Mark Kikta

1922 engine progress

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The valves can't drop into the cylinder. The combustion chamber above the cylinders is somewhat wider than the cylinder bores and the valves are slightly offset so a little of each valve overhangs the edge of the cylinder so it can't drop in.

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Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)

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I will probably pull a couple of pistons down that way myself, the compression is a little low in 2 or 3 cylinders. I have 60 in one, mid 50s in another and upper 40s in another. 3 of the cylinders below 40 which I think is not good enough. Even if the engine starts it may be rough. The lowest one is around 32, so I should drop the pan and get on that as soon as the snow melts.

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Here is a view of the combustion chamber on an '18. You can see  the relationship of edge of the bore and cages

CIMG4312.JPG

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7 hours ago, Mark Kikta said:

Your snow probably doesn’t melt until April?

 

This is what I'm dealing with and winter's only half over. The plow is stuck by the way. It's a 4x4 Ford with 31 inch mud tires and 500 pounds of weight in the back.......stuck!

 

But this happens every winter.

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Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)

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19 hours ago, Morgan Wright said:

The valves can't drop into the cylinder. The combustion chamber above the cylinders is somewhat wider than the cylinder bores and the valves are slightly offset so a little of each valve overhangs the edge of the cylinder so it can't drop in.

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I stand corrected and agree.

 

I dug out my spare 1923 cylinder jug this afternoon and looked down the valve cage bores and there is a cast feature in the combustion chamber to stop the valves from dropping into the combustion chamber.  Easy to see on the exhaust bores but it is there by about 3/8ths of an inch on the larger intake bores.

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And now I see Don's pic from below.  Nice.

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1 hour ago, Brian_Heil said:

And now I see Don's pic from below.  Nice.

 

Buick engineers thought of everything.

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If you do not know the age of the babbitt on the rod bearings, I would seriously consider getting at least the rods re-babbited.  I just had the main bearings on my truck re-babbitted because they started crumbling like an old dry cookie. 

 

I would guess that they were at least 70 years old even though when I looked at them a few years ago they looked perfect.   

 

I paid about $125/rod +- to have this work done and it is to me at least good peace of mind.

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Ok so I plan to pull the pistons out and check out the condition of the rings and at least clean them or possibly even replace them. Even though I have a 21 engine in my early 22, I believe the rings are the same.  Has anyone on this forum ever sourced replacement rings for the original pistons?

 

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I will need to find where I originally got the rings for 15 truck with original pistons which were cast iron, but I eventually put aluminum pistons and modern rings in the truck.  It will help in oil consumption and can increase you horsepower I have been told up to 10%. 

 

Also with less rotating mass it should be easier on the bearings. 

 

Ignore the comment on aluminum pistons if your car already has them.

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It will be interesting ti see what you find, pistons, tings and bores.

 

Hastings would be my go to place for the rings - if they have them. They have solved a lot of my ring  problems

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My day was not as exciting as Hugh’s day getting his body mated to the frame, but it was an exciting day for me as I pulled the old gal out of the garage with her new shoes on and pressure washed the outside of the block and trans.  Rolls much easier with these new tires than with 3 old flat tires. 

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Mark

While you have good access to the block core plugs, it would be a great time to pull them and make sure you don’t have built up crud in your block. It is likely the plugs are steel and probably ready to rust through. 

 

What is the red car hiding in the garage?

 

Jim

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Mark,

Since you are this far down with the engine, please let me make a suggestion to you.  There is a company in Massachusetts that does the 'thermal cleaning' of castings (an engine cylinder block in this case) and this would be the best money that you will ever spend on the restoration of this engine.  The rust and scale in the water jacket could very well choke your radiator core up right quick.  The photo is of the cylinder block for my 1916 D-45 after the thermal cleaning.  I am not real sure which thread on here mentioned the thermal cleaning, but, I'll bet someone on here could find it for you.  I hope this information will be of some help for you.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

PB300339.JPG

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Thanks Terry, I followed that thread and copied A lot of the of the notes exchanged.   

 

Thank you

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Today I decided to pull two of my pistons to see what condition they were in.  The first came right out with no effort and the second needed a little coaxing but not much really.  I could see the valves so next I planned to push them out.  

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The rings were all loose which surprised me.  All rings expanded and turned freely.  Pistons had a mound of carbon on the top but that came off easily with a wire wheel. Just as the parts manual says, all 4 rings look to be the same

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Edited by Mark Kikta
Text (see edit history)
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Then I pushed the valve cages out from below.  I decided to use a long brass rod that I had to punch them out.  The intake came out easily and as expected the exhaust needed more coaxing. No damage to anything.

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They look pretty good to me, But I don’t profess to know what I’m looking for.  The bore from the second piston has some smeared rust. I need to clean that off better to see.  I had run a good bit of marvel mystery oil through them to get them unstuck.  Do you suggest cleaning the bores by hand or honing them?

Edited by Mark Kikta (see edit history)

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How did you get the cage nuts off? With a drift/chisel? 

 

How thick of a brass rod did you use?

Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)

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Morgan,  to get the cage nuts off I bought a large socket and cut it to make 4 longer portions to fit the cage nuts and crank them off.  I put the socket on each cage nut, tapped it on the top with a hammer and then cranked them off.  Some were h!rger than others but it worked pretty well.

 

The brass rod I have is about 1/2  or more diameter and about 2 ft long.

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