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Good day all,

So, I am stewing about attending the annual Airflow meet in Independence MO this fall with my 1936 C9.  The furthest I've driven this car in any one stint is about 25mi between my home and storage;  These trips have been uneventful - hopefully this is not making me over-confident about being able to make it to the meet and back.

Considering this trip leads me to the following inquiry...

I am seeking any information that anyone might have about rear-view cameras.  I have another couple of antique cars that are even worse for a short guy (me) to see out of.  I an thinking that a rear-view camera, especially if there is a wireless type might be the ideal solution.  I am thinking something portable, maybe that I could clamp onto the license plate, with a display I could have inside the car.  Given that I have antique cars, that are all 6V and both positive and negative ground, I suspect I will need to build some type of standalone power supply / battery to have something I can move between cars without doing any permanent wiring.

If anyone on the forum has any ideas, or seen any products along these lines that look interesting, I'd appreciate a heads-up.
--
Best Regards,
Jon B Kanas
Email: kanas@qadas.com
Website: http://www.2experts.org
Longmont, Colorado; Cultural Center of the Universe

Edited by 1937 Buick 66C
I would like to make sure that I am "following" this thread. (see edit history)
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Another short guy here, Jon.  I can't offer suggestions on rear view cameras, but can tell you that I use hinge-pin mirrors that may have to be modified beyond just longer hinge pins--perhaps spreading the brackets.  Look at the Model A Ford suppliers' stainless mirrors for 1928-29 roadsters and phaetons.

 

Preparing for a long trip:  Some 20 yrs ago I "auditioned retirement" by driving my 1936 Pierce (with OD like yours) from Oakland CA to Cleveland OH, then to a Pierce meet in WI and back home over US 2.  One flat tire, speedo broke, had to disassemble carb in North Dakota. Recommendations:

 

1. Decide on spares and tools.

2. AAA card, cell phone, club roster

3. Decide what to do in case of major catastrophe.  I was mentally prepared to rent a storage unit for the car in East Nowhere, bus to closest airport, and come back with a trailer sometime later if necessary.

 

It will be a great adventure, and you'll be glad you did it!

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Jon, here are perhaps a few helps

in preparation for your long trip:

 

(1)  Gradually extend your distance by taking

a few 100-mile trips in the car this summer.

 

(2)  When you make the big jaunt, take along

a friend, or family members.  They did that in

the early days when traveling was an achievement.

If you get stuck, having someone else along may

be a help, and if all's well, you'll have someone

to talk to along the way.  Maybe even have a few

friends accompany you, so someone can follow in

a modern car.  The more people on an adventure,

the merrier!

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There are many cameras to choose from, each has some benefits over others.  I found when I installed  a Hopkins brand for my trailer hook-up, the hard wired camera worked better than the one that was wireless.  The wireless had too much interference on the screen.

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9 hours ago, Grimy said:

Another short guy here, Jon.  I can't offer suggestions on rear view cameras, but can tell you that I use hinge-pin mirrors that may have to be modified beyond just longer hinge pins--perhaps spreading the brackets.  Look at the Model A Ford suppliers' stainless mirrors for 1928-29 roadsters and phaetons.

 

Preparing for a long trip:  Some 20 yrs ago I "auditioned retirement" by driving my 1936 Pierce (with OD like yours) from Oakland CA to Cleveland OH, then to a Pierce meet in WI and back home over US 2.  One flat tire, speedo broke, had to disassemble carb in North Dakota. Recommendations:

 

1. Decide on spares and tools.

2. AAA card, cell phone, club roster

3. Decide what to do in case of major catastrophe.  I was mentally prepared to rent a storage unit for the car in East Nowhere, bus to closest airport, and come back with a trailer sometime later if necessary.

 

It will be a great adventure, and you'll be glad you did it!

Guy’s 

Grimy uses the force like Yoda to do whatever he wants. I can hear him saying, “turns in the spot it will” 

I hope to be Jedi level car guy like him one day!! 
 

What a wealth of knowledge and humble guy!! 

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Gentlemen,

 

"Turns in the spot it will" is exactly why I'm looking for a rear view camera.  One of the cars I want the camera for is a long wheel base 1936 Pierce-Arrow coupe that has no exterior mirrors and no rear quarter windows.  The term "docking" applies when moving it around in close quarters.  Since I don't have Grimy's Jedi resources, I guess I'll try an electronic solution.

 

I am thinking I will build a portable power box with a 12V AGM battery and/or 6 -> 12V inverter to power the camera.  I found a website in CA earlier today that has a wide selection, but no technical support on the weekend.  I'll give them a call on Monday and see if they can tell me what the power consumption is for a couple of their units, and what angle of view is available.  I'd like to get a nice wide angle so I can see more than one lane behind me, and for backing into the garage.

 

I got the Airflow out of storage today, and drove it 25mi home.  No issues, but upon inspection at home it will need tires and tubes, and rebuild the leaking mechanical fuel pump before a trip of any distance.  Since I'm not retired yet, this may be a bit more adventure than is prudent at this point. 

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     I plow snow with a 6 wheel John Deere " Gator "  About half of the plowing is backing up. After a couple years I bought a $42 backup camera with a 7" screen. I run it off of a smaller 12V riding mower battery all independent of the vehicle charging system. I put the charger on it every once in awhile. It will run a long time unless I leave its toggle switch on between plows. Building a " C " cab for the Gator put me in out of the weather and provided a place for the viewing screen which is also rear view mirror when the power is off.

 

     As an additional benefit I can back into the garage without looking back. Green lines extend back of the vehicle on the screen, just keep the green lines between the hazards and safely back up. I rarely back one of my old cars into the garage, but it would be a snap with the back up camera.

 

     Wireless would be nice if they work well, but once you can see what is back there are you likely to go back to not seeing by removing it? For judging maybe. It is a rear view mirror and a tiny lens, concealing the wires is the chore.

 

             Jim43   Grantham, NH

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For me, it's not so much backing up, but determining if I can move into an adjoining lane, especially to my right, while moving forward.  I'm pretty blind for that purpose in the 1934 Pierce (see photo--look carefully for the RH mirror), and the previously mentioned hinge pin mirrors do a pretty good job for me, but I do have to move around a bit in the driver's seat to check all areas.  I really should add a stick-on convex for longer trips.086.thumb.jpg.86b25752523b9fee1f3b6c0f143e06fb.jpg

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First:   Start driving it often  locally, farther each time.   Built your confidence, the car will be fine.

Second:  I know a 5'6" guy with a 33 Buick Model 57 with a wireless rearview camera which he loves.

I need to get the make and model from him to add to my 35 Buick.   I think I'll make it portable, so I can 

move it from car to car, modern and antique.   If you ever use one on a new car, you'll love them. 

Third:   The backup camera does not relieve you of the responsibility to use your mirrors.

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4 hours ago, Paul Dobbin said:

Second:  I know a 5'6" guy with a 33 Buick Model 57 with a wireless rearview camera which he loves.

I need to get the make and model from him to add to my 35 Buick.   I think I'll make it portable, so I can 

move it from car to car, modern and antique.

Paul, if/when you get that info from your friend and figure out how to make it portable, please post that info here!

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I just had a memory of a ride back in 1992 or so. I was in the passenger seat of a green Pierce-Arrow convertible coupe, sailing along at about 60 MPH and the owner took a call on his cell phone! How could life get more extreme in techie than that. The innocence of the last century.

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1 hour ago, 60FlatTop said:

just had a memory of a ride back in 1992 or so. I was in the passenger seat of a green Pierce-Arrow convertible coupe, sailing along at about 60 MPH and the owner took a call on his cell phone! How could life get more extreme in techie than that. The innocence of the last century.

Clearly our mutual friend.  He's still vertical, so he's doing something right!  I will NOT answer a cell phone call behind the wheel of one of these behmoths....

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Greetings all,

 

For 60FlatTop: If I have the rumble seat open in my Buick 66C, I cannot see anything but the passengers (or seatback) using the inside mirror.  I do have a hinge-mounted outside mirror on the left that is marginal for driving, but inadequate for parking.

 

Regarding the Airflow Shakedown (Paul Dobbin, John_S_in_Penna):  I drove the Airflow home from storage on Sunday;  The rear main seal leak is worse and the fuel pump is leaking.  The tires are ancient (pre DOT date codes);  I guess I have a growing list of spring projects. 

 

For Grimy:  An image of my Pierce-Arrow 1602 below.  Looks like a longer version (145" WB) of your 1934, with less room for passengers and worse visibility!!  I have not looked out of the inside mirror with the rumble seat open.

 

 

1936_Pierce-Arrow_LR.jpg

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On 3/6/2021 at 10:34 PM, Grimy said:

For me, it's not so much backing up, but determining if I can move into an adjoining lane, especially to my right, while moving forward.  I'm pretty blind for that purpose in the 1934 Pierce (see photo--look carefully for the RH mirror), and the previously mentioned hinge pin mirrors do a pretty good job for me, but I do have to move around a bit in the driver's seat to check all areas.  I really should add a stick-on convex for longer trips.086.thumb.jpg.86b25752523b9fee1f3b6c0f143e06fb.jpg

 

You must be using all of your Jedi senses because I've seen you go down the road in that car and you'd never know it has a massive blind spot.

I'm not a fan of the spare tire mounted mirrors on my Pierce but they sure do help when backing up and going down the road.

 

 

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