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  2. Fluid drive shifter question

    I tend to agree with Taylormade. Some of the most impressive LSR builders on this forum are 'the Montana boys". They use fast four blocks. I would give them a shout. Ray.
  3. Pre-war? Pre-pre-war? WWI you mean?

    Original but I'm not going to go crazy. Needs a windshield so I'm having them cut modern laminate safety glass, not the originals which were just window glass. Using oak to replace the floor boards and running boards. Keeping the original wheels they are in fantastic condition. Not going to replace the cloth roof, just going to fold it back and keep it back. Nobody will know. Do you see it has a glass rear window instead of squid stomach? Or swim bladder of the squid? Yuch. Who wants that?
  4. Car Parts Lot!! 25,000+ Parts!!!

    Hello! I am currently offering a very large collection of old car parts. The price is extremely low due to the fact that I need to sell them as soon as possible. I am returning to school and no longer have the time or space for them. I have a huge variety of parts from many different manufacturers. Some of the manufacturers include, MoPar, Hudson, Delco Remy, Ford, and many more. Here is a list of a small fraction of the types of parts in the inventory; Gauges (fuel, amperes, oil), Horn caps, Hood Ornaments, Bumper Guards, Switches (many switches), Lenses (tail lights, headlights, parking lights), Bezels (tail lights, Headlights, parking lights), Gaskets, Emblems, Cylinder Heads, Cylinder Kits, Cylinder Repair Kits, Voltage Regulators, Mirrors, Horn Rings, Pedals (gas and brake), Gas Caps, Grease Caps, Handles (door, window cranks, trunk — lots of handles), Tail Light Assemblies, and much much more! ***The majority of the parts are 40s-50s (mostly used, some new). There are 25,000 of these parts. ***There is also a large collection of 7,000 NORS electrical switches. The swtiches average in the 60s and 70s. They are all in their original boxes*** ***Most of the parts have been stacked in old Coca Cola plastic crates, while others have been put on pallets. The plastic crates alone are worth $5 to $10 a piece and there are over 500 crates included in the lot. The parts are unorganized, some of the parts are labeled with markers or tags, but the majority have not yet been identified. However, the switches are organized by part number and many of them come with a list of all vehicle applications. *** Please Note *** I have organized about 20% of the inventory. The value of the inventory as a whole is nearly impossible to guess, but I have barely tapped into its potential. There are many more parts than are shown in the pictures. -Included in the lot is a large collection of antique part log books and catalog cards *~*~*~* I am sad to see it go, but changing careers and need to dedicate all of my time with that. Asking 20k Please email me at ryanjmurray17@yahoo.com --- or send a message to my AACA account
  5. Car Parts Lot!! 25,000+ Parts!!!

    Hello! I am currently offering a very large collection of old car parts. The price is extremely low due to the fact that I need to sell them as soon as possible. I am returning to school and no longer have the time or space for them. I have a huge variety of parts from many different manufacturers. Some of the manufacturers include, MoPar, Hudson, Delco Remy, Ford, and many more. Here is a list of a small fraction of the types of parts in the inventory; Gauges (fuel, amperes, oil), Horn caps, Hood Ornaments, Bumper Guards, Switches (many switches), Lenses (tail lights, headlights, parking lights), Bezels (tail lights, Headlights, parking lights), Gaskets, Emblems, Cylinder Heads, Cylinder Kits, Cylinder Repair Kits, Voltage Regulators, Mirrors, Horn Rings, Pedals (gas and brake), Gas Caps, Grease Caps, Handles (door, window cranks, trunk — lots of handles), Tail Light Assemblies, and much much more! ***The majority of the parts are 40s-50s (mostly used, some new). There are 25,000 of these parts. ***There is also a large collection of 7,000 NORS electrical switches. The swtiches average in the 60s and 70s. They are all in their original boxes*** ***Most of the parts have been stacked in old Coca Cola plastic crates, while others have been put on pallets. The plastic crates alone are worth $5 to $10 a piece and there are over 500 crates included in the lot. The parts are unorganized, some of the parts are labeled with markers or tags, but the majority have not yet been identified. However, the switches are organized by part number and many of them come with a list of all vehicle applications. *** Please Note *** I have organized about 20% of the inventory. The value of the inventory as a whole is nearly impossible to guess, but I have barely tapped into its potential. There are many more parts than are shown in the pictures. -Included in the lot is a large collection of antique part log books and catalog cards *~*~*~* I am sad to see it go, but changing careers and need to dedicate all of my time with that. Asking 20k Please email me at ryanjmurray17@yahoo.com --- or send a message to my AACA account
  6. Font wheel bearings

    Looking for front wheel bearings for my 1926 Victoria 11A The ones in there are new but never were oiled and are pitted to bad they are Gilliam 1305 and 1307 I will need new cones also. Does anyone have the cross reference for other brands? How about rear ones also?
  7. Looking For More Seat Info

    Welcome Harold
  8. Single car club decision

    I think you should drive your Ford to the Chevy function just to stir the pot. It should be entertaining. I used to be a "total Chevy man", but have become acquainted with Fords and other makes. I currently own Chevys, Fords, Crosleys and a Volkswagen (air-cooled Beetle) and like them all. I admire the engineering and construction of just about all cars, with the possible exception of the Reliant Robin. Here's a hilarious video of a Robin road test: Cheers, Grog
  9. thanks Don -- cotter pin sounds like a better idea to keep it on the pump -- will do that too. Do you know if original pumps had gaskets? would seem to go against the close specs you mentioned for the gear cover plate. tx & all best, -- ken
  10. Thanks Narve for that info I was wondering about the vacuum tank as my car didn't have one on it when I got it but I have a stack of old vacuum tanks here and thought while the engine is out getting a freshen up I may as well tidy up a few other things.There is bloke down the road here that has a Chrysler 65 and it is running a smaller style of tank as in my photo but he has told me he does run short of fuel at times so I think it is best if I fit one like your photo hopefully it will keep up the supply better . I have several original tops that I think will be fine but as I'm in Australia I know the bloke that reproduce these so no problems if they are not fit for service. As for the running boards mine are steel repo jobs that on first appearance look like a good fit but when you look below them only one bolt lines up for the brackets so they are only held on by the mud gaurds and valance panels which I'm not to happy about I think I will take them off and modify the boards so they fit properly. As for the aluminium edging and the rubber I think I will see what's available here and do bit on that issue as well. Thanks again for that info it's much appreciated
  11. 1940 buick century - possible newer year oil pump pickup?

    Originally the pickup screen and tube was held in place by a cotterpin. Plastigage the gear to cover clearance to get that as close to spec (.0005"-004) as possible
  12. Hello all, I am currently in the middle of my first significant restoration/repair effort that I have been working on and off on for about a year and a half. I am hitting a point where I am getting a little discouraged so I thought I'd join here and get some inspiration from other people's projects and maybe get some advice on things I am second-guessing on my project. My car is much less "classic" than most of the projects here and only important because of personal sentimentality so I hesitate to post it in the detailed restorations thread. It is a "driver quality" restoration. The question that is on my mind at the moment is about coating the welds I have done. Unfortunately I am questioning this a little late as I have completed several areas. On smaller projects I have used POR15 and it has held up very well, so I chose that to use in wheel well and other non-visible, non-UV exposed areas. The car is a 1987 Mercedes with monocoque body and is not going to be a concourse restoration, but I do want it to last as long as possible as my non-winter daily driver. On some areas there was light surface rust that I chose to clean up and paint with POR, but I also used the POR to coat the areas where I had cut out all rust and welded in clean metal. I was very meticulous with prep and used the zinc etcher prior to application. After POR, I applied seam sealer and then overtop all of it, 3M undercoating. Based on my experience and some recommendations of it online, I felt confident. But now after coming across some mixed opinions about POR I'm wondering if I made a poor choice and should have used an epoxy primer? At this point it would be quite difficult to remove what I have done, given all the crevices involved and access issues. For those with more experience than me (any experience!), do you think I will be safe with the coatings I have chosen and I'd be better to leave what's done done, or is adhesion going to be risked enough that I should considering trying to strip them and use a different choice of coatings. I will attach some photos of the areas in question; please forgive the beginner's quality ... I discovered well into this that I bit off more than I can chew but am doing the best I can. Three photos are of the front spring perch repairs (bare, with POR, and after seam sealer and undercoat) and three are the rear wheel well where I patched several areas of rust and replaced the subframe mount (bare, and with POR15 plus POR self-etching primer over it ... I was planning to undercoat it as well). I have since installed the full front suspension but the rear is far from finished. My next step is going to be to weld on new rocker panels/outer sills and I have questions on this as well. This is the part that will probably see the most road grit and wear, so what do you recommend I choose as coating for the underside of that? Stick with the POR process above? Or use epoxy primer? Or chassis black? I have seen people mention using all of them and it's hard for me to decide what's right. Also, the new factory panels come with a (seemingly somewhat durable) black paint on them. Obviously I will remove it in areas to be plug welded and apply weld through primer (I use Copperweld). Should I leave the factory coating on the rest of it? I was thinking I certainly would on the inside, as I won't be able to access that to paint it. As you can see in my photos, I chose to leave the factory coat on the new spring perches ... the same question applies there, as I could still topcoat it. My last question is about the inside of welds that can't be reached. Per various tips from books and internet searches, I have been painting the backs of these pieces with the weld-through primer before welding, and once the area is complete spraying cavity wax in those areas. Will his be adequate protection or should I be attempting to spray some other coating in there? My concern with the latter was that there is no way to prep the area so I could imagine very poor adhesion. Whereas the wax will creep everywhere. I already sprayed wax behind the spring perch area so I can't go back and use another coating now, but could change my approach on other areas going forward. Sorry for the long post but I would appreciate any tips and/or reassurance that will make sure my hard work is protected correctly. Thanks.
  13. thanks guys --- Will do the Bullwinkle-Rocky method on the oil pump plate & housing & replace the relief spring; I have a spare (used) correct pump I got years ago so will use the "best" spring --they all look the same; haven't done an exact measurement/comparison for precise length. Is there an advantage to use an olde hot-rod trick of stretching the relief spring for additional oil pressure? I had thought perhaps when the turkeys I had do those rings etc 15+ years ago left something out --oil relief piston & spring--since I had given them brand new oil-pump gears to install & always ask for old parts back. My oil pressure was lower than it had been before the work - down to below ca 10 to 15 psi at rev & with thick (20-50 wt oil - plus stp) In the box they gave me with my old oil-pump gears, there was an oil pump piston & spring that I hadn't given them. So I thought they might have left it out when re-installing the new oil pump gears. But the piston IS there -- except there's no hole in the bottom (i.e., all the metal filings they left (I changed oil a number of times immediately) -- resulted apparently in plugging the small oil piston hole -- looks completely solid - & of course no oil can get through. What effect would this have on the oil pressure? It's supposed to be (I think) for some oil to get through at idle, yes? When the pressure drops normally to ca 5 psi I believe - by design, yes? So a completely plugged oil relief piston would lead to Higher (?) oil pressure, yes? or? Could that have blown the floating pickup tube off the oil pump to where I found it in the bottom of the pan? And yes, I plan to plastigage at least one main bearing (the most convenient to get to -- since the engine is still in car -- & full removal etc isn't on my table at this point.) The rod bearings I know are insert -- since the guy told me they were fine when he did the rings etc. I don't yet know if the mains were upgraded from the original babbit bearings. Sorta hope they're babbit so I could tighten them a little (close the clearance gap) by removing shims (as Chiltons advises). When time, I'll pull that main cap & do the plastigage measurement -- is that what Bullwinkle would advise? Appreciate your insights on all this as I finally get back to getting my Buick running again. Should the oil pump have any gaskets? Mine didn't - nor the spare pump-- but on ebay I saw a kit which illustrates two gaskets - one on the bottom plate & another where the pump bolts to the bottom of the block. All best regards, -- ken
  14. Speedster Builds.............

    The Mercedes radiator is made up of approx 16k individually soldered tubes. The solder is on the outside, the water passes between the tubes and the air through the tubes. I know someone that made one by hand so it is very possible, just time consuming. There are a couple of companies doing it right now but the cost is something like 50k all in.
  15. BLOWER MOTORS 1955

    This worked... the motor still doesnt. It appears that the brushes and the copper contact on the commutator are just done.
  16. wtd 55-57 t bird engine

    looking for complete engine in running condition- can smoke a little-have the 3sd trans with overdrive. preferably northeast rdz69@aol.com cash or titles to trade........................................
  17. . . . if it's bare steel they'll never see it, besides, it will last long enough ! NICE RESTO job Mr. Paul - Bruce would be very proud ! Amazing what a little time and a rattle can will accomplish.
  18. Will the orphan car survive..

    I'm not so sure about that. Henry Kaiser was very well known for his success building the Liberty Ships during the war. I suspect most people associated the name with him rather the the "Old Man of Doorn".
  19. Just my opinion. You would be better off getting your originals reconditioned. The e-bay ones look to be bent & will ALSO need to be reconditioned.
  20. 1951 Oldsmobile 98 - 4 door need doors

    I have four door sedan doors. All four. Two sets remaining. Rust free. No trim or glass. Regulators and latches if needed. Dry desert climate doors. No rot collision damage or bondo. Please send me a private message if still looking. Thank you, Glenn
  21. Speedster Builds.............

    I'm jealous of your radiator! If I can't find one for my car, I'm prepared to make a "cartridge core"... but it will be a lot of work so I'd rather find a good one. Any chance you could take a closeup photograph of the plate on the battery box? I'd like to make one. I can probably copy the type or get very close. (I was a typesetter for many years). I think the wheels are have Firestone reversible rims but I confess to not being all that familiar with the differences. All 3 of the brass cars I've owned had the same wheels and rims and those are the only ones I've changed tires on except a 1-cylinder Cadillac that had clincher rims.
  22. Today
  23. I JUST LOVE THE PICTURE OF THIS BUICK...........

    That actually is/was my car. I can see the Westmoreland County Virginia county tax sticker in the window. I sold that car to a guy in Wachula, FL, who sold it to Orlando Classic Cars at a Zephyr Hills, FL auction not long after. They told me it was sold to somebody in Spain, and I never expected to see another picture of the car. This is kind of amazing. The car originally came from the Harrisburg, PA area.
  24. Speedster Builds.............

    That above picture is not awful good. Attached will be a couple that show the radiator better and also my original battery box for the Speedster running board, then a few pictures of the headlamps and shifter pieces. Al
  25. I JUST LOVE THE PICTURE OF THIS BUICK...........

    Look closely, and you can see the double whitewall tires. My Dad's car had double whitewall tires when I was very young
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