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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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Roger; I have been subscribed to this thread for well over a year with total amazement. The video puts a lot more into perspective with your hand showing the moving seats and windows. Amazing craftsmanship. Thanks for sharing this journey.

 

Alex D.

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Roger,
I too have been following your thread for years.  The addition of the video makes your work all the more incredible.  Thank you for taking the time to show the world your amazing work and I look forward to more videos in the future!

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Thanks to all for the positive comments.

To John: The "walk around" will not happen soon: right now, I'm trying to create the window's switches. Once the first prototype is ready, all the body parts will be removed, the body separated from the frame. Why? I have to continue the inside panels. For that, I must have more freedom and not moving 2.5 kg of brass!

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On July 14, 2016 at 8:20 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Some here asked for a short film. I tried this afternoon; here is the result: https://youtu.be/bZve6r3RwuU 

Be indulgent, it's the first time I'm doing something like that!

 

 

Oh.

My.

Goodness.

 

Pics are 1 thing, this video ... takes it all to a whole new level of awesomeness.  So cool to see the moving parts like that.  Thank you, Roger!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

2-DAY EVENT ;) S Elgin IL, with restaurant & hotel discounts:
http://www.oldcarsstronghearts.com/2016/07/12/tuesday-trip-69/

"You can't see what those shades of gray keep covered" __ Jamey Johnson __ 'In Color'

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John, since a few days I'm scratching my head how to do those switches. I did the same job on the Toronado years ago; I have absolutely no clue how I did that. Removing them is too complex (I tried, all the wires are soft soldered) to see what I did 35 years ago and I have only a few sketches from that time. You may imagine that it's beyond my abilities to develop a tiny human!

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Roger,

 

Still following along and will be here in the background until you finish. I too went out and viewed your video and it was amazing to watch. I also want to pass along that this is the first video that I'd taken the time to watch in at least 3 to 4 years and well worth it. Scott...

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Thanks Keith and Scott! It's an honor for me that you watched my small video!

 

My memory is really no more what it was once: fortunately, I found sketches about the Toronado’s switches, but I was not sure if they were finally used to do them. So, I remove the arm rest from that model to get at the master switch. I could not take it out, as all the wires were soft soldered to it and protected by a daub of silicone. At least, I was able to determine that the drawing for the lever was indeed actual. But, how did I manufacture the contacts? As I could not pursue the work I did more than 30 years ago, I had to go back to the paper and pencil, hoping for THE idea. For days, nothing came. In between, I got a splendid idea how to simplify the switches by using two batteries instead of one and a common wire at the contact point from both batteries. This would have been a tremendous simplification but had other disadvantages.

Finally, I saw the end of the tunnel with a possible solution. I began the obvious part, the lever which is at the right of the coin at the third picture. Then, obviously, I had to use some isolating material; I still had some material made with resin and pressed paper (a souvenir from my apprenticeship many decades ago), I milled that tiny part (still third picture, above the lever) which is embedded to the lever.

During that preparation, I noticed that the side of the armrest is not vertical but is at an angle. Disaster! How can I adapt the brass body I already did? Well, I bent the legs at an angle which should clear the problem; the second picture is showing the result.

Then it was just a matter to do some contacts and hope for the best. At first, the mobile contacts which are pushed towards their mate were done with .2 mm brass. Finally, I choose .1 mm which allow less effort at the lever and is more flexible. On the third picture, you see those moving contacts near to the mate; the distance between both groups is about .2 mm; the mobile contacts are getting a tiny plate of gold to avoid oxidation.

 

The wire you see is for the ground; the other wires will be soldered during the final assembly, but all completed switches will be verified for functionality with a multi-meter.

 

Now, I can go to the second quarter window switch and maybe to the ones for the doors.

787 Switch.JPG

788 Switch.JPG

789 switch parts.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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Well, doing a model without moving parts shed about 50% of the needed work. Another thinking: when you see pictures from the finished part(s), you cannot see if I had difficulties to get them or if it's was easy. If I had better documented what I did 35 years ago, I would have spared a lot of grey hair!

Anyway, thanks for your fidelity!

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As most of the hardware for the second rear quarter window switch were already done, I could finish it this afternoon. I could improve some details; I had to chase a short but finally I fount it: the lever or button was making contact at the positive plot.

I intend to continue with the switches before I don't remember how I did the first ones!

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13 minutes ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

As most of the hardware for the second rear quarter window switch were already done, I could finish it this afternoon. I could improve some details; I had to chase a short but finally I fount it: the lever or button was making contact at the positive plot.

I intend to continue with the switches before I don't remember how I did the first ones!

That last part is funny

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I see the giant quarter has re-appeared. ;)

I watched your You-Tube video and it was simply amazing.  Thank you so very much for taking us along on your journey, it has been an amazing process.

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Martin, old is always relative...Sometimes, I have the behavior of a teen-ager!

Luv2Wrench: I had many comments also from other forums about that really simple video. It seems that the effect is totally different than pictures. I cannot judge, I have that model almost always under the nose!

 

After the quarter window switches, I went to the group of both located on the RH door, one for the vent window, the other for the side window. I did a simplification compared to the original car: instead of doing a bezel for the switches and attaching it to the main chrome part with screws, I did the holes for the switches and soft soldered a small frame. The holder for the buttons was also soft soldered on the underside, with a provision to attach the insulation plate holding the contacts.

Ah, the contacts! The space for 2 switches is not much generous than the place I had for the rear quarter window switches; this time I had to install 4 contacts in a row! The space at disposal was 3.5 mm (0.14"); finally, I did contacts with a width of 0.5mm (0.02"), not knowing if I would succeed...They are very fragile, but, once installed, they just have to conduct current without being subject to efforts.

As with many parts from this model, the inside trim panel is not vertical but at an angle. The original switches are so small that it does not matter but, in my case, the switch has an important height. This time, I remembered at that peculiar situation and constructed the switch according to the design. This required also to machining the buttons with the same incline, but the visible part of the buttons is straight.

 

Now, with more or less the same design, I can begin the group of 6 switches located on the LH door.

790 RH door switch.JPG

791 RH door switch.JPG

792 RH door switch.JPG

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Oh good heavens... when you said the windows/seats would be controlled by switches I naturally assumed that there would be a bundle of wires that came out of the car and connected to a switch box of sorts.  Never in my wildest imagination would I think that you would actually build miniature switches in their proper place in the car!!!!  You've taken the whole thing to another level and you've done that so many times already.  Incredible. 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Good Gracious Roger !  

 

Miniature operating switches that are exactly like the 1:1 Continental ! ! !  You never cease to amaze............. Most of us out here know what is involved in a 1:1 window or door lock switch (l know, I have taken plenty apart from Jaguar, Chevy, Ford, Packard). And servicing those switches vs. replacing them is a labor.  And here you are doing in in 1:12 scale.  What patience and incredible skill to do that in such a small scale.  And.......you will be disassembling them and having them plated.    Am looking forward to the next installment.  Great job in accomplishing this "headache".  Now that it is behind you, on to the next puzzler.  

 

Bravo

 

Randy   

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Thanks Randy!

 

That group of 6 switches was labor intensive. One reason is the angle between the top of the escutcheon, which is horizontal, and the sides of the arm rest. The great number of contacts and their size did not contributed to have a quick build. Right now, the switches are not functional because the contacts or insulation at the buttons is still too large. I will correct the situation when the buttons are chromed because I have to glue the insulation on them which obviously cannot be done before plating. Anyway, the basis is there.

Now it’s the turn of the last switch which must reverse the polarity: the switch for the seat. On the original car, there is one lever for up and down; the other is for the horizontal adjustment. As I have just one adjustment, both levers will not be independent: pushing on one will let move the other.

For those who know the Mark II well, I did a simplification: between each lever/switch, there is a partition which should prevents that the user is actuating 2 switches at the same time. As those partitions are so small, I’m skipping them.

 

This morning, I bought some resistances to slow the vent window. I bought some 22 Ohms and 33 Ohms. The last one is the best; now the time to open or close the vent windows is more realistic.

 

 

793 LH contacts.JPG

794 LH contacts.JPG

795 LH switch assy.JPG

796 LH switch asy.JPG

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The switch for the seat is done. It's similar to the other switches, just the location crated some difficulties. The wiring going to the motor is not yet soldered; this will be done during assembly as I don't know yet if I will do a solid wire from switch to motor or if I will add some kind of connector in between.

The journey will continue that way: remove the body from the frame to finish the inside parts like door panels, inside moldings and so on. Once all the parts are done and ready to be covered with leather, it will be the time to solder the roof to the body and prepare the first batch for plating.

I suppose the end of this short program will be when 2016 is over...

 

 

797 switch for seat.JPG

798 switch for seat.JPG

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Thanks Jeff!

Now, it's going backwards...2 days ago, I began to remove the body from the frame. Now, I have assemblies everywhere! I noticed that I had to improve the attachment of the steering column to the body by adding a locator for the column (to have a precise location), soldered one element to the body and modified both screws which attach the column to the body as I realized that once the roof will be attached, I will not be able to turn the screws.

 

I will also fabricate special nuts for the various motors located in the body, again because the roof will makes very difficult to screw the standard nuts.

 

It was also the opportunity to attach the A/C plumbing to the front fender, as well as the windshield washer jar.

 

 

799 adding details.JPG

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Roger,di

 

I see wires coming out of the windshield washer jar assembly.  DON'T tell me that the windshield washer is operational? Imagine pushing a button and a fine mist hits the windshield. Next thing, you will have operating windshield wipers !  Do you have miniature bugs to spatter on the windshield too?  I would not put it past you.  Amazing work !

This car will be so authentic.  If a professional photographer were to shoot the car in the right setting/diorama, it would take a very trained eye to tell that this is a 1:12 automobile.

Your level of detail is mind boggling. The descriptive word used is ":Awesome".\

 

 

Randy

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The last few days, I did the inside moldings at the base of the windshield and the kick panel on the RH side. It was not an easy task to make the parts as there are compound curves and dash, moldings and kick panel are, for that period, very well integrated to each other's. My picture is showing that some improvement must be done to get the spirit from the original; anyway, I'm close to it.

As you may see, the body is now alone as it was not practical at all to work inside the car with all the weight from the almost complete model. Now I will do the other kick panel.

 

 

800 kick panel.JPG

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OF COURSE HE DOES ! ! !  If you follow this build, back in the beginning, you will see the Studebaker Avanti and the Oldsmobile Toronado that he built from scratch, including the interiors and paint.  A consummate, skilled modeler we are blessed to follow.  He is an engineer with the Swiss watchmakers attention to detail that leaves the rest of us in the dust!  

 

What is phenomenal about Roger is that we get a posting as he progresses with the model.  We are seeing it come to life, one piece at a time.  What is absolutely astounding is the fact that he leaves nothing to the imagination.  OPERATING WINDOW SWITCHES AND POWER SEAT SWITCHES !  !  Hood springs that actually work.  Working suspension that is correct. And on and on and on.  In 1:12 scale no less. My God!   To put this in perspective, get  a small block of brass and start filing away.  After a couple of weeks, see if you can duplicate what he has done here.  If you can, then we need to be following your blog too !

 

This level of model craftsmanship is rarefied air.  VERY FEW HAVE ATTAINED this level of craftsmanship.  There are some are out there but few and far between.

 

Roger, thank goodness that you are driven to overcome all of the hurdles that you are faced with every time that you turn around.  As stated in earlier postings, I can imagine that you go to bed at night with the current issue or problem that you have in front of you. Waking up the next morning (or after several days of contemplation) you patiently explain to us how you achieve your desired results.  That is what makes this story so fascinating.  A lot of us are working with 1:1 issues and some of us have a hard time with different problems.  But not having blueprints to work with, just pictures and hand measurements to go on, you seem to come up with the part(s) to "soldier on".  

 

Sometimes we have to wait a while for the next posting but when you do post, it is enjoyable to see what you have done next.  We sit in awe when we see what you have done next.  We all await the day when you finally post;  ALL DONE !   It will be a bitter sweet time for us (and you) as this story will come to a conclusion.  All of us hope that you will find something else that will pique your fancy and then we will be off on another adventure...............................

 

Roger, can you imagine how many followers you have out here?  I am sure that many log on and see what is going on and may never post a replay, but they are out there sharing in this story.

 

God watch over you and keep you healthy and safe.

 

Randy   

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

What he said!!!

 

I started following Roger about 1/3 the way into the build. I must have missed that part about paint and upholstery). No words are appropriate for the stunning level he has reached. I would say no more than a handful in history have obtained his level. Many have tried. He is the "gold standard" that any serious scale artist (modeler seems too mundane in this context) would only dream of matching. The only way to improve is to create a running scale engine. I have seen some of those in action, still amazed at the artistry. (picking up my jaw off the desk now)

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Roger,

 

Have you thought about  the color that you want the Continental to be finished in?  Are you picking an original color that was used back in the 50's? It looks like you are "rounding the bend" so to speak and are coming up on the time for the interior finish work (upholstery, headliner, door panels, parcel shelf, interior paint and carpet), disassembly, painting and re assembly.  It is getting to be an exciting time in the life of the Continental.  6 year gestation period.  Lots of stretch marks, eh?   :-) 

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Roger

I do not stop by very often and shame on me because I am blown away when I do. You are a craftsman with no limitations and my hat is off to you. It has been a long time and you are still going strong. That is one beautiful car to be proud of all you have mastered. 

Thank you for sharing.

Nelson Collar

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  • 3 weeks later...

After my vacation, I began with the LH door trim. After one week working on that trim assembly, it's almost ready. I began with the upper molding which must flow into the upper dash molding. Once the upper door's molding was attached, I saw that I had to rework the dash's molding!

Then came the flat panel between the upper molding and the arm rest. As usual, the big question was: how do I attach it? Finally, I choose the solution to hook the upper part under the upper molding and secure it to the door structure with 2 screws. Some rework at the structure was necessary; the third screw I planned will not be used because of interference with the switch assembly.

The lower trim was again a nightmare with the way to attach it to the door. Finally, 2 hooks are soldered to the structure and 3 screws are securing it to the door. I had to do a minor rework to the seat switch and another rework to the structure to make room for the main switch. In between, with all those reworks, I got trouble with the side window, it was jamming!

Some parts are not yet done: the large middle molding going from the switch bezel to the end of the door, both end caps at the upper molding and the dummy inside door handle.

During that trim construction, I had to take some decisions: due to the length of the seat switch, the depression into the arm rest (to grab the door to close it) was relocated 5 mm behind the measured dimension. Then, I decided that the inside handle to open the door will not be operative: too much space will be occupied by the future wiring and switch assembly and the steering wheel would anyway prevents to open the door from inside.

The rear ashtray will unfortunately stay closed: my hinge is taking too much space, by opening the ash tray, the cover is contacting the middle panel, preventing a complete opening. If the armrest would be wider, I could overcome the problem but then I could not close the door because the arm rest would contact the seat!

The third decision is the way the door will finally be installed: it will be assembled completely like a module, then the wiring will be inserted through the "A" pillar; the door assembled to the body; once the wiring is secured and connected, the dash will be installed.

 

 

801 door panel.JPG

802 door panel.JPG

803 door panel.JPG

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