file that explained how to use oxalic acid to bleach out the water stains without bleaching the natural wood color. Wow did it ever worrk well!

Tomorrow I will take the pattern and new plywood to his place to cut out the new firewall. It sure is nice to have friends with all the right tools..!

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Mark,

I am now solving issue how to clean wood from water stains and dirt and make it fresh(er) natural look again. Would you mind to share that pdf file from your friend?

Josef

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Mark,

It's great to see the progress on the century car...heck, you could almost call it a Buick Century to confuse folks. :D

I wish I could devote that sort of time to get the '29 started, but right now the unheated garage makes it less appealing. It has been a mild winter overall for up here, but still....

I'm jealous, but looking forward to seeing more photos and video of the debutante.

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It took almost a whole day yesterday to remove the old clincher tires & break down all the wheels to remove the hubs for painting. I took the wood wheels to my local blaster to have the rims done. He uses a fine greensand media, so masking the wood was not required.

I picked them up today and they look great. That was probably the best $40 I have spent so far... Now I have to wait until it stops raining before I can take them out of my rig... Othrwise, they will rust almost instantly...

I plan to sand & seal the spokes and fellows prior to priming and painting. By the way, the redhead I sleep with didn't like the original grey color scheme, so the body, wheels, hood and fuel tank will be Burgandy Red. The fenders, radiator cowl, windshield frame, etc. will all be black.

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Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)

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I love natural wood spoke wheels, & I am not following the original dull color scheme Buick used in 1912 anyway. So, first thing this morning I stained all the wood spokes and fellows with he same stain I used on the firewall and steering wheel. Now I have to do the tedious cleaning of any paint left in the cracks of the wood where it did not take the stain. I am glad to have a few dental tools to make this a little easier. Then another staining is in order before finishing with spar varnish.

I think natural wood wheels will look good with all the brass on this car. I will paint the metal rims & hubs with the same burgandy red as the body color to tie it together...

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I started to clean up the hub bolts, but found many in very bad shape. I bought 32 new high strength carriage bolts with heavy nuts to replace them.

Since nobody makes high dome bolts anymore and the new bolts all have raised letters on the round ends, I used my semi-antique metal lathe to reduce the size of the heads to fit in the hub recess and remove the letter markings on the heads.

The two bolts on the left are what I bought to modify.

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Three local BCA members came over yesterday morning (the only dry day this week) to help me load the body on a PU. We then transported it across town to another car buddy's shop with a paint booth. After touring his car collection, we all went to lunch. After lunch I went home to prep other parts for priming and painting.

This morning I picked up some paint supplies and primed the body. This afternoon, I will finish preparing the doors & wheel hubs for priming and painting.

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Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)

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Mark, you will make it very easy for a whole bunch of guys to hate you. Where do you find all of this time?

Just kidding folks, Mark knows that.

stevo

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Stevo,

Oh don't hate me... I took the whole week off last week and still attended three conference calls, did three employee reviews, and answered all my work emails....

I spent about 5-6 hours in the shop every day last week.

Just think what I could do if I retired...!

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Like Larry the Cable guy say's "Git Er Done!" :D Your comming along quite nicely. :cool: Dandy Dave!

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