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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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No, no, SiliconS, it the picture from my own emblem! As usual, I'm forgetting to put a coin!

 

The memory is a strange thing: before I began the new ornament, I could not remember how the first emblem was done. While “playing” with the second one, the “click” came: I just took 3 pieces of brass large and thick enough to have enough material to file away to get the desired shape. This time I did differently: I prepared the horizontal bar and gave its definitive shape. Then it was the turn to the vertical one. Finally, I did grooves into both parts to have an as perfect as possible fit. As I’m using that fantastic silver solder paste, if a void is too large, the result will be compromised. Joining both parts went well, no rework at the joints were necessary; however, the cross is not yet ready: a tiny part, the one behind the helmet, had to be done separately for practical reasons. More grooves and fitting were performed until I was satisfied. The soldering paste came once more in action; the attached picture is showing the cross without any rework after the soldering; a good polishing will be needed to remove the residues and discoloration on the brass.

Compared to the old cross, the emerging vertical bars have the same length when measured from the horizontal bar’s edges.

The next steps are more grooves to have the décor support fitted, plus another four grooves for the circle.

 

 

1018 new emblem.JPG

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Roger

It has been too long since I visited and you have made some great accomplishments. You are one of the masters, if I did not see it growing before my eyes over the 8 plus years I would not believe. That car is almost ready to take for a ride. Now all we need to do is figure how to shrink ourselves down to scale. That is impossible but it sure is looking good. Very, very very nice, you just finish that one of a kind because people like me will drool over it and how wonderfully it was made in miniature. My hat is off to you. March 2010 just seems like yesterday but my body knows different. 

Best wishes on the completion.

Nelson

 

one fine looking ride 

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While waiting for the decals, I began a futile assembly: the bumper jack. People familiar with US cars from the fifties and later are accustomed to the usual bumper jacks; the one for the Mark II is different and as dangerous to use as the others, simpler ones. As I wanted to have a functional jack, some planning was necessary.

The picture is showing almost all parts needed for that accessory. Among the missing parts: the hook which will be made according to my bumpers.

In between, the last decal’s batch came in; I can now continue with the dash and further assembly, but first the jack will be finished.

Cric2.jpg

1020 bumper jack.JPG

1021 second batch.JPG

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Roger, which parts of the build do you enjoy the most? I know from the restoration of my 1:1 Corvette that I enjoy some jobs more than others. Do you prefer the fabrication of small metal items? Large body panels? Interior parts? Electrics? Paint? Problem solving? I'm guessing the body panels would be near the bottom of your list because you said you found them difficult!

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That's a difficult question because, when a part is finished, I usually forget all about it! I will try to answer as well as I can:

the most enjoying part when I begin a model is the frame. It's usually easy and I like silver solder. I also like turning small (and not so small) parts on the lathe because it's easy! Milling some details is also enjoyable, as long as the part(s) is or are of a regular shape.

In fact, doing the body with sheet metal was a fist for me but, after all, not so difficult after some experience. Yes, there were difficult panels like the hood and the trunk lid, but it does not mean that I hated to do them! I However, finishing the body with the various fillers is not what I prefer. Electrical? I don't especially like because I'm not well equipped to manufacture small switches like those for the windows; the ones I did are probably not too reliable. Wiring is a problem because at the correct scale, the wires should not have a diameter larger than a horse hair, which is just not possible. I like to paint parts, but I hate that when I'm faced with problems (but who likes to have problems while painting?), but I really like when a body part is well painted and all shiny!

Interior parts are not bad; I like to work with thin leather. This model has various challenges because inside panels are not vertical and there are too many small parts assembled together.

Doing the windshield and back window is never something I like to do: the correct shape is difficult to get right and the Plexiglas can react badly if the heat is too high.

Sometimes, I'm spending more time to think "how to do that" to have the right aspect, sufficient stability and function as to do the part itself.

 

What I hate and I'm not alone: doing a part, finishing it and found later that it's wrong, like the trunk lid emblem!

 

 

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I remember very well the bumper jacks like the one you are replicating. My grandfather had one he used on his 1956 Buick Roadmaster, and it picked that big car up like a toy. I remember it was dark red in color, and somehow I ended up with it. Your build is coming along very nicely, the car looks "right" from every angle, and that 's really the truest test. Always looking forward to your updates.

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While soft soldering one of both bearings for the long screw, the screw got soldered too! Fortunately, I could unsolder the bearing and screw. With some rework (using a steel part to avoid the same accident), I could finish the main part. Then it was the turn of the second leg and the handle. I got then in trouble with the hook. I had good pictures from a Mark II forum member and I could not figure how that should work because I was on the wrong brand: on my Cadillacs, the hook is following the shape or the bumper, but not here. Anyway both bumpers don’t have the same profile; therefore a little change from the common practice was developed for the Mark II: the hook is contacting the rear bumper at the bottom; the upper part of the hook is pushing against the upper bar. It’s a little bit different at the front: the hook is grabbing a bumper support and, like at the rear, the upper part is pushing the upper bar.

I did a quick try with the model; it works well!

Now, the jack should be painted. With a little use just for the fun, there will be some scratches due to the nature of that tool. That’s life!

1022 bumper jack.JPG

1023 jack stored.JPG

1024 jack in use.JPG

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Roger has blown me away from the first time I seen his build around 2012. I went back to the beginning to catch up on his build and for the past 6 years I stop in to see the progress. And still all these years later there is nothing Roger does that just amaze from the beginning with the rims and tire build to today with all the little parts that looks so life size. The detail that goes into every part is what keeps me coming back. A true craftsman at the highest level. 

My hat is off to you Roger.

Nelson

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12 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Nelson, are you the person (with your wife) who visited me long ago? I remember you were amazed that all I did was in that small room!

Anyway, thanks for your comments, they are appreciated.

Roger 

I could not be so lucky. It is something I would love to do but the best thing I can do is sit here and look at my screen. You are truly a master. I have enjoyed it from the first finding your build. 

Nelson

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My wife and I have been following the fabulous fabricating here and when I showed her the WORKING jack, she looked at me and said, "Of COURSE it works! Why wouldn't it?" I agreed.

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 I just love seeing the results of your work! I cannot add anything to what has already been said. In a strange way, I will be sad when you finish the build, as I've come to look forward to these gems from you via the internet.

 This is perhaps enough justification for the internet itself, the privilege of seeing your work.

 Keith

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On 10/17/2018 at 9:59 PM, Buicknutty said:

 

 This is perhaps enough justification for the internet itself, the privilege of seeing your work.

 Keith

 

Well said... I have thought many times that without the Internet I would have missed this work of art.  Of course Roger has to also take the time to post these pictures as well!!

 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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Thanks for the comments; I appreciate that you are enjoying what I'm doing!

After the bumper jack digression, I’m back to the model. As I got the decals for the dash, it was time to use them; this was the last step before the dash could be definitively assembled.. After the assembly, I did a test fit in the car; I had to relocate the wiring for the lamps at the switch to avoid an interference with the hand brake support. It was more a supposition as it’s rather difficult to see something when the assembly is in place. I removed also some brass at the base of the console because the velvet is so thick I had difficulties to have the proper dash’s location.

Without wiring, the dash would be already installed. I have to plan with great care how I will proceed now with the door’s wires.

 

 

1025 Dash.JPG

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Pat, you are asking too much, see below:

 

Usually, when I’m reluctant to begin a task, problems will arise. This is what is happening with the installation of the RH door wiring and the dash into the car: the wiring is jamming at each end of the dash! One step forwards and 3 backwards: I will have to do the wiring across the floor but for that, I have to remove the carpet I already installed! Of course, the velvet will be destroyed because it is glued to the support. Sometimes modelling is not fun!

 

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
name spelling (see edit history)
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When there are issues or assembly problems with an "ordinary" model, one can always go to the instructions and usually get back on track. We all need to remember that there ARE no instructions for what you are building - just your vast experience and the knowledge you have gained over many years of trial and error. The fact that you don't have to take the whole thing apart at every step is a testament to the planning you've successfully put into the project. Of course there will be setbacks and the occasional do- over will be required . . . So you deal with it, and move on. Improvise, adapt, and overcome. And you inspire us all.

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Roger,

 

A while back I was just wondering about the jack.  And here you have constructed one...........THAT WORKS ! !   But like Keiser's wife's comments;  OF COURSE IT WORKS !  WHY WOULDN'T  IT?.  She said it all.  If you have functioning window switches, power seats, functioning emergency brake, why wouldn't a functioning jack work?  For me, it looks pretty straight forward to make.  Much less complicated than a window regulator or an E brake assembly. 

 

Like the rest of the followers of your thread, we have practically run out of descriptives to comment on with the next item that you fabricate or a new problem that arises and how you overcome it.  Just Amazing.

 

Like the previous comments.  It will be a bitter/sweet day when the masterpiece is completed.  On that day, there will be a void in the universe ! NO ROGER Z to tune into.  You really should think about another model to do..............................................  :-)   (I know that it is a selfish wish but with the demise of everything else in this world, your thread is something that we look forward to.......and enjoy).

 

Randy 

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Roger,

 

Note how we are all excited about your jack.  The work to do the trunk crest with the correct decal in the background was probably a lot more intricate and time consuming than planning and fabricating the jack.  But any of us who have helped our dad in changing a tire on one of the 50's model GM cars can attest to how heavy they were and how important it was to get the jack in the correct position. 

 

On my dad's 56 Buick Special station wagon, he was always having the tires checked at the local service station before we went on any of our outings.  Still , fate would sometimes deal us with a blow out and we would limp to the side of the hi way where my older brother and I  would assist my dad in changing the tire.  Mind you, it was not often but when it did happen, it was an event.  Little things like chocking the tire, breaking the lug nuts loose before jacking up the car, wrestling the spare out from the compartment and doing the proper torquing of the lug nuts was all part of the lesson that was handed down by my father to me and my brother.  And not to be out done, mom standing there with a wet and dry towel to clean our hands when we were done.  Lest we get our clothes and the car dirty. 

 

Life in the 50's.  Uncomplicated and much simpler.  Today, the new cars don't even come with a spare or jack ! !  Boy how we have evolved.  

 

Randy 

 

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The Ford and Lincoln was much differ from GM's. The jack on the Lincoln had a lip that hooked on the bottom edge of the bumper and the GM's evolved to a slot in the bumper before you had to get under the car to find the frame pad for the smaller jacks. Everything changes and like you say today we just make a call and someone in a truck comes and fixes it or takes it in to be fixed. I wonder if we have gone forward in technology and become dumber in common sense and experiences. 

Hope I did not set off a firestorm. Cheers

Nelson

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7 hours ago, NCollar said:

today we just make a call and someone in a truck comes and fixes it or takes it in to be fixed

Wow. I wouldn't dream of waiting for an hour for someone to come and change a tire. Yes it is, however, getting harder to get down to put the jack under the arrow and harder to get up again.

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To fyreline: it would be fine if an assembly manual would be available and telling "don't do that way but put that thing here!" Halas, I have to "write" that manual myself and do the necessary corrections!

 

To Randy: I was almost sure that the jack would create some reaction because it's not at all expected on a scale model!

 

To keiser31 and Nelson: There is a pocket at the base of the rear bumper, near the attaching points to the frame, see the attached picture. On the front, the hook is grabbing at the bumper's bracket. On my Cadillacs from the fifties, the bumper jack brabs the bumper at its base, the hook is following the shape of the bumper. On the '57 Brougham, there is a hole at the bumper ends, the hook is coming into that hope. I discovered that when I have to lift the rear of the car after one levelling valve lost the air for the suspension during a drive. There were later slots into the bumpers; my '80 Olds had them.

 

Yesterday, I removed some pieces from the carpet (velvet) and the underlying material. Boy! I did not spare with the glue when I did that! I will use less in the future…Now, the RH door is permanently “attached” to the body with the wiring. To keep the excess wiring as short as possible, I put the door on some wood and protective material. That way, I can work into the car without be limited by the door. It would be nice to have connector(s) but they are taking too much space!

The wiring is held on the floor with instant glue; I hope that I will not have to do some modification! The wires are adding some height at the tunnel; I will have to do some padding on the tunnel to have a level surface with the wires.

Today, I will redo the carpeting on the RH side. The next step is to solder the wires to a circuit board which will be located behind the LH kick panel. After that, the dash will come in.

734 exhaust outlet tubes.JPG

1026 The wiring.JPG

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Fortunately, there are more good news than bad ones, at least with that model. Routing the door’s harness through the floor was not a big deal; I have enough slack to solder the wires on the board outside the car; on the first picture, you can see that board in its approximate final position. The plan is to do the same with the LH door: pass the wiring through the A pillar; the wire should be long enough to solder them at the corresponding place on that board slightly out of the car.

Once the carpet on the RH side was replaced, (the carpet under the feet will be installed later), I could try to install the dash; I had to take it out 2 times due to the routing of the remaining wires. The moldings at the base of the windshield could also be installed; by chance I could insert 5 from 6 small screws to attach the moldings to the firewall. The 6th screw could not be installed because, when I constructed those parts, the roof was not attached and that screw behind the instruments pod could be screwed in. Now, the roof is in the way…I will put a dummy screw to plug the hole.

I had to shorten a bit the upper door’s molding, it was touching at the rear quarter and at the dash; fortunately that molding is just pushed on the trim!

Yesterday, the trunk emblem came home from the chrome shop. Today, I put a new decal on the base and installed the assembly on the trunk. Honestly, the difference between the old emblem and to new one is not overwhelming; most probably the effort to make a new part was not necessary but I have now a part without design error.

1027 RH wiring complete.JPG

1028 dash and RH door.JPG

1029 Dash and RH door.JPG

1030 New emblem.JPG

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Trunk lid is  beautiful. It looked good before. But, knowing it's precise is a comfort to us watching this come together.

What solder do  you use that the fumes don't contaminate nearby items that are fully finished.? Are there registration papers in the glove box? I ask because you'll get pulled over for sure with no plates on the rear.. haha

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Thanks Pat! I'm using regular soft solder and only a few quantity of soldering grease. This is this product which is emitting fumes when used liberally. This is also the reason why I prefer to solder the wires outside of the car.

There are no registration paper in the glove box (I'm not equipped to create such documents at this scale), but a license plate will come. Don't know yet how it will look like, I still have a few months to decide!

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16 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

1030 New emblem.JPG

 

I sometimes wonder, Roger, how your photos would look if you changed the camera angle slightly so they looked as though they could have been taken by someone standing behind a real car. In this photo the car looks completely life-size, except that the camera position is higher than it could naturally be for an adult standing behind a car. It might be difficult to get the photo's background to look realistic if more of it is visible, but I'd love to see you try!

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