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1937 Buick 66C

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  1. Hello Leif, The problem is, most likely, that the bypass valve is allowing coolant to recirculate through the engine instead of allowing it to circulate into the radiator. Here's a link to an article I've passed out to many, many straight-8 owners to address this problem. Incidentally, there is no washer involved. Only a freeze plug with a hole in it. This link will take you to the article and related images: http://2experts.org/Vehicles/Buick/Coolant_Bypass/
  2. Hello Rock 10, Most of our regular suppliers sell one rebuild kit for all Stromberg carburetors. It will come with several gaskets; You pick the one that fits your carburetor when you reassemble it. Incidentally, there is a wonderful animated video on these carburetors you should view before you start; It is extremely helpful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2q5JshGd4nA
  3. I concur; This looks like the likely problem. When these deteriorate enough, they don't insulate well. Something as innocuous as a change in temperature can cause contact to occur. Since this is low current (only enough to trigger the relay), you may not see any evidence of arcing what would definitively identify the deteriorated insulator as the root cause.
  4. Good Morning, Although I am the owner of a LIght 8 roadster, it is not the car you are seeking. My car is #365047, but does have some ownership history in OH, and MI. Owners at that time were Kranz and Curtis before the car moved to the West coast.
  5. I decided to build a standalone power box instead of using an inverter because I have a couple of other cars that are (+) ground systems so being totally wireless is (to me) a simpler approach to maintain portability between vehicles. Also, I planned on building a pair of cup holders onto the top of the box, as I get really grumpy if I leave for an early morning car event without my coffee! I can get a small, rechargeable AGM battery that will run the monitor for 18 hours to put in the base of the box. Once the current snow melts and a visit to the local scrapyards will be mudless, I want to see if I can find a suitable console from a modern car that will lend itself as the basis for a power box. It would be nice to start with something with cupholders, lighter socket(s) and possibly a USB port already built in. If I design this properly, I could set it up such that I can charge both the power box and the camera concurrently. Maybe one of those "mobile office" boxes that Americans love to have in their pick-up trucks. I am an OK wood worker, but not nearly the quality of cabinetmaker that would be ideal for this effort.
  6. Very nice coupe. Does this model have a rumble seat?
  7. Good Afternoon all, Thanks to everyone for their comments and assistance regarding rear-view camera options. I selected a RVS Systems, model RVS-83112-BA camera system. I have done a few proof-of-concept drives with it in my S-10 pick-up and Airflow. I offer the following observations for anyone interested: · This is a wireless system, with a Bluetooth link between the monitor and camera. I have observed no interference or video quality degradation during testing. · The 3.5” LCD monitor plugs into a cigarette lighter power source. Is a color display, and shows camera battery health and Bluetooth signal strength on the monitor. · The monitor consumes 2W at 12V (0.16A), therefore I should be able to get a day’s worth of service from a small rechargeable 12V battery pack to power the monitor in the 6V cars. · The camera contains a rechargeable Li-Ion battery, therefore there is no wiring to the camera at all. I charged the camera overnight upon receipt, and after approximately 3 hours of use it still shows full charge state on the monitor. The camera has a 120 degree view. I have found that if I mount the camera as low as the license plate, the view of the traffic behind me is distorted; The relative positions of vehicles in adjacent lanes is unclear. If I mount the camera immediately below the rear window, the view of traffic behind me is much better, clearly showing traffic and lane markings for adjacent lanes. The higher mounting removes any reference point (rear bumper, etc) so when backing, left-to-right position is good, however backing depth is not easily determined. As an added bonus, because the camera is so portable, I could position the camera on my lift, watch as I approached the lift in the Airflow, easily getting it onto the lift in the exact position I wanted it, without getting in and out of the car repeatedly. Two complaints: · As with many Chinese electronics products, the owner’s manual leaves a lot to be desired. I found an undocumented button on the camera that allows the image to be rotated to allow the camera to be positioned in any vertical or horizontal position, and display a “mirror image” in each position. · When the camera is paired to the monitor, there is a flashing bright blue LED. I think this will be annoying for any night driving, so a “black tape” solution may be required.
  8. Greetings all, For 60FlatTop: If I have the rumble seat open in my Buick 66C, I cannot see anything but the passengers (or seatback) using the inside mirror. I do have a hinge-mounted outside mirror on the left that is marginal for driving, but inadequate for parking. Regarding the Airflow Shakedown (Paul Dobbin, John_S_in_Penna): I drove the Airflow home from storage on Sunday; The rear main seal leak is worse and the fuel pump is leaking. The tires are ancient (pre DOT date codes); I guess I have a growing list of spring projects. For Grimy: An image of my Pierce-Arrow 1602 below. Looks like a longer version (145" WB) of your 1934, with less room for passengers and worse visibility!! I have not looked out of the inside mirror with the rumble seat open.
  9. Gentlemen, "Turns in the spot it will" is exactly why I'm looking for a rear view camera. One of the cars I want the camera for is a long wheel base 1936 Pierce-Arrow coupe that has no exterior mirrors and no rear quarter windows. The term "docking" applies when moving it around in close quarters. Since I don't have Grimy's Jedi resources, I guess I'll try an electronic solution. I am thinking I will build a portable power box with a 12V AGM battery and/or 6 -> 12V inverter to power the camera. I found a website in CA earlier today that has a wide selection, but no technical support on the weekend. I'll give them a call on Monday and see if they can tell me what the power consumption is for a couple of their units, and what angle of view is available. I'd like to get a nice wide angle so I can see more than one lane behind me, and for backing into the garage. I got the Airflow out of storage today, and drove it 25mi home. No issues, but upon inspection at home it will need tires and tubes, and rebuild the leaking mechanical fuel pump before a trip of any distance. Since I'm not retired yet, this may be a bit more adventure than is prudent at this point.
  10. Good Day, I recently opened a thread, "Looking Backward", in the one of the general interest forums. I neglected, however, to set the "follow this thread" flag when I saved my posting. How can I flag this thread to "follow", after the fact?
  11. Good day all, So, I am stewing about attending the annual Airflow (sorry, not the Century this trip) meet in Independence MO this fall with my 1936 C9. The furthest I've driven this car in any one stint is about 25mi between my home and storage; These trips have been uneventful - hopefully this is not making me over-confident about being able to make it to the meet and back. Considering this trip leads me to the following inquiry... I am seeking any information that anyone might have about rear-view cameras. I have another couple of antique cars that are even worse for a short guy (me) to see out of. I an thinking that a rear-view camera, especially if there is a wireless type might be the ideal solution. I am thinking something portable, maybe that I could clamp onto the license plate, with a display I could have inside the car. Given that I have antique cars, that are all 6V and both positive and negative ground, I suspect I will need to build some type of standalone power supply / battery to have something I can move between cars without doing any permanent wiring. If anyone on the list has any ideas, or seen any products along these lines that look interesting, I'd appreciate a heads-up. -- Best Regards, Jon B Kanas Email: kanas@qadas.com Website: http://www.2experts.org Longmont, Colorado; Cultural Center of the Universe
  12. Good day all, So, I am stewing about attending the annual Airflow meet in Independence MO this fall with my 1936 C9. The furthest I've driven this car in any one stint is about 25mi between my home and storage; These trips have been uneventful - hopefully this is not making me over-confident about being able to make it to the meet and back. Considering this trip leads me to the following inquiry... I am seeking any information that anyone might have about rear-view cameras. I have another couple of antique cars that are even worse for a short guy (me) to see out of. I an thinking that a rear-view camera, especially if there is a wireless type might be the ideal solution. I am thinking something portable, maybe that I could clamp onto the license plate, with a display I could have inside the car. Given that I have antique cars, that are all 6V and both positive and negative ground, I suspect I will need to build some type of standalone power supply / battery to have something I can move between cars without doing any permanent wiring. If anyone on the forum has any ideas, or seen any products along these lines that look interesting, I'd appreciate a heads-up. -- Best Regards, Jon B Kanas Email: kanas@qadas.com Website: http://www.2experts.org Longmont, Colorado; Cultural Center of the Universe
  13. Greetings Edinmass et al, Thank you for your prompt and thorough response. Clearly, you have far more experience with these automobiles than I. I am confident that I can deal with removal / replacement of the thermostat. I have several antique cars, but none with thermostatically triggered radiator shutters, so this qualifies as a "new" project for me. I will assume replacement is straightforward, requiring some care with the small fasteners that secure the assembly. Fortunately, this car is in excellent condition, so I'm hoping to avoid any surprises. A couple of additional clarifications if you have time: How much coolant should I expect to need to drain so I don't have a mess on my hands when I loosen the thermostat housing. Are there any special precautions required when removing the old thermostat? You are likely to be familiar with this car. This Pierce-Arrow 1602 (#3140053) was purchased by my late father-in-law in 2012 from Ralph Schmidt from Dayton, OH. Mr. Schmidt showed the car extensively after it was fully restored in the late 1990s. The car carries First Place plaques from both CCCA and PAS. It remains in excellent condition, therefore I am rather timid about doing much to it so as to not damage anything. I'm attaching an image per your request. Unfortunately, my father-in-law did nothing with the car during his ownership, therefore my first tasks were to evacuate a tank of ancient fuel, replace an electric fuel pump whose internals had turned into goo, and rebuild the AC mechanical pump on the engine. I got it running two weeks ago, which has exposed a few additional issues I will need to resolve; The thermostat, and non-operational the charging system are the next items. I hope to be able to drive it this fall. It is my intent to drive it somewhat regularly, once I am confident that it is sorted out.
  14. Good Evening All, I have recently gotten my 1936 1602 V-12 running. Overall, it appears to be behaving as it is supposed to. I brought the engine up to 180 degrees, and observed that the radiator shutters did not open. I took the pin out of the linkage between the shutters and the thermostat lever, and manually opened the shutters (they move easily, with gentle spring return action). I then ran the engine again to nearly 200F temperature and observed that the thermostat position had not changed; It was not aligned such that the shutters would be in their open position. My experience with Pierce-Arrow is beginning with this car, and I would appreciate some advice: At what temperature should I expect the thermostat to begin to move the radiator shutters? Can the thermostat be removed from the top tank of the radiator without losing coolant? I just flushed and replenished the coolant (all 20qts worth), therefore would like to lose as little as possible. Once I have removed the thermostat, what should I expect to do with it to get it working?
  15. Good Evening Dave, Bob et al, Bob / Dave, Thank you for your quick responses. When my father-in-law acquired this car, it had a weird arrangement of cables, solenoids and relays to allow two 6V batteries to work in series to feed the starter 12V, and parallel for charging and chassis electrical. I am trying to get it back to what Pierce-Arrow intended. Now that I've been running the engine almost daily, I'm not certain that I have a real problem with the starter, although numerous other issues are making themselves known, as one would expect after a long period of disuse. I am finding that it starts immediately after the electric fuel pump primes the carbs, and two or three throttle strokes before engaging the starter. It was only the first few attempts (getting the starter working after correcting a number of misplaced cables) where I ran the starter long enough to heat the wiring. Since I had never heard it start or run before, I thought that it was cranking very slowly. Based on the noisy lifters and condition of the fuel system, I think two weeks ago was the first time the engine had been started in nearly a decade. I am out of town at the present time, so have not had an opportunity to check cranking voltage yet. I want to make certain that the starter is not drawing too much current; It having previously been fed 12V could not have been good for it. I have verified 1/0 welding cable throughout the starting circuit and grounds; That's the same gauge that I used when I restored my Buick and has been working well. Until I read your post, I did not realize the Pierce wanted 150Ah reserve; No wonder I'm seeing rapid depletion. I am using an Optima battery for the 1603 that is about 6mos old. My charger gets it up do nearly 7.0V when fully float charged, but the reserve is minimal; The charger is 15A, and has a setting for AGM batteries, so I think it's charging properly. After a couple of starts, the reserve is depleted and it takes a few hours to bring it back. This is aggravated by car not charging (I'll post about this issue separately), so it's running off of the battery alone. Optima Commentary: I used to use Optima batteries exclusively, since they did not leak in my old cars and had plenty of CCA. In the last two years, I have had 2 12V Optima batteries fail, both at around 3yrs old. Previous Optimas I owned would last 7-10 years. This is very unsatisfactory for a battery that typically costs double what I'd pay for a wet cell battery.
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