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Oil Drain Plug Gasket Material?


MochetVelo
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Or, horrors...., a nylon washer!😉

 

Ford 8 N tractors have a huge drain plug/screen gasket. Some people cut them out of the bottom of 5 gallon plastic buckets.😁

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There's good reason drain plug gaskets are firm, or no gasket and a tapered pipe thread is used instead. Soft rubber might work the first time if it on dry clean surfaces and it's not too tight. If it gets oily and you tighten it a bit too much, soft rubber gaskets have a tendency to squeeze out and leak.

 

If too loose you could lose the drain plug while driving. Guess what will be next to get lost,.....

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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Some drain plugs have built in (captive in the washer area of the bolt)  rubber gaskets.  They are on some of my GM cars:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Needa-Parts-653096-Drain-Gasket/dp/B001NYMUWI

 

That VW strainer (take out and wash, no filter) was held by six small bolts, and each bolt had a copper washer too! Anyone need a VW oil change gasket kit? I have several around here form when I was working on some for friends 30 years ago. Package has the paper gasket and the copper washers. Possibly the copper washer for the drain plug also.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am pretty sure that the 38-48 Ford V-8  car drain plug was a 1 1/2"" diameter, so you should be able to order one from the Ford suppliers and enlarge it slightly to fit your drain plug. The fiber one work, but the copper ones last longer.

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Phil, 

    This is probably too late of a response but - DO NOT use the rubber type that you started the thread with.  That is one of the worst choice that you could use which I am sure is why you started the post.  That gasket is in the too soft category.  Your drain plug is also rather large, which limits your selection some.  Approximately 1.66 ID or just over 1 5/8".  Straight copper or aluminum is pretty hard, and you run the risk of stripping threads if you tighten too much if your pan is aluminum or has a brass threaded drain hole.   I do not care for the nylon or tupperware or teflon, because it cold flows, but it may not in your case, but it is still not my first choice.   A rubber O ring is also only good if it is captured by metal around it.  If they cut a relief in your bolt or in the threaded hole, that might work, but you can not just squeeze it between the face of the threaded hole and the bolt head.  

 

Consider these choices.

 

Copper crush port gaskets. - a really good choice.  Will do some crush and not require too much torque.  These are soft copper on the outside and an asbestos type material inside.  They come in large sizes too.

 

The red fiber gaskets are a decent choice because they crush a little, but these are too small for you.  

 

You could die cut a gasket out of graphite gasket material (see McMaster Carr).  You just have to be sure that no tears are created in the process of cutting the circles.  

Hugh

 

https://restorationstuff.com/shop/#fb0=47

 

image.thumb.png.174aab055b436f944c72a3600b0ba5af.png

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I find Vulcanized Fibre works in most applications. It swells slightly when wet, making a great seal. I'm in the industrial plastics business, if anyone wants a piece to cut their own washer let me know and I might have small pieces here I can send at no charge.

 

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