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Mark Shaw

1912 Buick Resurrection Day

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Thanks for the encouragement guys...

Last night I varnished all the wood wheels.

Tonight I varnished one side of the new walnut firewall and prepared the brake drums and the rest of the brake rods for painting tomorrow. Not much to see yet..., but stay tuned for red paint going on the body & wheel hubs this weekend.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

It is now Saturday afternoon and I just got back from about four hours of sanding the body & doors before putting the first finish coat of burgandy red on the car.

I'm sure my arms and shoulders will be complaining later... I think I will go take some pain meds now to get ahead of it...

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It is now sunday late afternoon and I finished painting the wheels, hubs, hub bolts, and sealed all the seams in the fenders. The photo of the front wheel shows the color scheme for the car.

It is interesting that the front wheels have more hub bolts than the rear wheels. I would have expected the opposite, but since the fronts wheels have the bearings in them, the hubs are much heavier.

Another dose of Ibuprofen with dinner is in order tonight.

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My cool little tire mounting tool just wasn't big enough to work on these tires. So, with lots of help from my Buick buddy Arland, we got four new clincher tires mounted today.

It took over two hours to mount the first one wrong (we forgot to put the outside ring on) but after we figured out a system using C clamps, it only took two more hours to get them all done correctly. I need a larger version of the tire tool to fix a flat on the road.

I installed the wheels on the chassis after dinner (with more ibuprofen of course). Now I have a rolling chassis ready to be married with the body so I can deliver it to the upholstry shop on time.

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Loaded this morning ready for the marriage with the body. Then, off to the upholstry shop before it rains again...

Now you can see just how small this car really is...

Late afternoon edit... With the help of two Buick buddies and my friend's fork lift, marrying the body to the frame was relatively easy. We didn't even have to unload the chassis from the trailer. The car is now at the upholstry shop.

Now to finish the gas tank, lights, firewall, etc.... Still lots to get ready before putting it in the BCA booth at the Portland Swap Meet next month!

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Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)

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Looking good, Mark.

Yes, that Vitamin I is all important to skiers and I am sure it also works wonders when wrenching for long periods on these old bodies.

John

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Mark, when that body goes on she is going to be quite the looker. Congratulations on finally getting all the "big" pieces together. Quite a job.

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I was too busy loading and unloading stuff when the body & chassis were married last week to take any photos of the two together. I took the top mounting irons to the upholstry shop at noon today, so I brought my camera to get a couple of shots with the body on the chassis. The driver side door is sitting on the frame in front of the engine and the leather I supplied is on the right front tire.

My little Buick is in good company while it gets a fresh interior. The yellow car in the rear of the shop is a Pierce Arrow Roadster! Meanwhile, I am still working evenings in my shop on the fenders, ignition switch, lights, firewall, etc.

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Say Mark, Don't get any red overspray on that yellow Pierce. It may get angry and bite. ;)

Looks like your comming right along. Sweet little red Buick! :cool: Dandy Dave!

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I still say, Mark's '12 and the Chartruse Lady in an "unoffical" drag race at Concord.

John

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I don't believe the old method of calculating HP ratings listed in my Standard Catalog of American Cars, so if we compare displacement versus weight rather than power to weight, my car should come out ahead.

1912 Model 34 = 1875 lbs with a 165 cu in engine; 11.36 lbs per cu in.

1915 Model C36 = 2795 lbs with a 221 cu in engine; 12.64 lbs per cu in.

But I think I weigh a bit more than Dandy Dave...

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Some have commented that this restoration seems to be going quickly. And some wonder when I actually work during the day. I assure you that I am still putting in my 50-60 hours of work every week. Much of it is in the early morning hours because I work with a facility in the Central Time Zone (2 hrs ahead of me out West.

However, today I hit an unexpected delay when I picked up my gas tank from the sand blaster during lunch and discovered several holes that must be sealed before I can complete everything that still needs paint.

This evening, I used solder to seal all the holes and used a rasp to file down the excess. Body filler will work to smooth out the rest of the weld depressions in the tank from when the baffles were welded in.

I also discovered that a previous owner had already used a copper penney to solder-seal a hole near the tank bottom.

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I would also use tank sealer in that tank before you ever try and put gas in it Mark. The trick to tank sealer is to let it dry a lot longer the the dirrections tell you to. When it cures properly, it will last for years. Dandy Dave!

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Mark...leave the penny for good luck....when I bought my 16 d-35 originally registered as a 1917 I found a single uncirculated 1917 penny in the seat box with lots of rodent droppings and other crap ...The penny stays with the car for good luck.

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Tom,

It is still soldered to the tank and will stay there... It is a Lincoln head cent, so it can't be that old. I couldn't make out the date...

Dave,

I picked up some POR 15 Fuel Tank Sealer and a quart of POR 15 Marine Clean from Chev's of the 40's (I'm lucky they are just a few blocks from my house). The POR 15 Sealer is the stuff they carry for alcohol fueled vehichles so it should work OK for Ethanol additives. The last time I cleaned an old gas tank was for a 29 Buick. I used a whole can of Drano drain cleaner in 2 gallons of hot water with crushed pea gravel. It worked great, but this time I will try the POR 15 Marine Clean that is recommended prior to sealing the tank.

We'll see how it goes....

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I still say, Mark's '12 and the Chartruse Lady in an "unoffical" drag race at Concord.

John

:eek:....:eek:....:eek:... I've had Chartreuse up to the Death Defying speed of 45 once. That was fast enough for me in a rear wheel brake only automobile. Dandy Dave!

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Tom,

It is still soldered to the tank and will stay there... It is a Lincoln head cent, so it can't be that old. I couldn't make out the date....

Actually, the Lincoln head cent has been in production since 1909, so it could well be an old repair.

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I was away for a week on business and checked on upholstry progress on Friday afternoon... THE HAVE NOT YET STARTED! Bummer... They plan to start tomorrow (Monday), so we will see.

I worked on the oil lamps Saturday and Sunday morning. First I polished all the brass and removed most of the dents in the top of the chimney on one of them. I used the rounded rubber handle end of a small hammer as my dolly to punch out the dents in the top as best I could. I used a sack of sugar to hit against since I do not have a shot bag. It worked reasonably well.

Saturday evening I put the first gloss black paint coat on the lamp bodies and applied the second coat sunday morning. At noon I removed all the masking tape and assembled the lamps for the photo below. Just two lamps done this weekend so far.... Geeze this is time consuming!

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Wow ! they look great Mark. We havent heard from you for a short time. I thought you were too busy making progress to report. But us working stiffs have other priorities also. I hope the trim shop makes quik work of the interior so you can make your deadline. It is still amazing the progress you have made in a short time while working full time and married also. Keep the progress reports coming, they are great inspiration to us all.

Steve Fisher

Edited by superbuick (see edit history)

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