Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I have noticed many under dash heaters for the 37 and 38 Buicks, but not much info on the hearer for a 40. Did they make an under dash for the 40 Buick, or did they use the under seat. My car was built in California and spent all of it's life there with an after market heater, but I haven't heard, or seen a heater for the 40 made by Buick. Information would be appreciated.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know the answer for sure, but I'm thinking that since they used the same "C" bodies for the Super in both '40 and '41, the heater options were probably the same for both years.  If that's the case, they offered an under seat heater and an under dash defroster.  That's what my '41 has.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve seen Buick’s with no heaters but the factory heater was under the seat with a separate heated defroster under the right side of the dash. Any firewall mounted heater would be and aftermarket or customer modification. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Heaters were optional and customers in warm climates often didn't order them. Dealers could still install an under-dash heater they way they always had if a customer wanted it (or a customer could do it himself) but retrofitting the under-seat heater was unlikely. My father's 1941 Super coupe was originally purchased in Florida so it had no factory heater or defroster and the dash knobs were just the plain ACCESSORY dummy knobs. He ultimately installed a gasoline-fired Southwind under-dash heater for winter driving as he drove that car daily, year 'round in Cleveland, from 1977-1985. I don't know why he preferred the Southwind to a conventional hot water heater, but I do remember he was constantly monkeying with it and always came home from Hershey with another one for parts.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My 36 Pontiac still doesn't have a heater.

 

As for the southwind, they are very effective and most likely put a hot water heater to shame, particularly if that hot water heater is in a prewar car with a fairly cold thermostat.

 

In 1960s and 1970s cars you can sure tell a difference between a 195 degree thermostat and a 180 degree thermostat in the winter. Most prewar cars came with 160 degree thermostats (or less, or none at all) due to the alcohol antifreeze in common use at the time.

 

Southwinds burn gasoline and I am not quite bold enough for that these days. I think I'll stick with lap robes. How about you guys?

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Bloo said:

Southwinds burn gasoline and I am not quite bold enough for that these days. I think I'll stick with lap robes. How about you guys?

 

Sure sounds like a recipe for disaster to me, but I guess from what Matt says that at least his Dad survived.  Did the heater get gasoline from the main tank or did it have a separate tank that you had to fill?  Also, didn't it stink to high heaven?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the 80s I had a 52 Special that had a gas heater. I was still in California at the time and I rarely used it, as it sure heated things up.

 

Thank you all for the replies. 

Edited by kingrudy
Forgot something (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

My 1940 Special had a heater under the passenger seat. It was rusted stuck and didn't work so I disconnected the long hoses to it. It was made by Harrison, the same company that made radiators.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the additional information. As the car did not come with an under seat heater, but was fitted with a HaDees under dash unit from the forties, I will try to dress this up and make this functional. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...