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Period RACE CAR Images to Relieve some of the Stress


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This is not an official period race car but rather a thesis project of an artist. He created the car using period parts as an art project as a static display, it is however a vehicle that is usable as is and is another example of the use of a belly tank on a race car as the body of the car. The car was for sale at the taking of this picture. That front axle don't look too safe but I've seen worse.
Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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This is one of the 1906 Locomobiles. In 1906 Locomobile built two identical race cars. In the 1908 Vanderbilt cup race this car carried the number 1 and came in second while the other car carried the number 16 and won the race.

Locomobile 1905 Race Car. The Locomobile Company of America was an ...

 

Vanderbilt Cup Races - Car Stories - Locomobile #16 (1908)

Above is the sister car, numbered 16 in the 1908 Vanderbilt cup. The other difference between the two cars is the color. One was painted white while the other car, old 16, was painted grey.

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32 minutes ago, Fossil said:

I wonder if those wooden spokes survived this abuse? The tie rod sure didn't. 

Think the tie rod is OK, it follows the dip in the front cross member. While what could be the the crank handle is held stationary by a pair of "stays" which are at awkward angles and attached to the front frame horns.

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Wood spoke wheels are a lot tougher and more resilient than most people will ever believe! About 45 years ago, I was very fortunate to be involved in one of the best ever vintage racing reenactments in the past half century.One weekend every summer for four years, a half dozen or more model T racing cars got together and put on quite a show. Over an hour in the morning, and again in the afternoon both Saturday and Sunday. Cars ranged from basic T speedsters on up to full overhead valve racing cars (I was just a kid and had one of the slowest cars). the track was an over half mile dirt track usually used for modern high power sprint cars. The track record for a modern sprint car was barely under 27 seconds! The faster model Ts were running in the 37 down to 32 seconds. When I say the "track record", that means the fastest of the fast! The fastest model Ts were running equal to many of the modern sprint cars!

The wheels used on the model Ts were about evenly split. One third steel disc wheels, one third wire wheels, and one third wooden spoke wheels. In four years, believe it or not, the wooden wheels had fewer failures than either the disc or wire wheels did! One wire wheel folded, two broke hubs, in the four years. The worst were the steel disc wheels, several broken axles and broken hubs. Wooden wheels had a couple interesting incidents. One collided with a car who's wire wheel broke. The collision caused the king pin to break and the wheel came off. The wooden wheel was not damaged. Another wooden wheel broke the steel hub (probably a defective hub?). A replacement hub had the wheel repaired and racing again a couple hours later. The only wooden wheel to actually break spokes in those four years, had collapsed the tie rod causing the front wheels to splay out and hit the wall! Damage was minor, and it was the collision with the wall that broke the wheel, not the abuse from the track.

 

Of course, all antique automobile wheels need to be inspected often, and well maintained. Wooden spoke wheels more so than wire or disc wheels. Wooden wheels are susceptible to aging, shrinkage, and splitting of the wooden spokes. A loose wooden wheel will eat itself alive if driven on more than a very small amount. However, as long as they are known to be in reasonably good condition, and tight, I love wooden wheels and have no fear of their reliability. I also check them often for any signs of developing age troubles.

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Turns out this is the Apperson Big Dick George Robertson wrapped around this pole. He and his mechanic survived with minor injuries and the car was repaired and raced again. This was the factory car though and it was plagued with bad luck.

Vanderbilt Cup Races - Blog - Mystery Foto #2 Solved: The Apperson ...

 

Here's the car after they pulled it off the pole. A little blacksmith work and it was off again.

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This is George's account of the accident.

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Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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AHa, THAT is an incredible story! And whoever wrote it wrote it very well.

It is amazing some of the wrecks that people survived. In that case, they surely were thrown out a fraction of a second before the car was hairpin bent. This is an excellent example of why I would never willingly put seat belts in my model T speedster or racing car. I would no more want seat belts in such a car than I would want to be tied onto a motorcycle!

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I notice the Cutting has a wire wheel up front, and a wood spoke wheel rear. Wish I could see the other side. Race cars often switched wheel types and size to fit track or road conditions. Occasionally, I do see a combination of wheels in racing car photos. 

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Kind of what I thought also, but I am not sure about the front wheel. The wood spoke wheel that can be easily seen is on the car behind the Cutting. The Cutting's left front is lined up almost perfectly behind the right front. I didn't look as closely as I would have liked as I don't like fooling with many of those commercial links.

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2 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 The wood spoke wheel that can be easily seen is on the car behind the Cutting. The Cutting's left front is lined up almost perfectly behind the right front. 

I see 2 further wheels beyond the wood spoke wheel.

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5 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

This photo was posted on a facebook page today. No info with it at all. Any ideas?

 

 

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This car is one of the two cars Locomobile entered into the 1908 Vanderbilt cup race with Joe Tracy behind the wheel. The picture was taken at a race camp while both cars were being race tested. Both cars carried the number 12 at this time. Despite the long hood, it is a 4 cylinder, three speed, car. I have just discovered new information on this car with a report coming soon. Stay tuned

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The only bricks left are at the start/finish line.

Winners often "kiss the bricks".

Another oddity, they don't celebrate with Champaign. They drink milk.

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