danleblanc

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About danleblanc

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  • Birthday 03/26/1978

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  1. Good day I'm sure I'm not the first person to have this problem. Does anyone have a trick to safely remove the black bead sealer from whitewall? There's a blob of some on one of my newly installed white walls. Thanks!
  2. So, lots of assumptions for the termination of Fantom Works. I follow them on Facebook, and, in December last year, Dan decided to call it quits. Here is his post from the Fantom Works Facebook page:
  3. I use Spray Nine to clean the tires. For dressing, I use Pinnacle Black Onyx tire gel. Doesn't get slimy and overly glossy, nor does it attact dirt. I keep dressings off of the white walls, however. Keeps them looking cleaner longer.
  4. Yes, the VIN number will be stamped at that location. The engine number will be on the LH side of the engine, at the back near the firewall on a flat area there. The engine unit number in this area will differ from the VIN. I've seem them off by a few digits because some engines were discarded at the factory if they didn't meet QC testing.
  5. I had a 61 Fleetwood that had original paint. I figured I'd buy a cover for it and cover it while in the garage. Garage was heated and air conditioned. The first time I used it for winter storage, even though the environment was climate controlled, I noticed the lacquer checking worsened. After I stopped using it for the remaining three years I had the car, the cracking never worsened. My father, a body man of 47 years said to not cover it. He was right. If it's indoors, I'd agree with Joe and the others - leave it uncovered and wash in the spring.
  6. @Rockingchairmotors Leo Look @ AN Deringer in Calais, ME. 207-454-3951
  7. I recently sold my 70 deVille convertible to a chap in DC (I'm in Canada). A broker will be your friend and make things so much easier. You'll need to complete an EPA and DOT form. The broker will also create an entry for the car in the US. This will get stamped when you cross the border which triggers another form that the broker sends to CBP to be stamped that you will need to register the car. You'll get this form in the mail from your broker. In all, actually quite easy as long as your paperwork is in order. You can't just buy it, and drive it home without a bill of sale and ownership documents, otherwise, you'll never be able to get plates for it.
  8. I got some items on my list, but not everything. I think my wants may be a bit too new (1977 Lincoln and Cadillac stuff). Stocked up on Meguiars, got brochures for my 2 77's, some Hirsch engine paint for the Cadillac, some 8 tracks for 25 cents apiece, about 6lbs of R12 for $20, renewed my AACA membership at the booth, and a few other little odds and ends. I was looking for a very nice set of tail light lenses for the 77 Fleetwood. No dice. Also looking for a good used carburetor for the 77 Lincoln (Motorcraft 4350). I found one rebuilt, but someone dropped it some time before I looked at it and messed up the linkages and choke pulloff. One guy offered me one for $10, and I said it was in worse shape than what I already have, and then asked if I would take all 6 he had for $10. I politely declined as I already have 3 that need rebuilding - I just want one that will run temporarily to test the engine after I finish reinstalling the intake.
  9. If anyone is selling or has seen someone selling Hirsch paint at Hershey, could you kindly post the space number here? I forgot to buy a program today I'm looking for a quart and a couple of aerosols.
  10. If you're in the market for a second car, seriously consider the 77-79 Cadillacs. 1977 marked the beginning of an extensive corrosion prevention program in the new downsized line. The car was designed for ease of maintenance and longevity. I've got a friend in NJ who had a 78 Coupe de Ville with over 228000 miles on it. Biggest repair was an oil pump. Still runs to this day, but was hit by a driver who ran a stop sign. They are nimble cars that do exactly what they're told all day, every day. Comfort is exceptional, and still have somewhat traditional Cadillac styling. After owning a multitude of 61/62 Cadillacs, a 70 deVille Convertible, and have driven everything from a 38 Lasalle to a 63 Eldorado, I now own a 77 Fleetwood Brougham. Would I go back to one of the others? Likely not. There are still plenty of them out there, but values are slowly appreciating on them. You can still find one for a reasonable price in decent driver quality condition for under $7500.00. Parts are easy to come by and still cheap. IMHO, you can't go wrong with one of those!
  11. It's interesting to note that the speedometer has 1.6 showing on the odometer. Logic would say that when the units were built, they were adjusted on a bench over a distance of 1 mile using some sort of calibrated device. 1mi = 1.6km It would be logical to assume that this is a metric speedometer, calibrated on equipment over a measured mile (1.6km)