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Now that it has rear brakes it went a little further in the neighborhood and that o/d trans does not have a syncronized first gear,next step is new front wheel cylinders and hoses.

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On 6/17/2020 at 2:11 PM, 8E45E said:

Studebaker used the T86E overdrive transmission in 1965.

 

Craig

Is your 65 Cruiser a 194 or 230? My old 66 Commander was a 194 Stovebolt, 3 speed bolt action with O/D

66stude 016.jpg

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Never thought of a column mounted shift whether 3 or 4 speed anywhere near as fast as a Jeep MB or even a FIAT 1500 or even an M22 Muncie.

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3 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

Is your 65 Cruiser a 194 or 230? My old 66 Commander was a 194 Stovebolt, 3 speed bolt action with O/D

 

It is a 194, the only 6-cylinder engine available that year.  In 1966, the 230 (Super Skybolt) became available in addition to the 194.  At first, the 230 was only available with an automatic transmission, but later in the year, it was announced the 230 was also available with 3-speed standard with and without overdrive.

65crsrbldsht.jpg

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Thinking 60s Chebby 194 was a 4 cyl and 6 was a 235, then 250. Had a 250 in a rental Nova briefly. Overheated on the Interstate. Had a OHC-6 Firebird with maybe one option for a DD. Replaced the bearings on jackstands and drove to work for a few years after.

 

What is a "climatizer" ?

 

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194 was a 6 cyl as was the 230 1n the 60s. You couldn't tell them apart by just a glance.

The 4 cyl was a 153.

235s were earlier.

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
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Was thinking of the "half a 389" - Pontiac Trophy 4 engine is a 194.5 cu in (3.2 L) inline four-cylinder engine

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Did Studebakers also use Pontiac engines as they did Chevrolets?

That Skybolt sure looks Chevrolet to me and it says six right on it.

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I cant argue that.

But I do know that they used them. I was working at a classic dealership awhile back and was tasked with getting a warehouse full of cars running, some had been parked for many years.

Not being all that knowledgeable about Studebakers I was a bit surprised to see a 283 badged as a Studebaker when I popped the hood of what was probably a 60 something Lark.

So I am not surprised to see this Skybolt badge seen above.

I remember as a kid that the Studebaker V8s were pretty strong.

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On 9/25/2020 at 11:33 AM, padgett said:

Thinking 60s Chebby 194 was a 4 cyl and 6 was a 235, then 250.

 

Nope. the 235 was the last of the Stovebolt Sixes**. Last sold in 1962 in full sized Chevrolets (Biscayne, Bel Air, Impala). It started in 1929. Was a 216 for lots of its life. The 235 got pressure rods in 1954. Until then they were dipper rods! The 261* was the truck version of the 235.

 

The Chevy II came out in 1962, and Chevy needed a lightweight engine to put in it. They came out with the 194 with a lightweight block. The next year, they made it into the 230 for the full size Chevrolets. They also left off two cylinders had sold it as a 153 4 cylinder in the Chevy II from 1962 to 1970.

 

It was stroked to 250 for 1966 year.

 

No Pontiac engines in Studebakers. Back then Chevrolet and Pontiac shared no engines.

 

*Interesting, this is 4.3L, the same size as the  V-6 used for years in modern Chevrolet trucks. First in the S-10 series, then full size trucks (Silverado). I have one in my 2011, works fine for a half ton truck.

 

** The last use of the Chevrolet Stove Bolt SIx, much modified, was in Toyota Land Cruiser! Read history of Toyoda (yes spelled this way).

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8 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

The 235 got pressure rods in 1954. Until then they were dipper rods!

 

Full pressure oiling came in 1953, but only in cars with automatics. I had one of the last of the dippers, a 53 with a stick.

 

8 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

Back then Chevrolet and Pontiac shared no engines.

 

Don't bet on it. It's true in the US, but things get really weird in Canada.

 

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On 9/25/2020 at 11:13 AM, JACK M said:

So are those the years of Chevrolet engines?

194/230 sounds like Chevy IIs.

Yes available in Chevy II, Nova, Chevelle and full size cars base engine was 230

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19 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

Yes available in Chevy II, Nova, Chevelle and full size cars base engine was 230

 

 

And Studebakers... LOL

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9 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

And Checkers from 1965-on.

 

Craig

 

The SBC, The simple solution for those with not much imagination.

My grandson thinks all old Fords have SBCs in them.

Oh ! 😱 I guess most of them do,    🐏🐏

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8 minutes ago, JACK M said:

 

The SBC, The simple solution for those with not much imagination.

My grandson thinks all old Fords have SBCs in them.

Oh ! 😱 I guess most of them do,    🐏🐏

A 1967 Corvette, ISO Grifo, Bizzarini 5300 Strada GT, and an Avanti II all look entirely different, but could all have had the same 327 SBC under the hood from the factory!!

 

Craig

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Suspect more swaps have depended on what is sitting in the corner of the Garage. Right now have two Pontiac 400s (one complete, one long block) and a 3800 with 4T60.

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On 9/26/2020 at 10:12 AM, JACK M said:

Did Studebakers also use Pontiac engines as they did Chevrolets?

That Skybolt sure looks Chevrolet to me and it says six right on it.

no, studebaker didn't use pontiac engines, my good friend ivan had a 62 studebaker p.u. truck that someone had swapped in a pontiac 400 V8 and TH400 trans, that truck would run like a scaled dog, lol.

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21 hours ago, JACK M said:

The simple solution for those with not much imagination.

I'm sure these low-volume manufacturers had the imagination, but the cost of developing their own powerplant would have been prohibitive.  At least the ample availability of SBC engines allowed their dreams to become reality, and sometimes, profitable.  Not to mention, parts and service for SBC's are available almost anywhere in the world, even on Sunday, because the local parts store will likely have the part in stock and on the shelf. 

 

Do you think Nate Altman really wanted to use a SBC engine in the Avanti when he bought the rights from Studebaker? 

 

Craig

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Am sure a R4 or R5 would have been preferred but now you need heavy equipment. OTOH many such "bodied" cars (e.g. Avanti II, Custom Cloud) that were popular in the 70's were built on a Grand Prix or Monte Carlo chassis.

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11 minutes ago, padgett said:

Am sure a R4 or R5 would have been preferred but now you need heavy equipment. OTOH many such "bodied" cars (e.g. Avanti II, Custom Cloud) that were popular in the 70's were built on a Grand Prix or Monte Carlo chassis.

The Avanti used its own chassis (Studebaker) until 2001. 

 

Craig

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On 9/25/2020 at 11:33 AM, padgett said:

What is a "climatizer" ?

 

From the 1952 Studebaker Champion owner's manual....

 

Studebaker Climatizer and Defroster

The Studebaker Climatizer is a fresh air heating and ventilating system.
Fresh air passes through an air duct and then through the Climatizer
heater core. The warmed air is discharged forward and rearward from
below the front seat and spreads uniformly through the car interior.

The Climatizer heat output is thermostatically controlled so that you
may select the degree of heating desired and be assured of its remaining
constant until you reset the control. Pushing or pulling the control
regulates a thermostat which in turn controls the flow of water through
the heater coils. The further outward you pull the control, the warmer
will be the hot air output of the Climatizer.

When the engine cooling water is cold and the control is in the closed
position, the thermostat permits a full flow of water into the heat core
until the temperature at the thermostat unit (just above the accelerator
pedal) reaches approximately 70° F. (21° C.). As the water gets warmer,
the thermostat will maintain that temperature. If you desire more heat
in the car, pull the Climatizer control. After using the Climatizer a
few times you will find the position of the control that gives you the
heat in the car which best suits your comfort. Further regulation of the
control will be unnecessary.

 

 

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OFF TOPIC POSTS

Show the original poster some consideration and stick to the TOPIC.
Not only are off topic posts not germane to the original topic, they are lost to everyone else as well.

 

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3 hours ago, Peter Gariepy said:

OFF TOPIC POSTS

Show the original poster some consideration and stick to the TOPIC.
Not only are off topic posts not germane to the original topic, they are lost to everyone else as well.

 

His last post was August 24th, and while eagarly awaiting for his updates, we did mention other overdrive-equipped US cars in the meantime. 

 

I don't think its a disservice to him keeping his post near the top.

 

Craig

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