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Bringing one home from Canada


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Just curious for now, but. . . .

Say I were to fall in love and buy a US made vintage (1930s) car somewhere in Canada and wanted to bring it home. I live in the States, in New York specifically. How does one do that?

My first reaction, due to the current political climate, that buying a vintage car outside the USA and bringing it back to the USA is all but impossible anymore. Aren't there import tariffs on everything from Canada? Even old cars originally made in the USA being repatriated back to the USA?

If anyone knows the story these days, I'd appreciate hearing about it. Otherwise my thought is, if its for sale in Canada, forget about it.

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I dont believe there are any tarriffs on used cars that are already built. You should be able to bring it back in without paying extra. Probly a good idea to call a import broker and see what the real story is. You can find them pretty easy online and just call and ask. 

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29 minutes ago, cxgvd said:

You are correct, please leave our cars in Canada.  There are more cars in Florida than in all of Canada, look there.  Tongue pressed firmly into cheek,  Gary

 

 

Sad but true.  So many "mid range" price cars have been exported over the last decade. Two weeks ago one that I was seriously interested in went off to England. Not terribly expensive at $20,000.00 CDN. but still enough to make me hesitate. Fatal mistake. And probably the last one within my means in Canada.

 

Greg

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They would be doing the hobby a favour if they put 100% tariffs on antique cars from Canada. Not many new car manufactures in Canada as you can see by this link. They have only one or two plants each in Canada and some only run one shift. So no way will it effect buying a new car in the US. Mexico builds many more cars as that is where the Canadian plants were moved to over the years. https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/auto-auto.nsf/eng/am00767.html 

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1 hour ago, 1912Staver said:

 

 

Sad but true.  So many "mid range" price cars have been exported over the last decade. Two weeks ago one that I was seriously interested in went off to England. Not terribly expensive at $20,000.00 CDN. but still enough to make me hesitate. Fatal mistake. And probably the last one within my means in Canada.

 

Greg

Have you seen the 20 cars for sale at the  Rose Hansen Auction in S.E. Saskatchewan on the 15th? You might want to intercept a couple before they go south of the border.

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A few interesting offerings however it is for me  a 2500 or so mile round trip. A bit too much of an undertaking both time and cost to make on spec that a decent deal can be made. Auctions are great if a reasonable distance is involved. Canada is unfortunately a country with an abundance of unreasonable distance. Not to mention fuel prices that are substantially higher than U.S. prices. Often 20% to 25% higher.

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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>> You are correct, please leave our cars in Canada.  There are more cars in Florida than in all of Canada, look there.

 

"Our cars"? 

The car I am interested in was made in the USA and a Canadian brought it north.  All I'd like to do is bring one of our cars back home to the USA.

You should keep any Canadian-made cars in Canada.

I wish we would learn to keep any USA-made cars in the USA. So many went overseas and are practically gone forever.  Just wait until the Chinese like old cars.

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Fortunately the Chinese cant import cars more than 5 years old or they have to 100 years old. They dont want to hurt their home car industry with overseas used cars flooding the market. I would think that even a crappy 57 Chevy would feel pretty impressive compared to what the junk their building in China might be.

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Rather than speculate, the information is available right on the Customs and Border Patrol website.

 

https://www.cbp.gov/trade/basic-import-export/importing-car

 

Hagerty also has an article that details the process.

 

https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2018/02/07/how-to-import-a-car-from-canada-to-the-us

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6 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

So many "mid range" price cars have been exported over the last decade.

 

That is what happens if you don't value them highly enough! It is the same here. Cars are an international commodity.

 

Try running on the NZD,  ≈ 0.86 CAD! Many of "our" old cars have left, while many later era LHD US cars I dislike have come in. And remember that every one of those US cars have been bought on the open market with an exchange rate making them 15 to 50% dearer. Add to that the cleaning and shipping cost plus GST when they land, on the purchase cost + cleaning + shipping. GST = 15%.

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Scot12180 -

I just bought a US made 1919 Kissel in Ontario, Canada a few months ago, and then trailered it back to my home in the Detroit area. I passed thru the Port Huron Michigan Port of Entry.

- - - There are no tariffs for antique cars

- - - There is no quarantine required; you just go thru customs.

- - - You will have to fill out a simple US customs form given in the answer above. You will also have to prove you bought it with a bill of sale or a title.

- - - The only delay I experienced was that the customs officers wanted to look at the vehicle, not to check for drugs but because they are bored and are car-guys.

Very easy !!

RON HAUSMANN P.E.

 

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5 hours ago, scott12180 said:

>> You are correct, please leave our cars in Canada.  There are more cars in Florida than in all of Canada, look there.

 

"Our cars"? 

The car I am interested in was made in the USA and a Canadian brought it north.  All I'd like to do is bring one of our cars back home to the USA.

You should keep any Canadian-made cars in Canada.

I wish we would learn to keep any USA-made cars in the USA. So many went overseas and are practically gone forever.  Just wait until the Chinese like old cars.

Actually a fair number of the nicer cars sold new in Canada in the 1960's and 70's were built in the U.S. Things like GTO's and  Firebirds were comparatively small volume sellers and it was more profitable for GM to bring in U.S. produced units than set up production in Canada.  I don't believe the true Pontiac V8 engine {389, 400, 421} was ever produced in Canada however a good number were sold here.  Same with Corvette's, thousands sold here however all U.S. exports for the Canadian market. And no doubt many others.

If you are talking about a 1930's car there is a good chance it was either built here in Canada  or has been in Canada since the day it left the showroom floor. But yes some have entered Canada as used cars. 

 In any event it is very easy to buy a car in Canada and return it to the U.S.. The reverse can at times be quite complicated.

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

 

That is what happens if you don't value them highly enough! It is the same here. Cars are an international commodity.

 

Try running on the NZD,  ≈ 0.86 CAD! Many of "our" old cars have left, while many later era LHD US cars I dislike have come in. And remember that every one of those US cars have been bought on the open market with an exchange rate making them 15 to 50% dearer. Add to that the cleaning and shipping cost plus GST when they land, on the purchase cost + cleaning + shipping. GST = 15%.

 

It's not a matter of valuing them high enough, it's a matter of how much can a retired old car guy pay. It's nice not to be working, however a 40% cut in income makes a marginal situation a lot more like hopeless.

  And yes I certainly do relate to the difficulty you face in N.Z. Your hurdles are at least twice as high as we Canadians face. I would probably throw in the towel and take up sailing if I lived in N.Z. A basic small Sloop is quite inexpensive in these parts at least. And the wind is free. Mind you I spent 30 years as a Marine Engineer so the transition would be quite straightforward.

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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Fortunately the Chinese cant import cars more than 5 years old or they have to 100 years old

 

 

 

Most chinese are quite progressive and not very interested in antique cars. yes, there are exceptions............

 

China doesnt yet have a great road infrastructure and fuel is running around 12.00 a gallon. Most Chinese arent rich, less then 5% of the population.

 

avg per capita income is 9k a year, so not buying lots of our cars yet.

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51 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

Actually a fair number of the nicer cars sold new in Canada in the 1960's and 70's were built in the U.S. Things like GTO's and  Firebirds were comparatively small volume sellers and it was more profitable for GM to bring in U.S. produced units than set up production in Canada.

I think you should look into what was made in the GM Oshawa plants in the 60s and 70s. There was a B body line where many an SS Impala car was made. Also an A body line with GTO, Chevelle SS and the Canada only Beaumont SS. In my day I would tour all the GM powertrain plants monthly. The St. Catherine plant was a small plant but built many of the Corvette engines as well as the Tonawanda engine.  Oshawa also built the Chevy SS pickup in the 90s with the plant receiving more quality awards than any other GM plant. BUT they sent the truck production to Mexico anyways 10 years ago. Obviously quality does not guarantee you a job anymore.

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For the record, the NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) signed in 1993 between Canada, Mexico and USA, eliminated all inter-country tariffs on most goods moving from one country to another (with minor very specific exemptions ), and specifically, on cars. So there is virtually no issue of duty/tariff/tax wise in crossing state boundaries with vintage cars or new cars. New cars (or relatively new)however do have to meet the latest manufacturing standards existing in the importing country, for example bringing a 2 year old American made car into Canada may require importer to install daytime driving lights, or other such features legislated in Canada.

 

 

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Before NAFTA we had the Auto Pact between US and Canada. If I remember correctly the trade between the two country never changed that much when it came to North American built cars including antiques. Not sure when they did away with tariffs on old cars but before my time I would think.

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4 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

A basic small Sloop is quite inexpensive in these parts at least.

LoL. I know a couple of people who live on boats. Boy they are not cheap to run. And if you actually sail it, then they are an ongoing maintenance job.

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I just sold my 70 deVille convertible to a chap in the DC area and delivered it to RI for him.

 

A customs broker simplifies the process when it comes time to register the car as the paperwork will be correct.

 

There are no tariffs going back to the USA.  The broker has to complete and submit a US Goods Returning to US form.

 

In addition, at the border, they will want to see an import entry that the broker will prepare, a commercial invoice, DOT form HS-7 and EPA3520-21 form.  Once the car has crossed the border, CBP will check the car, complete the entry.  This triggers a form to go back to the broker for additional information, it goes back to CBP to get stamped, then goes back to the broker who sends a copy to the new owner of the vehicle.  This form is required to prove that the car entered the US legally and then can be registered.

 

Sounds worse than it actually is.

Edited by danleblanc (see edit history)
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